World Library  
  

Search Results (6 titles)

Searched over 7.2 Billion pages in 0.44 seconds

 
People from Hot Springs, Arkansas (X) Science (X)

       
1
Records: 1 - 6 of 6 - Pages: 
  • Cover Image

American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

... in the Republic than I had, when I landed in America. I purposely abstain from extending these observations to any length. I have nothing to defend, ... ...y, with a modest yet most magnificent sense of its limited dimensions, had from the first opined would not hold more than two enormous portmanteaus in... ...art shock before com ing below, which, but that we were the most sanguine people living, might have prepared us for the worst. The imaginative artist... ... little washing slab as standing room, — we could manage to insinuate four people into it, all at one time; and entreating each other to observe how v... ...ember of the little party having as much likeness to his natural mirth, as hot house peas at five guineas the quart, resemble in flavour the growth of... ...mfortable cordial; and nothing better occurring to me, at the moment, than hot brandy and water, I procured a tumbler full without delay. It being im... ... are something like the French coaches, but not nearly so good. In lieu of springs, they are hung on bands of the strongest leather. There is very lit... ..., and he sunk, to rise no more!’ American Notes – Dickens 251 ‘MURDER IN ARKANSAS. ‘We understand that a severe rencontre came off a few days sinc...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Portrait of a Lady

By: Henry James

...ion in The Atlantic Monthly, where it began to appear in 1880. It differed from its two predecessors, however, in finding a course also open to it, fr... ...it of a Lady merely to help him out with a lame phrase; they draw him away from his small question to their own greater ones; so that, after a little,... ...ving ‘story’ enough. I seem to myself to have as much as I need—to show my people, to exhibit their relations with each other; for that is all my meas... ...the artist’s prime sensibility, which is the soil out of which his subject springs. The quality and capacity of that soil, its ability to “grow” with ... ... attendants and enter- 15 Henry James tainers who come down by train when people in the coun- try give a party; they represented the contract for car... ... obliged to you for calling me a duck. How’s your tea?” “Well, it’s rather hot.” “That’s intended to be a merit.” “Ah, there’s a great deal of merit,”... ...my mother has thoroughly mastered the art of condensation. ‘Tired America, hot weather awful, return England with niece, first steamer decent cabin.’ ... ...acquaintance I had made upon the steamer; a lovely group from Little Rock, Arkansas. In spite of that I felt cramped—I felt something pressing upon me...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

By: Charles Dickens

...have just set down. It is this: I have never touched a character precisely from the life, but some coun- terpart of that character has incredulously a... ...o born and so bred, admired for that which made him hateful, and justified from his cradle in cunning, treachery, and avarice; I claim him as the legi... ...workhouses, and judge whether those are monsters who disgrace our streets, people our hulks and penitentiaries, and overcrowd our penal colonies, or a... ...what is ridiculous or wrong at home, so I then hoped that the good-humored people of the United States would not be generally disposed to quarrel with... ...anvil. The gleaming iron, in its emulation, sparkled too, and shed its red-hot gems around profusely . The strong smith and his men dealt such strokes... ... morning, with as much regularity as any tame single gentleman expects his hot roll, but rest content with the society of idle bachelors and roving ma... ...hostly little churchyard, all overgrown with such straggling vegetation as springs up spontaneously from damp, and graves, and rubbish. In some of the... ...was so chawed up; and the last Ala- bama gouging case; and the interesting Arkansas dooel with Bowie knives; and all the Political, Commercial, and Fa...

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

By: Mark Twain

...ss of his company — for he did all the talking. We fell together, as modest people will, in the tail of the herd that was being shown through, and he... ...s?” I said I had not heard of it. He was so little interested — just as when people speak of the weather — that he did not notice whether I made him ... ...” Then, after a pause, added: “I did it myself.” By the time I had recovered from the electric surprise of this remark, he was gone. All that evening ... ...rain beat upon the windows, and the wind roared about the eaves and corners. From time to time I dipped into old Sir Thomas Malory’s enchanting book, ... ...e him a pipe and a chair, and made him welcome. I also comforted him with a hot Scotch whisky; gave him another one; then still another — hoping alw... ... and fling furtive glances at Sir Launcelot that would have got him shot in Arkansas, to a dead certainty. Everybody praised the valor and magnanimi... ...s got down to a certain point there comes a revulsion, and he rallies. Hope springs up, and cheerfulness along with it, and then he is in good shape... ..., and dev A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court Mark Twain 58 ils hot from perdition, let alone such poor adversaries as these I was after,... ...not above medium size, but he was alert, slender limbed, muscled with watch springs, and just a greyhound to go. He was a beauty, glossy as silk, and...

Read More
  • Cover Image

North America Volume One

By: Anthony Trollope

............................................................. 115 CHAPTER IX: FROM NIAGARA TO THE MISSISSIPPI............................................... ............................................................. 303 CHAPTER XX: FROM BOSTON TO WASHINGTON .................................................... ...e those against whom a writer does not intend to give a favorable verdict; people and places whom he desires to describe, on the peril of his own judg... ...general feelings of England to have been be- fore I found myself among the people by whom it was being waged. It is very difficult for the people of a... ...ew words in politics with those around him, till drop by drop the pleasant springs of his liberty creep into his mind and water his heart; and thus, e... ...see it, and, see- ing it, should speak out her true opinion.” The North is hot with such thoughts as these; and one cannot wonder that she should be a... ... husband, and Jones entreats the good offices of my wife in moderating the hot temper of his own. But we know better than that. If we interfere, the c... ...stem lies between the States of Tennessee and Missouri, of Mississippi and Arkansas, and through the State of Louisiana. The ancient province so calle... ...e been truly foreseen with a cunning eye, then a great and prosperous city springs up, ready made as it were, from the earth. Such a town is Milwaukee...

...HAPTER VIII: NORTH AND WEST ......................................................................................................... 115 CHAPTER IX: FROM NIAGARA TO THE MISSISSIPPI .................................................................................. 130 CHAPTER X: THE UPPER MISSISSIPPI ............................................................................

Read More
  • Cover Image

Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant

By: Ulysses S. Grant

...thing for publication. At the age of nearly sixty-two I received an injury from a fall, which confined me closely to the house while it did not appare... ...he aid of my eldest son, F . D. Grant, assisted by his brothers, to verify from the records every statement of fact given. The comments are my own, an... ...and but few east; and above all, there were no reporters prying into other people’s private affairs. Consequently it did not become generally known th... ...s in imitation of mine. The joke was a huge one in the mind of many of the people, and was much enjoyed by them; but I did not appreciate it so highly... ...dy, pine ridge, with spring branches in the valley, in front and rear. The springs furnished an abundance of cool, pure water, and the ridge was above... ...s seized and held by the teamsters while the blacksmith put upon him, with hot irons, the initials “U. S.” Ropes were then put about the neck, with a ... ... in mass. On the 19th General Taylor, with is army, was encamped at Walnut Springs, within three miles of Monterey. The town is on a small stream comi... ... him- self into the oven; a blanket would be thrown over the open end, and hot stones put into the water until the patient could stand it no longer. H... ...ad no fixed place for even nominal headquarters. He was as much at home in Arkansas as he was in Missouri and would keep out of the way of a superior ...

Read More
       
1
Records: 1 - 6 of 6 - Pages: 
 
 





Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.