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Tokyo to Tijuana: Gabriele Departing America

By: Steven David Justin Sills

...on ceremonies or reading their mandates became irrelevant. Yang Lin, parting from their movement toward the steps that led toward the Royal Museum, be... ...tely something that was not wanted. It stayed with him on the bus. On a ride from the Nambu Bus Terminal to Chongju, Sang Huin's sleep was spastic lik... ...voice cried out to him like locusts from the branches of trees. There was a hot sticky childish oozing within him. Within dreams his fortitude was li... ...ephone clicked off. Sang Huin felt hurt. He felt a morbid clarity behind how people always left his life. He thought about what he "knew" of this Chin... ...ing only in personal interactions? Was he nothing but the composite of other people's impressions of him? These impressions--these judgments-- could n... ... to compare others with. In Japan women who left their children locked up in hot cars were rarely accused of the crime of manslaughter; and in Korea t... ...tloaves, potatoes, and onion rings; bi bi bop and kimchi chige; that trip to Arkansas at a distant relative's house and how he and his sister had play... ... by the most winding and treacherous roads until they were at last in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. On the third day of Christmas he gave to her the rever... ...day it was Christmas and so they decided to travel around the area of Eureka Springs. They drove up and down the niveous and tortuous hills in and ou...

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Life on the Mississippi

By: Mark Twain

...nce six times, the British Is lands or Italy ten times. Conceptions formed from the river basins of Western Europe are rudely shocked when we con ... ...con sider the extent of the valley of the Mississippi; nor are those formed from the sterile basins of the great rivers of Siberia, the lofty plateau... ...psed since the river took its place in history. The belief of the scientific people is, that the mouth used to be at Baton Rouge, where the hills ceas... ...d fifty years there had been white settlements on our Atlantic coasts. These people were in intimate communication with the Indians: in the south the ... ...ies with another party of Indians; and at last they reached the mouth of the Arkansas (about a month out from their start ing point), where a tribe o... ...ssippi Mark T wain 13 basin of the Mississippi, from its frozen northern springs to the sultry borders of the Gulf; from the woody ridges of the A... ... thunder! When I’m cold, I bile the Gulf of Mexico and bathe in it; when I’m hot I fan myself with an equinoctial storm; when I’m thirsty I reach up a... ... and he shuffled from one side of his wheel to the other as if the floor was hot. He would boil a while to himself, and then overflow and scald me aga... ...Pretty soon after that I was sick, and used up, and had to go off to the Hot Springs. When there, I got a good many letters from commanders saying the...

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Moby Dick; Or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

...s not true.” —Hackluyt “Whale. ... Sw. and Dan. Hval. This animal is named from roundness or rolling; for in Dan. Hvalt is arched or vaulted.” —W ebst... ...ed or vaulted.” —W ebster’ s Dictionary “Whale. ... It is more immediately from the Dut. and Ger. wallen; a.s. walw-ian, to roll, to wallow.” —Richard... ...— Montgomery’ s World before the Flood. “Io! Paean! Io! sing. To the finny people’s king. Not a mightier whale than this In the vast Atlantic is; Not ... ...me from deliberately stepping into the street, and methodically knock- ing people’s hats off—then, I account it high time to get to sea as soon as I c... ...w that I recall all the circumstances, I think I can see a little into the springs and motives which being cun- ningly presented to me under various d... ...ght be nothing but a good coat of tropical tanning; but I never heard of a hot sun’s tanning a white man into a purplish yellow one. How- ever, I had ... ...he cannibal, while his horrid flourishings of the toma- hawk scattered the hot tobacco ashes about me till I thought my linen would get on fire. But t... ...eizing the line-knife from his broken prow, had dashed at the whale, as an Arkansas duellist at his foe, blindly seeking with a six inch blade to reac... ... curious touches at the whale, where all manner of spouts, jets d’eau, hot springs and cold, Saratoga and Baden-Baden, come bubbling up from his unexh...

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This Publication of Mark Twains the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

By: Mark Twain

... This illustration and the one on the cover are from a Nineteenth Century edition of Mark Twain‘s The Adven tures of Hu... ...then I didn’t care no more about him, because I don’t take no stock in dead people. Pretty soon I wanted to smoke, and asked the widow to let me. But... ...clean, and I must try to not do it any more. That is just the way with some people. They get down on a thing when they don’t know nothing about it. ... ...hing to it; but he never told what it was he said to it. Niggers would come from all around there and give Jim anything they had, just for a sight o... ...ried him. When breakfast was ready we lolled on the grass and eat it smoking hot. Jim laid it in with all his might, for he was most about starved. T... ...nt to be nowhere else but here. Pass me along another hunk of fish and some hot corn bread.” “Well, you wouldn’t a ben here ‘f it hadn’t a ben for Ji... ...em cheats so you can throw a dog through it anywheres; then the nice breeze springs up, and comes fanning you from over there, so cool and fresh and ... ... carryin’ on like that when he’s drunk. He’s the best naturedest old fool in Arkansas — never hurt nobody, drunk nor sober.” Boggs rode up before the ...

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The Confidence- Man

By: Herman Melville

...-bag, nor parcel. No porter followed him. He was unaccompanied by friends. From the shrugged shoul- ders, titters, whispers, wonderings of the crowd, ... ...or the capture of a mysterious impostor, supposed to have recently arrived from the East; quite an original genius in his vocation, as would appear, t... ...the elbows and toes of the crowd, he concluded his opera- tions by bidding people stand still more aside, when, jumping on a stool, he hung over his d... ...eece and good-natured, honest black face rubbing against the upper part of people’s thighs as he made shift to shuffle about, making music, such as it... ...wd suddenly come to be all justiciaries in the same case themselves; as in Arkansas once, a man proved guilty, by law, of murder, but whose condemnati... ...ing from the same root with disbelief of reli- gion, is twin with that. It springs from the same root, I say; for, set aside materialism, and what is ... ...ne, at sight of which proceeding the barber mechanically filled a cup with hot water from a copper vessel over a spirit-lamp, “for instance, now, supp...

...white fur one, with a long fleecy nap. He had neither trunk, valise, carpet-bag, nor parcel. No porter followed him. He was unaccompanied by friends. From the shrugged shoulders, titters, whispers, wonderings of the crowd, it was plain that he was, in the extremest sense of the word, a stranger....

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Across the Plains

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...oss The Plains by Robert Louis Stevenson CHAPTER I ACROSS THE PLAINS LEA VES FROM THE NOTEBOOK OF AN EMIGRANT BETWEEN NEW YORK AND SAN FRANCISCO MONDA... ...; and as there is no emigrant train on Sunday a great part of the passengers from these four ships was concentrated on the train by which I was to tra... ...n shouted to them to move on, and threatened them with shipwreck. These poor people were under a spell of stupor, and did not stir a foot. It rained a... ...ss, like that produced by fear, presided over the disorder of our land- ing. People pushed, and elbowed, and ran, their families fol- lowing how they ... ... in fact, and not merely in fancy, farther from the orient of Aurora and the springs of day. I thought so then, by the railroad side in Pennsylvania, ... ..., translated names of cities, where the Missis- sippi runs by T ennessee and Arkansas; and both, while I was crossing the continent, lay, watched by a... ... ponderous tomes of Bancroft, weighed me 12 Across the Plains double; I was hot, feverish, painfully athirst; and there was a great darkness over me,... ...ts and ate a hearty breakfast of por- ridge, with sweet milk, and coffee and hot cakes, at Burlington upon the Mississippi. Another long day’s ride fo... ...ed your knees. Or you might explore the tidal rocks, above all in the ebb of springs, when the very roots of the hills were for the nonce discov- ered...

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American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

... in the Republic than I had, when I landed in America. I purposely abstain from extending these observations to any length. I have nothing to defend, ... ...y, with a modest yet most magnificent sense of its limited dimensions, had from the first opined would not hold more than two enormous portmanteaus in... ...art shock before com ing below, which, but that we were the most sanguine people living, might have prepared us for the worst. The imaginative artist... ... little washing slab as standing room, — we could manage to insinuate four people into it, all at one time; and entreating each other to observe how v... ...ember of the little party having as much likeness to his natural mirth, as hot house peas at five guineas the quart, resemble in flavour the growth of... ...mfortable cordial; and nothing better occurring to me, at the moment, than hot brandy and water, I procured a tumbler full without delay. It being im... ... are something like the French coaches, but not nearly so good. In lieu of springs, they are hung on bands of the strongest leather. There is very lit... ..., and he sunk, to rise no more!’ American Notes – Dickens 251 ‘MURDER IN ARKANSAS. ‘We understand that a severe rencontre came off a few days sinc...

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The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

...ion in The Atlantic Monthly, where it began to appear in 1880. It differed from its two predecessors, however, in finding a course also open to it, fr... ...it of a Lady merely to help him out with a lame phrase; they draw him away from his small question to their own greater ones; so that, after a little,... ...ving ‘story’ enough. I seem to myself to have as much as I need—to show my people, to exhibit their relations with each other; for that is all my meas... ...the artist’s prime sensibility, which is the soil out of which his subject springs. The quality and capacity of that soil, its ability to “grow” with ... ... attendants and enter- 15 Henry James tainers who come down by train when people in the coun- try give a party; they represented the contract for car... ... obliged to you for calling me a duck. How’s your tea?” “Well, it’s rather hot.” “That’s intended to be a merit.” “Ah, there’s a great deal of merit,”... ...my mother has thoroughly mastered the art of condensation. ‘Tired America, hot weather awful, return England with niece, first steamer decent cabin.’ ... ...acquaintance I had made upon the steamer; a lovely group from Little Rock, Arkansas. In spite of that I felt cramped—I felt something pressing upon me...

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Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

By: Charles Dickens

...have just set down. It is this: I have never touched a character precisely from the life, but some coun- terpart of that character has incredulously a... ...o born and so bred, admired for that which made him hateful, and justified from his cradle in cunning, treachery, and avarice; I claim him as the legi... ...workhouses, and judge whether those are monsters who disgrace our streets, people our hulks and penitentiaries, and overcrowd our penal colonies, or a... ...what is ridiculous or wrong at home, so I then hoped that the good-humored people of the United States would not be generally disposed to quarrel with... ...anvil. The gleaming iron, in its emulation, sparkled too, and shed its red-hot gems around profusely . The strong smith and his men dealt such strokes... ... morning, with as much regularity as any tame single gentleman expects his hot roll, but rest content with the society of idle bachelors and roving ma... ...hostly little churchyard, all overgrown with such straggling vegetation as springs up spontaneously from damp, and graves, and rubbish. In some of the... ...was so chawed up; and the last Ala- bama gouging case; and the interesting Arkansas dooel with Bowie knives; and all the Political, Commercial, and Fa...

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A Courageous Battle

By: Susan Bracken

...gotta go, worm?” Tears forming, she tried to push past him as she felt the hot liquid trickle in her pants. She hung her head and forced her way into ... ...” Roger hissed, and she scuttled back to her house, tears falling again on hot, red cheeks. Numb with self-loathing, she took her books up to her bed ... ...concentration. Lacey’s father was a salesman whose territory took him away from home most days of the week. On weekends he went shopping for food and ... ...ornful name-calling. She rejoiced every June when summer offered a respite from the bullying. Lacey spent entire days sprawled on her bed engrossed in... ...ats. They sat in the car and watched kids climbing on the monkey bars, and people lined up to buy ice cream. “Hey,” Lacey said. “I just thought of som... ...oo. I was scared of advertising it for sale because I did not want strange people coming to the house. Now I will not have to worry. Will you take me ... ... went up the Queensland coast by bus to Cairns and then back down to Alice Springs. I bussed and hiked into New South Wales where there are almost no ... ... sitting next to Jana said their names were Margaret and Jean. “We’re from Arkansas. I guess it’s cold in Canada now.” “Yes,” answered Jana, trying to...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 6 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...h the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have the authority to detail from the retired list of the navy for the command of squad- rons and single... ...uch as you, than to me. It is upon the brave hearts and strong arms of the people of the country that our reliance has been placed in support of free ... ...o as to give the greatest protection to this capital which may be possible from that distance. [Indorsement.] TO THE SECRET ARY OF W AR: The President... ...e na- 12 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Six tion to the States and people most immediately interested in the subject-matter. To the people of ... ... South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, Mississippi, Arkansas, Tennes- see, North Carolina, and the State of Virginia except the... ... Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Missis- sippi, Louisiana, Texas, and Arkansas in an orderly manner seize and use any property, real or personal,... ... paying toll at the crossing of any national boundary. Our national strife springs not from our permanent part; not from the land we inhabit; not from... ...over the Big Black and cutting Loring off and driving him south to Crystal Springs, twenty-five miles below Jackson. Joe Johnston telegraphed all this... ...y is questioned, and motives are assailed. Actual war coining, blood grows hot and blood is spilled. Thought is forced from old channels into confusio...

...cember, 1861, provides: ?That the President of the United States by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, shall have the authority to detail from the retired list of the navy for the command of squadrons and single ships such officers as he may believe that the good of the service requires to be thus placed in command; and such officers may, if upon the recommenda...

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A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

By: Mark Twain

...ss of his company — for he did all the talking. We fell together, as modest people will, in the tail of the herd that was being shown through, and he... ...s?” I said I had not heard of it. He was so little interested — just as when people speak of the weather — that he did not notice whether I made him ... ...” Then, after a pause, added: “I did it myself.” By the time I had recovered from the electric surprise of this remark, he was gone. All that evening ... ...rain beat upon the windows, and the wind roared about the eaves and corners. From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory’s enchanting book, ... ...e him a pipe and a chair, and made him welcome. I also comforted him with a hot Scotch whisky; gave him another one; then still another — hoping alw... ... and fling furtive glances at Sir Launcelot that would have got him shot in Arkansas, to a dead certainty. Everybody praised the valor and magnanimi... ...s got down to a certain point there comes a revulsion, and he rallies. Hope springs up, and cheerfulness along with it, and then he is in good shape... ..., and dev A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court Mark Twain 58 ils hot from perdition, let alone such poor adversaries as these I was after,... ...not above medium size, but he was alert, slender limbed, muscled with watch springs, and just a greyhound to go. He was a beauty, glossy as silk, and...

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North America Volume One

By: Anthony Trollope

............................................................. 115 CHAPTER IX: FROM NIAGARA TO THE MISSISSIPPI............................................... ............................................................. 303 CHAPTER XX: FROM BOSTON TO WASHINGTON .................................................... ...e those against whom a writer does not intend to give a favorable verdict; people and places whom he desires to describe, on the peril of his own judg... ...general feelings of England to have been be- fore I found myself among the people by whom it was being waged. It is very difficult for the people of a... ...ew words in politics with those around him, till drop by drop the pleasant springs of his liberty creep into his mind and water his heart; and thus, e... ...see it, and, see- ing it, should speak out her true opinion.” The North is hot with such thoughts as these; and one cannot wonder that she should be a... ... husband, and Jones entreats the good offices of my wife in moderating the hot temper of his own. But we know better than that. If we interfere, the c... ...stem lies between the States of Tennessee and Missouri, of Mississippi and Arkansas, and through the State of Louisiana. The ancient province so calle... ...e been truly foreseen with a cunning eye, then a great and prosperous city springs up, ready made as it were, from the earth. Such a town is Milwaukee...

...HAPTER VIII: NORTH AND WEST ......................................................................................................... 115 CHAPTER IX: FROM NIAGARA TO THE MISSISSIPPI .................................................................................. 130 CHAPTER X: THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI ............................................................................

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Leaves of Grass

By: Walt Whitman

..............23 BOOK II............................................24 Starting from Paumanok.....................24 BOOK III............................... ...OK IV. CHILDREN OF ADAM ...103 To the Garden the World...................103 From Pent Up Aching Rivers............103 I Sing the Body Electric.......... ... inure to themselves as much as to any—what a paradox appears their age, How people respond to them, yet know them not, How there is something relentl... ..., Countless masses debouch upon them, They are now cover’d with the foremost people, arts, institutions, known. See, projected through time, For me an... ...I see in them and myself the same old law. The press of my foot to the earth springs a hundred affections, They scorn the best I can do to relate them... ...Red river or through those drain’d by the Tennessee, or through those of the Arkansas, Torches shine in the dark that hangs on the Chattahooche or Alt... ...ld digging, girdling the trees of a new purchase, Scorch’d ankle deep by the hot sand, hauling my boat down the shallow river, Where the panther walks... ...er and adventure, Hurrying with the modern crowd as eager and fickle as any, Hot toward one I hate, ready in my madness to knife him, Solitary at midn... ...e and murky clouds out belching from thy smoke stack, Thy knitted frame, thy springs and valves, the tremulous twinkle of thy wheels, Thy train of car...

...Excerpt: BOOK I. INSCRIPTIONS. One?s-self I sing, a simple separate person, Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse. Of physiology from top to toe I sing, Not physiognomy alone nor brain alone is worthy for the Muse, I say the Form complete is worthier far, The Female equally with the Male I sing. Of Life immense in passion, pulse, and power, Cheerful, f...

.................................23 Thou Reader........................................23 BOOK II............................................24 Starting from Paumanok.....................24 BOOK III..........................................38...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 2 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...either Baker nor I, however, is the man, but Hardin, so far as I can judge from present appearances. We shall have no split or trouble about the matte... ...ey and property. They live in Boonville, Missouri, and have not been heard from lately enough for 4 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Two me to s... ...ood to come of annexation, inasmuch as they were already a free republican people on our own model. On the other hand, I never could very clearly see ... ...nt of Mexico. Third. Whether that spot is or is not within a settlement of people, which settlement has existed ever since long 21 The Writings of Ab... ...d to have it done—concurring, as he did generally, with the gentleman from Arkansas [Mr. Johnson] that the postpone- ment might jeopard the safety of ... ... on this separate proposition, he re- peated that, with the gentlemen from Arkansas, he should prefer it lest they should lose all. But if there was t... ...-State laws in restraint of the internal slave trade. In 1807, in apparent hot haste, they passed the law, nearly a year in advance,—to take effect th... ...en now present the leading statesman of Vir- ginia could make genuine, red-hot abolitionist speeches in old Virginia! and, as I have said, now even in... ...l there is a way,” and what colonization needs most is a hearty will. Will springs from the two elements of moral sense and self-interest. Let us be b...

...ess matter here, you were right in supposing I would support the nominee. Neither Baker nor I, however, is the man, but Hardin, so far as I can judge from present appearances. We shall have no split or trouble about the matter; all will be harmony. In relation to the ?coming events? about which Butler wrote you, I had not heard one word before I got your letter; but I have...

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The $30,000 Bequest : And Other Stories

By: Mark Twain

.................................... ...................... 190 A HUMANE WORD FROM SATAN ................................................................... ......................................................... ...... 210 EXTRACTS FROM ADAM’S DIARY ............................................................ ...bought another acre or two and sold the most of it at a profit to pleasant people who were willing to build, and would be good neighbors and furnish a... ...llars!” All day long the music of those inspiring words sang through those people’s heads. From his marriage day forth, Aleck’s grip had been upon the... ...ave known you had a lone hand up your sleeve. Now, dear heart, I’m all red hot impatience—tell me about it!” The flattered and happy woman put her lip... ... of unrest. Poor old Hannah wetted the parched lips and softly stroked the hot brow, murmuring endearing and pitying words, and thanking the Father of... ...her form and benevo lent countenance, and then passing to the deep hidden springs of loveliness and disinterested devotion. In every clime, and in ev... ...tells me that the mountains will never again send forth the water of their springs to my thirst. Oh, that I might be freed and set at liberty from wre... ....—I see by the papers that this imfamous old fraud has just died again, in Arkansas. This makes six times that he is known to have died, and always in...

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North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

...f water-carriage and a sea-port; secondly, that it might be so far removed from the sea-board as to be safe from invasion; and, thirdly, that it might... ... into our hands, and we burned it. As regards the third point, Washington, from the lie of the land, can hardly have been said to be centrical at any ... ...er mouth! Life in Alexan- dria at this time must have been sad enough. The people were all secessionists, but the town was held by the North- 25 Trol... ...xandria seces- sion would have found but few opponents. It was here that a hot-brained young man, named Ellsworth, was killed in the early days of the... ...iefly to the excel- lence of his cause, and the blood and character of the people who put him forward as their right arm in their contest; but that he... ...ad been great in fostering the success of filibustering. Both of them were hot secessionists, and undoubtedly rebels. No two men on the continent were... ... a slave State, lying to the west of the Missis- sippi and to the north of Arkansas. It forms a portion of the territory ceded by France to the United... ..., also in the State, Tennessee. Price had been driven out of Missouri into Arkansas by General Curtis, acting under General Halleck’s orders. The chie... ...ght as well say that traveling in 326 North America V ol. 2 carts without springs, at the rate of three miles an hour, was a legacy made over to them...

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Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant

By: Ulysses S. Grant

...thing for publication. At the age of nearly sixty-two I received an injury from a fall, which confined me closely to the house while it did not appare... ...he aid of my eldest son, F . D. Grant, assisted by his brothers, to verify from the records every statement of fact given. The comments are my own, an... ...and but few east; and above all, there were no reporters prying into other people’s private affairs. Consequently it did not become generally known th... ...s in imitation of mine. The joke was a huge one in the mind of many of the people, and was much enjoyed by them; but I did not appreciate it so highly... ...dy, pine ridge, with spring branches in the valley, in front and rear. The springs furnished an abundance of cool, pure water, and the ridge was above... ...s seized and held by the teamsters while the blacksmith put upon him, with hot irons, the initials “U. S.” Ropes were then put about the neck, with a ... ... in mass. On the 19th General Taylor, with is army, was encamped at Walnut Springs, within three miles of Monterey. The town is on a small stream comi... ... him- self into the oven; a blanket would be thrown over the open end, and hot stones put into the water until the patient could stand it no longer. H... ...ad no fixed place for even nominal headquarters. He was as much at home in Arkansas as he was in Missouri and would keep out of the way of a superior ...

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