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The Lady of the Lake

By: William J. Rolfe

...ing with affright, Recalled the vision of the night. The hearth’s decaying brands were red And deep and dusky lustre shed, Half showing, half conceali... ... rival glared, With foot advanced and blade half bared. XXXV . Ere yet the brands aloft were flung, Margaret on Roderick’s mantle hung, And Malcolm he... ...rd the vassals took, With forward step and fiery look, On high their naked brands they shook, Their clattering targets wildly strook; And first in ... ...e, chilled with watching, spread their hands O’er the huge chimney’s dying brands, While round them, or beside them flung, At every step their harness... ...is hest their desperate hold, But either still on other glared,” etc. 795. Brands. A pet word with Scott. Note how often it has been used already in t... ...ht enable him to do it justice,—I mean my friend Mr. Francis Douce, of the British Museum, whose usual kindness will, I hope, par- don my mentioning h...

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Marmion a Tale of Flodden Field

By: Sir Walter Scott

...mn gloom, That shrouds, O Pitt, thy hallowed tomb! Deep graved in every British heart, Oh never let those names depart! Say to your sons—Lo, here h... ...banner proud to stand, Looked up the noblest of the land, Till through the British world were known The names of Pitt and Fox alone. Spells of such fo... ...vision high, He might not view with waking eye. The mightiest chiefs of British song Scorned not such legends to prolong: They gleam through Spense... ...n the morning air, The wreaths of failing smoke declare, To embers now the brands decayed, Where the night-watch their fires had made. They saw, slow ...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 5 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... were desirous of regulating their own concerns in their own way, that the British Government should not interfere; that at one 50 The Writings of Ab... ...50 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Five time they struggled with the British Government to be permit- ted to exclude the African slave trade,—if... ..., Illinois, Michigan, and Wisconsin, was acquired first, I believe, by the British Gov- ernment, in part at least, from the French. Before the estab- ... ...; dark complexion, with coarse black hair and gray eyes. No other marks or brands recollected. Y ours truly, A. LINCOLN. ON NOMINATION TO THE NATIONAL... ...but a case occurring under peculiar circum- stances. The gunpowder plot of British history, though not connected with slaves, was more in point. In th... ...apoleon’s cavalry had charged again and again upon the unbroken squares of British infantry, at last they were giving up the attempt, and going off in...

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The Last of the Mohicans, A Narrative of 1757

By: James Fenimore Cooper

...e danger into which he was heedlessly running, saved the rem- nants of the British army, on this occasion, by his decision and courage. The reputation... ...ng of a summer sun. The 10 The Last of the Mohicans loyal servants of the British crown had given to one of these forest-fastnesses the name of Willi... ...or- tage with his savages, every yell and whoop from whom rang through the British encampment, chilling the hearts of men who were already but too muc... ...er close in the face as he passed him, still continuing his way toward the British fortification. The man started; his arms rattled heavily as he thre... ...s, until the last laggard of the camp was at his post; but the instant the British fifes had blown their shrill signal, they became mute. In the meant... ...came to a place where the party of Le Renard had made a halt. Extinguished brands were lying around a spring, the offals of a deer were scattered abou... ...reality as possible, one of the boldest of their number had conveyed a few brands into some piles of tree-tops that had hitherto escaped the burning. ...

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The Pioneers Or, The Sources of the Susquehanna a Descriptive Tale

By: James Fenimore Cooper

...ure maintenance. Major Effingham, in declin- ing the liberal offers of the British ministry, had subjected himself to the suspicion of having attained... ...t inhabitants of the forest remained also standing before the extinguished brands, probably from an unwillingness to depart without his comrades. The ... ...gain, there was a hole under your lee-quarter big enough to hold the whole British navy.” “Oh! for massy’s sake! and wa’n’t you afeard, Benjamin? and ... ...matter, can talk the language almost as well as myself, or any native-born British subject. Y ou’ve forgot your schooling, and the young mistress is a... ...pper stoutly; “I can say that I have, and tell no lie.” “Did’ee ever see a British ship, Master Kirby? an English line-of-battle ship, boy? Where did’... ... 231 James Fenimore Cooper or he must have made a valuable officer to the British marine. It is no wonder that they overcame the French so easily on ... ...gloom of the eastern mountain. Its motion ceased suddenly; a scattering of brands was in the air, and then all remained dark as the conjunction of nig... ...f the bushes, as they worked their way cautiously among the unextinguished brands. At the first short cessation in the rain, Oliver conducted Elizabet...

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The Black Dwarf

By: Sir Walter Scott

...ven the alarm of England, as it seemed to point at a separation of the two British kingdoms, after the decease of Queen Anne, the reign- ing sovereign... ...the three days’ amusement of my kindred tribe, at the very moment when the brands were lighted, the pincers heated, the cauldrons boiling, the knives ...

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The Scarlet Letter

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...et the captains of the rusty little schooners that bring firewood from the British provinces; a rough looking set of tarpaulins, without the alertness... ...been carried off to Halifax, when all the king’s officials accompanied the British army in its flight from Bos ton. It has often been a matter of reg... ...the pang of it will be always in her heart.” “What do we talk of marks and brands, whether on the bodice of her gown or the flesh of her forehead?” cr...

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Sandra Belloni Originally Emilia in England

By: George Meredith

...her side of her, she commenced thrumming a kind of Giles Scroggins, native British, beer-begotten air, while Jim smeared his mouth and grinned, as one... ...thed hair that had the gloss of black briony leaves, and eyes like burning brands in a cave; while T racy’s hair was red as blown flame, with eyes of ... ...ounced military habit of speech and bearing, that he was at heart fervidly British. His age was about fifty: a man of great force of shoulder and pote... ... Adela’s ear, designating Mr. Pericles. “Does he know Mr. Wilfrud’s in the British army, and a new lieuten’t, gazetted and all?” Mr. Pericles certainl...

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Arthurian Chronicles : Roman de Brut

By: Eugene Mason

...r place in chronicle history in a form that persisted throughout the later British historical annals. His theme and his manner of presenting it were b... ...ge that knew no printed books. Not only was it accepted as an authority by British historians, but French chroniclers also used it for their own purpo... ...to it by scribes because of its connection with Brutus, the founder of the British race. The Brut is a reproduction in verse of Geoffrey’s Historia. ... ... pion, or he had fallen at the stroke. The two closed together, with naked brands and lifted shields, smiting and guarding. Men forgot to fight, and s... ...hought has disturbed me, that peace and soft living are rot ting away the British bone. Idleness is the stepdame of vir tue, as our preachers have o... ...should rather pay trib ute to us. In olden days there lived two brothers, British born, namely, Belinus, King of the Britons, and Brennus, Duke of Bu... ...se who sat at his table. Kay and Bedevere smote like pala dins with their brands of steel. Many fair deeds had they done, but none so fair as they di... ...ore the other. Pieces were hewn from the buckler, and sparks flew from the brands. They joined together, smiting above and thrusting under, two perfec...

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Waverley or Tis Sixty Years Since

By: Sir Walter Scott

... and sombre library, with no other light than was afforded by the decaying brands on its ponderous and ample hearth, he would exercise for hours that ... ... round him; but all was still solitary. If it had not been for the decayed brands of the fire, now sunk into grey ashes, and the remnants of the festi... ...—”Better an old woman with a purse in her hand, than three men with belted brands?”’ Then, turning to the company, he proposed the ‘Health of Captain ... ...g. The ruthless proscription of party seems to degrade the victims whom it brands, however unjustly. But let us hope that a brighter day is approachin... ...al cause of their being written, without a glance into the interior of the British Cabinet at the period in question. The Ministers of the day happene... ...at he protested he could beat any known march or point of war known in the British army, and had accordingly commenced with ‘Dumbarton’s Drums,’ when ... ...I remember his successor in office, a member of that enlightened body, the British Convention: be his memory, therefore, treated with due respect. CHA... ... the utmost, were armed, to change the fate, and alter the dynasty, of the British kingdoms. As he moved along the column, which still remained sta- t... ...at ardent spirit, who thought it little to cut a way for his master to the British throne! Ambition, policy, bravery, all far beyond their sphere, her...

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The Iliad of Homer

By: Pope, Alexander, 1688-1744

...t description of this monument will be found in Vaux’s “Antiquities of the British Museum,” p. 198 sq. The monument itself (T owneley Sculptures, No. ... ...pacted troops stand wedged in firm array, A dreadful front! they shake the brands, and threat With long-destroying flames the hostile fleet. The king ... ... rojans! lend your valiant hands, Haste to the fleet, and toss the blazing brands!” They hear, they run; and, gathering at his call, Raise scaling eng... ...bold T rojan arm’d his daring hands, Against the sable ships, with flaming brands, So well the chief his naval weapon sped, The luckless warrior at hi... ...treats. Then swift from all sides pour 306 The Iliad of Homer The hissing brands; thick streams the fiery shower; O’er the high stern the curling vol... ...rts fly round him from a hundred hands, And the red terrors of the blazing brands: Till late, reluctant, at the dawn of day Sour he departs, and quits...

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Jane Eyre

By: Charlotte Brontë

...ore a long and lamentable blast. I returned to my book—Bewick’s History of British Birds: the letterpress thereof I cared little for, generally speaki... ...impression her injustice seems to have made on your heart! No ill-usage so brands its record on my feelings. Would you not be happier if you tried to ... ... was the answer; “and, ‘comme cela,’ she charmed my English gold out of my British breeches’ pocket. I have been green, too, Miss Eyre,—ay , grass gre... ...re, so much was I flattered by this preference of the Gallic sylph for her British gnome, that I installed her in an hotel; gave her a complete establ... ...t the bookcases, I thought I could distinguish the two volumes of Bewick’s British Birds occupying their old place on the third shelf, and Gulliver’s ... ...odest, and well-informed young women as could be found in the ranks of the British peasantry. And 395 Charlotte Brontë that is saying a great deal; f...

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The Daisy Chain: Or, Aspirations : A Family Chronicle

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...t. “It will be very pleasant if he can go with you. How he would enjoy the British Mu- seum, if there was time for him to see it! Have you said any- t... ...e Dr. May went to transact some business, Norman had been with Alan at the British Mu- seum, and though he had intended to see half London be- sides, ... ...the ground—a cloud of smoke, black figures were flitting round it, pushing brands into red places, and feeding the bonfire. “What have you been doing?... ...gings in London, near the old hospital, per- haps—and go and turn over the British Museum library.” “Look you here, Spencer, I have a much better plan... .... May. “A garden the length of this one—” “But I say—I want to be near the British Museum.” “Take a season-ticket, and run up once a week.” “I shall t...

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Cymbeline

By: Dramatis Personae

...vant to Posthumus. CORNELIUS: a physician. A Roman Captain. (Captain:) Two British Captains. A Frenchman, friend to Philario. Frenchman. Two Lords o... ...nking Cupids Of silver, each on one foot standing, nicely Depending on their brands. POSTHUMUS LEONATUS: This is her honor! Let it be granted ... ...y end Can make good use of either: she being down, I have the placing of the British crown. [Re enter CLOTEN .] How now, my son! CLOTEN: ... ...rom one side, LUCIUS, IACHIMO, and the Roman Army: from the other side, the British Army; POSTHUMUS LEONATUS following, like a poor soldier. They mar... ...unt.] SCENE III: Another part of the field. [Enter POSTHUMUS LEONATUS and a British Lord .] Lord: Camest thou from where they made the stand? POSTHU... ...re I’ll keep nor bear again, But end it by some means for Imogen. [Enter two British Captains and Soldiers .] First Captain : Great Jupiter be praise...

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Island Nights Entertainments

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...onjour out of me,” said I. “You tell them who I am. I’m a white man, and a British subject, and no end of a big chief at home; and I’ve come here to d... ...them plain that I demand the reason of this treatment as a white man and a British subject.” That was my speech. I know how to deal with Kanakas: give... ...– I’m just a trader; I’m just a common, low-down, God-damned white man and British subject, the sort you would like to wipe your boots on. I hope that... ...and so there was. “There!” said I. “Look at that! ‘London: Printed for the British and Foreign Bible Society, Blackfriars,’ and the date, which I can’... ...ck the way I expected. For the whole wood was scattered with red coals and brands from the explosion; they were all round me on the flat; some had fal... ...which they 87 Island Nights’ Entertainments did accordingly, opposite the British Consul’s, to make a great parade of money, and themselves conspicuo...

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In the Days of the Comet

By: H. G. Wells

...ad once been very terrible; there was a devil, who was also ex officio the British King’s enemy, and much denunciation of the wicked lusts of the fles... ...g.” The American ironmasters were now dumping on the Brit- ish market. The British employers were, of course, taking their loss out of their workpeopl... ...gible confu- sions that were matter of fact to their fathers. Here were we British, forty-one millions of people, in a state of almost indescribably a... ...isibly spitting upon my faultless country’s colors. Somebody had hoisted a British flag on the right bank of some tropical river I had never heard of ... ...n it down. Then one of the con- venient abundant natives of the country, a British subject indisputably, had been shot in the leg. But the facts were ... ...t last the clowning of the booth opened and revealed—hunger and suffering, brands burning and swords and shame… . These men had come to fame and power...

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American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

...or an answer. ‘Yes. Every house without a signal will be fired upon by the British troops. No harm will be done to the others. No harm at all. Those t... ...try at home, as the distinguished gentleman who is now its Minister at the British Court sustains its highest character abroad. I visited both houses ... ...dical College; and the Battle Monument in memory of an engagement with the British at North Point; are the most conspicuous among them. American Notes... ... the great things to be seen there. When I told him of that chamber in the British Museum wherein are preserved household memorials of a race that cea... ...tever, between the social fea tures of the United States and those of the British Pos sessions in Canada. For this reason, I shall confine my self ... ...shed flesh, and missing teeth, and lacerated backs, and bites of dogs, and brands of red hot irons innumerable: but as my readers will be sufficiently...

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The Poems

By: George Meredith

...ed the sky. THE HEAD OF BRAN THE BLEST I When the Head of Bran Was firm on British shoulders, God made a man! Cried all beholders. Steel could not res... ...cupation Can’t rob you of your own esteem, old rat! I’ll preach you to the British nation. SONG Should thy love die; O bury it not under ice-blue eyes... ... less generous, he would oppress, He would chain me, upbraid me, burn deep brands for hate, Than with this mask of freedom and gorgeousness Bespangle ... ...llow flamed the meady sunset; Red runs up the flag of morn. Signal for the British onset Hiccups through the British horn. Down these hillmen pour lik...

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An Outcast of the Islands

By: Joseph Conrad

...lem.” 149 Joseph Conrad “But, hang it all!” exclaimed Lingard—”Abdulla is British!” “Abdulla wasn’t there at all—did not go on shore that day. Yet Al... ...en their decaying walls. His wandering feet stumbled against the blackened brands of extinct fires, kick- ing up a light black dust of cold ashes that...

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The Two Brothers Tranlated by Katharine Prescott Wormeley

By: Honoré de Balzac

... religious principles taught her to think that all women on the stage were brands in the burning; moreover, she thought, and so did Madame Descoings, ... ... to the Admiralty, was made the basis of a remonstrance on the part of the British government with Spain on the subject of its cruelties. Sir Charles ...

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