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American New Wave Musical Groups (X) Philosophy (X)

       
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The Silver Lining: Moral Deliberations in Modern Cinema

By: Sam Vaknin, Ph. D.

...gy of Environmentalism XI. The Invention of Lying: Fact and Truth XII. Hostel: The American Hostel XIII. Inceptions and Its Errors XIV. Aliens „R ... ... He lacks real talents - he know how to play only six jazz tunes, can't make up his musical mind between his faithful sax and a newly alluring drum ... ... cultivates a False Self of a jazz giant in the making and the author of the Great American Novel but he is neither and he bitterly knows it. Even ... ...ntors. The source of the dilemma (which led to his act of choosing) is that the two groups overlap. Truman found himself in the impossible positio... ...gh grim looking tubes and keeps them immersed in gelatinous liquid in cocoons. This new "machine species" derives its energy needs from the electric... ... endowed with a brain). Equally undoubtedly, this self-identity is not Dan's (but a new, unfamiliar, one). Such is the stuff of our nightmares - bo... ..., then young girls and female infants would have been preferred over all the other groups of passengers. Old women would have been left with the me... ...A book, a painting, an invention are the documentation and representation of brain waves. They are mere shadows, symbols of the real presence - our... ...he PRODUCTS of our brain activity, to the recording and documentation of our brain waves. But we hold only partial rights to the brain itself, thei...

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Cyclopedia of Philosophy

By: Sam Vaknin

...material to the one fetus created. The egg and sperm can be compared to the famous wave function (state vector) in quantum mechanics – the represen... ...tates (=millions of potential embryos and lives). The fetus is the collapse of the wave function: it represents a much more limited set of potentia... ...de and supersede one's moral obligations towards non- affiliated humans. Thus, an American's moral obligation to safeguard the lives of American f... ...igation to save the lives of innocent civilians, however numerous, if they are not Americans. The larger the number of positive self-definitions I ... ...m" still reign supreme. In extreme - though surprisingly frequent - cases, whole groups (typically minorities) are excluded from the nation's mor... ...scheme known as the stock exchange, this expectation is proportional to liquidity - new suckers - and volatility. Thus, the price of any given stock... ...Honderich, Ted, ed. - The Oxford Companion to Philosophy - Oxford University Press, New York, 1995 - p. 31) Anarchists are not opposed to organizat... ...ists (like musicians) - often describe their interpretation of an artwork (e.g., a musical piece) in terms of this type of intuition. Many mathemat... ...nt individualism play an important socio-cultural role in this semipternal game of musical chairs. Many products have a limited shelf life or an ex...

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Sextus Empiricus and Greek Scepticism

By: Mary Mills Patrick

...ern Switzerland, November 1897 BY MARY MILLS PATRICK PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE, CONSTANTINOPLE TURKEY This Thesis is accompanied b... ...opes of Aenesidemus against Aetiology. The Tropes of ἐπνρή are arranged in groups of ten, five and two, according to the period of the Sceptical Sc... ...the period of the Sceptical School to which they belong; the first of these groups is historically the most important, or the Ten Tropes of ἐπνρή, a... ...n rooms rich in gold, Another safe travelling enjoys, in a swift ship, on a wave of the sea. [1] Hyp. I. 85. [2] Hyp. I. 87-89. [3] Hyp. I. 86. T... ...e this Trope in his introduction to the ten Tropes leads one to expect here new illustrations and added [2] arguments for ἐπνρή. We find, however, ... ...nd use in the Sceptical School. These methods of proof were, of course, not new, but were well known to Aristotle, and were used by the Sceptical Ac... ...ena. For example, the Pythagoreans explain the distance of the planets by a musical proportion. II. From many equally plausible reasons which might ... ... rich in gold, Another still, safe travelling enjoys, in a swift ship, on a wave of the sea." And the poet says— "One man enjoys this, another enjo...

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The Ulysseans

By: Antonio Mercurio

... contains I suggest that besides reading it individually you discuss it in groups, together with other people who are enthusiastic about the ideas it... ...though they were morsels of food. One day you will find you have developed new thoughts and behaviours that will surprise you and that will bring yo... ...have been working to create centers of energy that are capable of giving a new soul to tomorrow’s Western World; a soul that can handle the massive ... ...e anonymity of the masses. 36 Otherwise, let’s take the example of a musical instrument: a violin, a standup bass or an entire orchestra. Some... ... a melody or a symphony. If we want to, we can imagine our lives like a musical instrument that has four strings: the body, the psyche, the I Per... ...k at how Ben-Hur manages to enter into deep contact and get on to the same wavelength with each of the horses. Those who have seen the film will r... ...he comments you made yesterday evening and this morning, both in the small groups and in the big one. Allow me, after having expressed my admiration ... ...lopment of my reflections on the anthropic principle created by a group of American scientists. Anyone who would like to know more about the anthro... ...d being devoured by Polyphemous or the Sirens or being swallowed up by the waves; he still must face the anguish of how to get by Scylla and Charybd...

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Madame Bovary

By: Gustave Flaubert

...Chapter One W E WERE IN CLASS when the head-master came in, followed by a “new fellow,” not wearing the school uniform, and a school servant car- ryin... ...ory, he will go into one of the upper classes, as be- comes his age.” The “new fellow,” standing in the corner behind the door so that he could hardly... ...ding amid the green corn, soon lengthened out, and broke up into different groups that loitered to talk. The fiddler walked in front with his violin, ... ... the foot of an immense green-sward, on which some cows were grazing among groups of large trees set out at regular intervals, while large beds of arb... ...rawled or rested. The sun pierced with a ray the small blue bubbles of the waves that, breaking, fol- lowed each other; branchless old willows mirrore... ...along the slippery banks. They had often walked there to the murmur of the waves over the moss-covered pebbles. How bright the sun had been! What happ... ...r for calls. I saw that the very moment that I came in. I’ve the eye of an American!” He did not send the stuff; he brought it. Then he came again to ... ...n be- gan to sing— “One night, do you remember, we were sailing,” etc. Her musical but weak voice died away along the waves, and the winds carried off... ...at is to say, the beginning of win- ter, that she seemed seized with great musical fervour. One evening when Charles was listening to her, she began t...

...Excerpt: PART I. Chapter One. We were in class when the head-master came in, followed by a ?new fellow,? not wearing the school uniform, and a school servant carrying a large desk. Those who had been asleep woke up, and every one rose as if just surprised at his work. The head-master made a sign to us to sit down. T...

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The Enormous Room

By: E. E. Cummings

...e criminal to delay any longer calling to your atten- tion a crime against American citizenship in which the French Government has persisted for many ... ...ment has persisted for many weeks—in spite of constant appeals made to the American Minister at Paris; and in spite of subse- quent action taken by th... ... ever since I received your cable, arrived this morning. My son arrived in New York on January 1st. He was in bad shape physically as a result of his ... ...l reminder of official hospitality. He is, at present, visiting friends in New 7 e e cummings York. If he were here, I am sure he would join with me ... ... to approach the Renault (in which B.’s baggage was already deposited) and waved me into the F .I.A.T ., bed, bed-roll and all; whereupon t-d leaped i... ...window I saw my friend drive away with t-d Number 2 and Nemo; then, having waved hasty farewell to all les Américains that I knew—three in number—and ... ... voice: “O Jack, give me a cigarette.” A handsome face, dark, Latin smile, musical fingers strong. I waded suddenly through a group of gendarmes (they... ...s personal and exclusive use. All this time he has been singing loudly and musically the following sumptu- ously imaginative ditty: “mEEt me tonIght... ...acé was the kinetic aspect of that institution; the arrivals, singly or in groups, of nouveaux of sundry nationalities whereby our otherwise more or l...

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Three Soldiers

By: John Dos Passos

...re in right with him, but the lieutenant’s a stinker … . Where you from?” “New York,” said the rookie, a little man of thirty with an ash-colored face... ... ye, when you get home, rookie … . But you’re in luck.” “Why?” “Bein’ from New York. The corporal, Tim Sidis, is from New York, an’ all the New York f... ...re a pair of eyes glinted in the white flick- ering light from the screen. Waves of laughter or of little exclamations passed over them. They were all... ...limpse of Chris standing with his arm about Andrews’s shoulders. They both waved. Fuselli grinned and expanded his chest. They were just rookies still... ...d went unsteadily to the rail, keeping, as he threaded his way through the groups that covered the transport’s after deck, a little of his cowboy’s bo... ...buttons on their khaki uniforms, among whom was a good sprinkling of lanky Americans. “T ommies,” said Fuselli to himself. After standing in line a wh... ...ad just made a coup de main and captured a whole trenchful.” “Of who?” “Of Americans—of us!” “The hell you say!” “That’s a goddam lie,” shouted a blac... ...shadow. When he tried to seize hold of his thoughts, to give them definite musical expression in his mind, he found himself suddenly empty, the way a ... ...Vain En- deavor? I guess you didn’t go round with the intellectual set … . Musical people often don’t … . Of course I don’t mean the Village. All anar...

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Essays

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson

......................................................................... 301 NEW ENGLAND REFORMERS ........................................................ ......................................................................... 315 NEW ENGLAND REFORMERS ........................................................ ...eading those fine apostrophes to sleep, to the stars, rocks, mountains and waves, I feel time passing away as 18 Essays an ebbing sea. I feel the ete... ... idols are Italy, England, Egypt, retains its fascination for all educated Americans. They who made England, Italy, or Greece venerable in the imagina... ...r of thought and quaint expression are as near to us as to any, and if the American artist will study with hope and love the precise thing to be done ... ...corn, grind it in his hand-mill, and bake his bread himself.” Society is a wave. The wave moves onward, but the water of which it is composed does not... ... party or common nature is not social; it is impersonal; is God. And so in groups where debate is earnest, and especially on high questions, the compa... ...bulk left out, and the spirit or moral of it contracted 180 Essays into a musical word, or the most cunning stroke of the pencil? But the artist must... ...rt of human character,—a wonderful expression through stone, or canvas, or musical sound, of the deepest and simplest attributes of our nature, and th...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Three

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...ry thing, and had speculated very suc- cessfully in stocks of the Edgarton New Bank, as it was for- merly called. By these and other means he had mana... ... eccentric manners—he is well known to almost every person who has visited New Bedford. I stayed at his school until I was sixteen, when I left him fo... ...s- ited these regions, had great weight, apparently, with the muti- neers, wavering, as they were, between half-engendered no- tions of profit and ple... ... the wind issues, and the windward bow of course receives the shock of the waves. In this situa- tion a good vessel will ride out a very heavy gale of... ...was not long after Captain Patten’s visit that Cap- tain Colquhoun, of the American brig Betsey, touched at the largest of the islands for the purpose... ...1, a Captain Haywood, in the Nereus, visited Tristan. He found there three Americans, who were residing upon the island to prepare sealskins and oil. ... ...ity of biche de mer than the oldest seamen among us had ever seen in those groups of the lower latitudes most celebrated for this article of commerce.... ...cid cast of beauty, and the thrilling and enthralling eloquence of her low musical language, made their way into my heart by paces so steadily and ste... ...could no longer bear the touch of her wan fingers, nor the low tone of her musical language, nor the lustre of her melancholy eyes. And she knew all t...

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A Room with a View

By: E. M. Forster

... The better class of tourist was shocked at this, and sympathized with the new-comers. Miss Bartlett, in reply, opened her mouth as little as possible... ...ery interesting, and Lucy hurried over her breakfast, and started with her new friend in high spirits. Italy was coming at last. The Cock- ney Signora... ...r dog, and here and there a priest modestly edging to his Mass through the groups of tourists. But Mr. Emerson was only half interested. He watched th... ...Mr. Beebe was walking up to the Torre del Gallo with the Emersons and some American ladies. Would Miss Bartlett and Miss Honeychurch join the party? C... ...they mix up towns, rivers, palaces in one inextricable whirl. You know the American girl in Punch who says: ‘Say, poppa, what did we see at Rome?’ And... ...radiant joy in her face, he saw the flowers beat against her dress in blue waves. The bushes above them closed. He stepped quickly forward and kissed ... ... Lucy for several years, but only as a commonplace girl who happened to be musical. He could still remember his depression that after- noon at Rome, w... ...will tell you, that our earthly life provides.” It was now time for him to wave his hat at the approaching trio. He did not omit to do so. “She has le... ...ict me. No doubt I am neither artistic nor literary nor intellec- tual nor musical, but I cannot help the drawing-room furniture; your father bought i...

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The Longest Journey

By: E. M. Forster

...in it. The pictures were not attrac- tive, nor did they attract her—school groups, Watts’ “Sir Percival,” a dog running after a rabbit, a man running ... ..., so don’t be so chilly and cautious. I’ve just realized, looking at those groups, that you must have been at school together. Did you come much acros... ...s rather careful when he drove up to the fa- cade of his shop. “I like our new lettering,” he said thoughtfully. The words “Stewart Ansell” were repea... ...cker blue.” 36 The Longest Journey “Rather! He’s secretary to the college musical soci- ety.” “A. P. Carruthers?” “Yes.” Mr. Dawes seemed offended. H... ...to-date were said to be combined. The school doubled its numbers. It built new class-rooms, laboratories and a gymna- sium. It dropped the prefix “Gra... ... slanged the proprietor and ragged the pretty girls; while Rickie, as each wave of vulgarity burst over him, sunk his head lower and lower, and wished... ...man road along by the straw sacks. His impulse was to retreat, but someone waved to him. It was Agnes. She waved continually, as much as to say, “Wait... ...e of criticism is quite a thing of the past. Have you seen the illustrated American edition?” “I don’t remember.” “Might I send you a copy? I think yo...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume One

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...ting place of Edgar Allan Poe, the most interesting and original figure in American letters. And, to sig- nify that peculiar musical quality of Poe’s ... ...g and original figure in American letters. And, to sig- nify that peculiar musical quality of Poe’s genius which inthralls every reader, Mr. Lowell su... ...s unmortified sense of independence.” And this was the tribute paid by the American public to the master who had given to it such tales of conjuring c... ...other and sister, the remaining children, were cared for by others. In his new home Edgar found all the luxury and advantages money could provide. He ... ...cted with various newspapers and magazines in Richmond, Phila- delphia and New Y ork. He was faithful, punctual, industrious, thorough. N. P . Willis,... ...roper relation of parts, and to draw a correct outline, while the sec- ond groups, fills up and colors. Both of these Mr. Poe has displayed with singu... ...here they fell, but sunk slowly and steadily down, and commingled with the waves, while from the trunks of the trees other shadows were continually co... ...ip of, perhaps, four thousand tons. Although upreared upon the summit of a wave more than a hundred times her own altitude, her apparent size exceeded...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Two

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...y confusedly, some miscellaneous letters and other papers, with one or two musical instruments and a few books. Here, however, after a long and very d... ..., even in Europe; and which has never been quoted, to my knowledge, by any American — if we except, perhaps, the author of the “Curiosities of America... ...he sea. It came toward us with inconceivable swift- ness, throwing up huge waves of foam around its breast, and illuminating all that part of the sea ... ... of Salem, Mass., presented the “Na- tional Institute” with an insect from New Zealand, with the following description: “ ‘The Hotte,a decided caterpi... ...y increasing sound, like the moan- ing of a vast herd of buffaloes upon an American prairie; and at the same moment I perceived that what seamen term ... ...tices among the Ferroe islands, “have no other cause than the collision of waves rising and falling, at flux and reflux, against a ridge of rocks and ... ...oam. The boat made a sharp half turn to larboard, and then shot off in its new direction like a thunderbolt. At the same moment the roaring noise of t... ...haps even more than to the orthodox and easily recognisable beau- ties, of musical science. I had learned, too, the very remark- able fact, that the s... ...elieved by occasional trees of gigantic height, growing singly or in small groups, both along the plateau and in the domain behind the wall, but in cl...

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Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...d has at the moment of restoration literally the force and liveliness of a new birth—the very same pang, and no whit feebler, as that which belonged t... ...o sudden life on our first awaking, and is to all in- tents and purposes a new and not an old affliction—one which brings with it the old original sho... ...after so long a voyage, she only, out of the total crew, was thrown on the American shore, with one hundred and five pounds in her purse of clear gain... ...foot of Kate’s little account. But unhappily for Kate’s début on this vast American stage, the case was otherwise. Mr. Urquiza had the misfortune (equ... ...to the morning air. Kate had now no time to send back her compliments in a musical halloo. The Alcalde missed break- ing his neck on this occasion ver... ... man. We have all heard of a king that, sitting on the sea-shore, bade the waves, as they began to lave his feet, upon their allegiance to retire. Tha... ...y which was to be. 3. The diffusive love, not such as rises and falls upon waves of life and mortality, not such as sinks and swells by undulations of... ...ch- ess on being hailed as Dauphiness, was a succession of the most tragic groups from the most awful section of the Gre- cian theatre. The next allia... ...ble expression of national ven- eration to the deceased, there was a grand musical service, most admirably performed, at the close of which Kant’s mor...

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Autobiography Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life

By: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

...g deeply in all the influences of his age, he has from the first, at every new ep- och, stood forth to elucidate the new circumstances of the time; to... ...portions widely different in character: the products of the first, once so new and original, have long either directly or through the thou- sand thous... ...ds of a master, compels a language which is as rich as Greek to be also as musical. The spring of 1773, which witnessed the publication of Götz, saw h... ...cene in Auerbach’s cellar. Egmont was also begun under the stimulus of the American Rebel- lion. A way of escaping from his embarrassments was unex- p... ... German house, which unhappily came to pass, as after his death the choice wavered only between the king of Spain (afterwards), Charles V ., and the k... ...art. Seven years he serves for his beloved, without impatience and without wavering. His father-in-law, crafty like himself, and disposed, like him, t... ...Huguenots, who settled there after the revocation of the edict of Nantes.— American Note. 235 Goethe me. Her ill health kept her constantly at home. ... ...e: and a man in a light jerkin was passing between the two above-mentioned groups, and, without troubling himself about them, directly up to the templ... ... on both the piano and the violin. The second, a true, good soul, likewise musical, enlivened the concerts which were often got up, no less than his e...

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The Brothers Karamazov

By: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky

...ur sorrow ,” scoff- ers said to him. Many even added that he was glad of a new comic part in which to play the buffoon, and that it was simply to make... ...d always hated his first mistress, Adelaida Ivanovna, took the side of his new mistress. He championed her cause, abus- ing Fyodor Pavlovitch in a man... ... eyes. The latter turned round, and noticing that Miusov was watching him, waved him a kiss. “Well, are you coming to the Superior?” Miusov asked Ivan... ...He used to dress up in a sheet as though it were a surplice, and sang, and waved some object over the dead cat as though it were a censer. All this he... ...d of Grushenka in a sort of rapture. She held out her hand with a charming musical, nervous little laugh, watched the “sweet young lady,” and obviousl... ... turned away, wringing his hands. Grushenka ran out of the house, laughing musically. Katerina Ivanovna went into a fit of hysterics. She sobbed, ... ... the witnesses for the defence and for the prosecution were separated into groups by the President, and whether it was arranged to call them in a cert... ..., already. Even though Grusha will be with me. Just look at her; is she an American? She is Russian, Russian to the marrow of her bones; she will be h... ...s soon as we’ve learnt it—good-bye to America! We’ll run here to Russia as American citizens. Don’t be uneasy—we would not 722 THE BROTHERS KARAMAZO...

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Resurrection

By: Mrs. Louis Maude

...of the cow. The young woman was lying in the cowshed with a fine, healthy, new-born baby. The old maiden lady scolded the maids again for allowing the... ...e court, gentlemen,” said the usher, pointing to the door, with an amiable wave of his hand. All moved towards the door, pausing to let each other pas... ... the stomach, and, according to his doctor’s advice, he had begun trying a new treatment, and this had kept him at home longer than usual. Now, as he ... ...broken in and fed by others. There, with other men like himself, he had to wave a sword, shoot off guns, and teach others to do the same. He had no ot... ... Well, our guessing was no use. The Lord willed otherwise,” she went on in musical tones. “Is it possible? Have they sentenced you?” asked Theodosia, ... ...ar artists.” “Yes, that’s so,” said the watchman’s wife, and ran on in her musical strain, “they’re like flies after sugar.” “And here, too,” Maslova ... ...veral jailers. In the next room sat about twenty persons, men and women in groups and in pairs, talking in low voices. There was a writing table by th... ...nd this is a thing not only we but many have been considering. There is an American, Henry George. This is what he has thought out, and I agree with h... ...lova’s would shape if she were acquitted. He remembered the thought of the American writer, Thoreau, who at the time when slavery existed in America s...

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The Public Domain : Enclosing the Commons of the Mind

By: James Boyle

...e The Public Domain Enclosing the Commons of the Mind Yale University Press New Haven & London ___-1 ___0 ___ 1 37278_u00.qxd 8/28/08 11:04 AM Pag... ...a brilliant composer, not only educated me in composition and the history of musical borrowing but co-taught a class on musical borrowing that dramati... ...” 2 For several years now I have been a columnist for the Financial Times’s “New Economy Policy Forum.” Portions of Chapter 5 and Chapter 9 had their ... ...s the emergence of an area of concern, the coming together of very different groups around a shared problem—an imbalance in the rules that define prop-... ...s? Even the ones they claim to have been dictated by gods or aliens? Even if American copyright law requires “an author,” presumably a human one? 9 Ca... ...r the films of the Second World War, or footage on the daily lives of African-Americans during segregation, or the music of the Great Depression, or th... ... create out of thin air. Perhaps he or she is deeply embedded in a literary, musical, cultural, or scientific tra- dition that would not flourish if tre... ...n them might help to explain both the problems and the stakes in the current wave of expansion. Unlike the earthy commons, the commons of the mind is ... ...you can quickly reach the same num- ber of ears that the payola-soaked radio waves allow the record companies to reach. One need not cheer Grokster. M...

... copyright, patent, and trademark laws. In a series of fascinating case studies, Boyle explains why gene sequences, basic business ideas and pairs of musical notes are now owned, why jazz might be illegal if it were invented today, why most of 20th century culture is legally unavailable to us, and why today's policies would probably have smothered the World Wide Web at its...

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Man and Superman a Comedy and a Philosophy

By: George Bernard Shaw

...knew your man. It is hardly fifteen years since, as twin pio- neers of the New Journalism of that time, we two, cradled in the same new sheets, made a... ...aperone; and even the Times must sometimes 4 GB Shaw thank its stars that new plays are not produced every day, since after each such event its gravi... ... and then disparage it as unworthy and indelicate. We laugh at the haughty American nation be- cause it makes the negro clean its boots and then prove... ...ng about our imperial destiny; but our eyes and hearts turn eagerly to the American millionaire. As his hand goes down to his pocket, our fingers go u... ...eantry, this effusive loyalty, this officious rising and uncover- ing at a wave from a flag or a blast from a brass band? Impe- rialism: Not a bit of ... ...’s like hearing an ironclad talk about being at the mercy of the winds and waves. OCTAVIUS. This is not fair, Jack. She is an orphan. And you ought to... ...it is impossible for us to under- take a joint arrangement. ANN. [in a low musical voice] Mamma— MRS WHITEFIELD. [hastily] Now, Ann, I do beg you not ... ...er for the day. Go as you please until morning. The Brigands disperse into groups lazily. Some go into the cave. Others sit down or lie down to sleep ... ... clarionet turning this tune into infinite sadness: (Here there is another musical staff.) The yellowish pallor moves: there is an old crone wandering...

...you to justify. You were of mature age when you made the suggestion; and you knew your man. It is hardly fifteen years since, as twin pioneers of the New Journalism of that time, we two, cradled in the same new sheets, made an epoch in the criticism of the theatre and the opera house by making it a pretext for a propaganda of our own views of life. So you cannot plead igno...

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The Awakening and Selected Short Stories

By: Kate Chopin

...ditorials and bits of news which he had not had time to read before quitting New Orleans the day before. Mr. Pontellier wore eye glasses. He was a man... ... there. Meanwhile he held on to his modest position in a mercantile house in New Orleans, where an equal familiarity with English, French and Spanish ... ...tion and her girlhood home in the old Kentucky bluegrass country. She was an American woman, with a small infusion of French which seemed to have been... ... peg outside the door. The hat rested any way on her yellow brown hair, that waved a little, was heavy, and clung close to her head. Madame Ratignolle... ...e won’t look up.” Madame Lebrun flew to the window. She called “Victor!” She waved a handkerchief and called again. The young fellow below got into th... ...self in her selections. Edna was what she herself called very fond of music. Musical strains, well rendered, had a way of evoking pictures in her mind... ... thought much about the sun when it was shining. The people walked in little groups toward the beach. They talked and laughed; some of them sang. Ther... ...of the time I have lost splashing about like a baby!” She would not join the groups in their sports and bouts, but intoxicated with her newly conquere... ... verse ended with “si tu savais.” Robert’s voice was not pretentious. It was musical and true. The voice, the notes, the whole refrain haunted her mem...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Five

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...- nies to twirl it by steam. Glare is a leading error in the philosophy of American house- hold decoration—an error easily recognised as deduced from ... ...ble flesh!” 16 EA Poe THE SPHINX DURING THE DREAD REIGN of the Cholera in New Y ork, I had accepted the invitation of a relative to spend a fortnight... ... frolics—often enacted among us, at our mas- querades: but here it will be new altogether. Unfortunately, however, it requires a company of eight pers... ...once put into new commotion, and overshadowed by a world of umbrellas. The waver, the jostle, and the hum in- creased in a tenfold degree. For my own ... ...- tween a London populace and that of the most frequented 35 V olume Five American city. A second turn brought us into a square, bril- liantly lighte... ...ong summer hours, The golden light should lie, And thick young herbs and groups of flowers Stand in their beauty by. The oriole should build and t... ...s, Descend along the shore, With bands of noble gentlemen, And banners waved before; And gentle youth and maidens gay, And snowy plumes they wor... ...me, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells From the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, b... ...y dripping, drop by drop, Upon the quiet mountain top. Steals drowsily and musically Into the univeral valley. The rosemary nods upon the grave; The l...

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The Varieties of Religious Experience

By: William James

...Brad- ley—The psychology of character-changes—Emo- tional excitements make new centres of personal en- ergy—Schematic ways of representing this— Starb... ...ted— Characteristics of the faith-state: sense of truth; the world appears new— Sensory and motor automatisms— Permanency of conversions. 7 William J... ... I take my place behind this desk, and face this learned au- dience. To us Americans, the experience of receiving instruction from the living voice, a... ...uous an act. Particularly must this be the case on a soil as sacred to the American imagination as that of Edinburgh. The glories of the philosophic c... ... for which we hunger, and we ride gladly 55 William James on every little wave that promises to bear us towards it.”[19] [19] The New Spirit, p. 232.... ...and around rue. The whole room seemed to me full of God. The air seemed to waver to and fro with the presence of Something I knew not what. I spoke wi... ...not as a moralist, and without a trace of sentimental- ism. He never makes groups and departments of the ills, he never spends time in asking whether ... ...ertain feeling, in what the quality or worth of it consists. One must have musical ears to know the value of a symphony; one must have been in love on... ...w York, 1846, p. 3. 369 William James of light on land and sea, odors and musical sounds, all bring it when the mind is tuned aright. Most of us can ...

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Sartor Resartus the Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdr Ockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

... was completed;—thereby, in these his seemingly so aimless rambles, planting new standards, founding new habitable colonies, in the immeasurable circu... ... to him; and then, by quite foreign suggestion. By the arrival, namely, of a new Book from Professor Teufelsdr¨ ockh of Weissnichtwo; treating express... ...lls; so that when a man walks, it is with contin ual jingling. Some few, of musical turn, have a whole chime of bells (Glocken 32 SARTOR RESARTUS s... ...with a Cupid for steersman! Consider their welts, a handbreadth thick, which waver round them by way of hem; the long flood of silver buttons, or rathe... ...hat of practical Reason’ proceeding by large Intuition over whole systematic groups and king doms; whereby, we might say, a noble complexity, almost ... ...ader may imagine. So much we can see; darkly, as through the foliage of some wavering thicket: a youth of no common endowment, who has passed happily ... ...tual hand grips with Destiny herself, may have comported himself among these Musical and Literary dilettanti of both sexes, like a hungry lion invited... ...t as articulately perhaps as the case admitted. Or call him, if you will, an American Backwoodsman, who had to fell unpenetrated forests, and bat tle... ..., considerably involved in haze. To the first English Edition, 1838, which an American, or two American had now opened the way for, there was slighting...

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Democracy and Education

By: John Dewey

...ion we speak of the life of a savage tribe, of the Athenian people, of the American nation. “Life” covers customs, institutions, beliefs, victories an... ...ne hand, there 7 John Dewey is the contrast between the immaturity of the new-born members of the group —its future sole representatives— and the mat... ...bers who com- pose a society lived on continuously, they might educate the new-born members, but it would be a task directed by personal interest rath... ...nd of education—that of direct tuition or schooling. In undeveloped social groups, we find very little formal teaching and training. Savage groups mai... .... What is strange or foreign (that is to say outside the activities of the groups) tends to be morally forbidden and intellectually suspect. It seems ... ...e members of any group while it is isolated. The assimilative force of the American public school is eloquent testimony to the effi- cacy of the commo... ...ean- ingless transition unless it is consciously connected with the return wave of consequences which flow from it. When an activity is continued into... ...e action of the piano directed to accomplish the purpose of the piano as a musical instrument. It is the same with “pedagogical” method. The only diff... ...ano may produce, and the variations in technique required in the different musical results secured. Method in any case is but an effective way of empl...

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Getting Married and Preface to Getting Married

By: George Bernard Shaw

...VIII. procured his divorce from Katharine of Arragon to the pleas on which American wives obtain divorces (for instance, “mental anguish” caused by th... ... is there in marriage that makes the thoughtful people so uncomfortable? A NEW ATTACK ON MARRIAGE The answer to this question is an answer which every... ...- fashioned newspapers with effort, and were just taking with avidity to a new sort of paper, costing a halfpenny, which they believed to be extraordi... ...hich they called education; and of keeping pianos in their houses, not for musical purposes, but to torment their daugh- ters with a senseless stupidi... ...he street traffic to be or to know any better than the people who obey the wave of his hand. All concerted action involves subordi- nation and the app... ...h parties as in Sweden, not to mention the experiments made by some of the American States, would have shaken society to its foundations. Yet they hav... ...e repeated here that no law, however stringent, can prevent polygamy among groups of people who choose to live loosely and be monogamous only in appea... ... out now. Mrs Collins knows. MRS GEORGE [a faint convulsion passing like a wave over her] I know more than either of you. One of you has not yet exhau...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Four

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...he Nopolis Tea-Pot’—as nearly as I can recollect, this was the name of the new paper. The leading article, I must admit, was brilliant—not to say seve... ...alighted like a bombshell among the hitherto peaceful citizens of Nopolis. Groups of excited individuals gathered at the corners of the streets. Every... ...ent to his lately-ac- quired charger —an attachment which seemed to attain new strength from every fresh example of the animal’s ferocious and demon-l... ...- dications of refined taste, many books, drawings, pots of flow- ers, and musical instruments. A cheerful fire blazed upon the hearth. At a piano, si... ...en I say that it bore resemblance to the fervid, chanting, monotonous, yet musical sermonic manner of Coleridge), I perceived symp- toms of even more ... ...ously laid by itself “solitary and alone” (excuse me for quoting the great American poet Benton!), as a guarantee of the magnani- mous intention. We a... ...it. The truth is, I labored under the disadvantage of having no monkey—and American streets are so muddy, and a Democratic rabble is so obstrusive, an... ...former situation, assumes the next move himself. Upon beating the game, he waves his head with an air of triumph, looks round compla- cently upon the ... ...le not now with such thoughts. To-morrow we will speak of this. Y our mind wavers, and its agitation will find relief in the exercise of simple memori...

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The Analysis of Mind

By: Bertrand Russell

...ight be secured. It was believed also that from writers mainly British and American fuller consideration of English Philosophy than it had hith- erto ... ...dley, Stout, Bertrand Russell, Baldwin, Urban, Montague, and others, and a new interest in foreign works, German, French and Italian, which had either... ...nti-materialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the “stuff” of the world is neith... ...ialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the “stuff” of the world is neither mental... ...pot, my heart first stops, then palpitates, and my legs respond to the air-waves falling on my tympanum by quickening their movements. If I stumble as... ...all the “stuff” of the mind, and that everything else can be analysed into groups of sensations related in various ways, or characteristics of sensa- ... ...nsations related in various ways, or characteristics of sensa- tions or of groups of sensations. As regards belief, I shall give grounds for this view... ...say a second. Then, according to physics, what happens is that a spherical wave of light travels outward from the star through space, just as, when yo... ... learn to understand a concept as we learn to walk, dance, fence or play a musical instrument: it is a habit, i.e. an organized memory. General terms ...

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