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The Age of Innocence

By: Edith Wharton

...- ished it for being small and inconvenient, and thus keeping out the “new people” whom New Y ork was beginning to dread and yet be drawn to; and the ... ...ost masterly intuitions to have discovered that Americans want to get away from amusement even more quickly than they want to get to it. When Newland ... ...her, leaning against the wall at the back of the club box, turned his eyes from the stage and scanned the op- posite side of the house. Directly facin... ...ared on the setting, which was ac- knowledged to be very beautiful even by people who shared his acquaintance with the Opera houses of Paris and Vienn... ...l pen-wipers made by female parishioners for fashionable clergymen, sprang from the moss beneath the rose-trees; and here and there a daisy grafted on... ...er mysteriously discredited, and neither money nor position enough to make people forget 10 The Age of Innocence it, had allied herself with the head... .... All these things went through his mind during their long slow drive from Mayfair to South Kensington, where Mrs. Carfry and her sister lived. Archer...

...the shabby red and gold boxes of the sociable old Academy. Conservatives cherished it for being small and inconvenient, and thus keeping out the ?new people? whom New York was beginning to dread and yet be drawn to; and the sentimental clung to it for its historic associations, and the musical for its excellent acoustics, always so problematic a quality in halls built for ...

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In the Cage

By: Henry James

...is Copyright © 2001 The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University is an equal opportunity university. 3 Henry James In the Cage... ...s, answer stupid questions, give difficult change and, more than anything else, count words as numberless as the sands of the sea, the words of the te... ...fluids that she came to know perfectly by their smells without consenting to know them by their names. The barrier that divided the little post-and-te... ...d in a part, the far N.W. district, where, with her mother, she would save on their two rooms alone nearly three shillings. It would be far from dazzl... ... in the grey, fitful needs to notice and to “care,” odd ca- prices of curiosity. She had a friend who had invented a new career for women—that of bein... ...were, in fantastic places, in happy homes, as usual as the coals or the daily papers. She took charge of them, at any rate, in all the rooms, at so mu... ...dealt with it good-humouredly, just because she knew so well what to think of it. It was at once one of her most cher- ished complaints and most secre... ...something else: she might have been curious, since it came to that, to see exactly what. Strolling together slowly in their summer twilight and their ... ...luckily, to all appearance, be little question of tables; and the circumstance that, on their peculiar lines, her friend’s interests would still attac...

... questions, give difficult change and, more than anything else, count words as numberless as the sands of the sea, the words of the telegrams thrust, from morning to night, through the gap left in the high lattice, across the encumbered shelf that her forearm ached with rubbing. This transparent screen fenced out or fenced in, according to the side of the narrow counter on...

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Ann Veronica a Modern Love Story

By: H. G. Wells

...ONE WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON in late September, Ann V eronica Stanley came down from London in a state of solemn excite- ment and quite resolved to have th... ...that this novel has to tell. She had a compartment to herself in the train from Lon- don to Morningside Park, and she sat with both her feet on the se... ...ore them, and she was so lost in thought that she discovered with a start, from a lettered lamp, that she was at Morningside Park, and thought she was... ...id to herself… . Morningside Park was a suburb that had not altogether, as people say, come off. It consisted, like pre-Roman Gaul, of three parts. Th... ...about her seemed to be—how can one put it? —in wrappers, like a house when people leave it in the summer. The blinds were all drawn, the sunlight kept... ...ng subsidiary devel- opments, such as flirtation and “being interested” in people of the opposite sex. She approached this field with her usual liveli... ...her it was an unfortunate recovery of a trail, or he had followed her from Mayfair. There was no mistaking his intentions this time. He came down the ...

...Excerpt: Part 1. One Wednesday afternoon in late September, Ann Veronica Stanley came down from London in a state of solemn excitement and quite resolved to have things out with her father that very evening. She had trembled on the verge of such a resolution before, but this time quite definitely she made it. A cri...

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Mens Wives

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...he duties of Boots in some inn even more frequented than his own, and, far from being ashamed of his origin, as many per- sons are in the days of thei... ...ttle bar, profusely orna- mented with pictures of the dancers of all ages, from Hillisberg, Rose, Parisot, who plied the light fantastic toe in 1805, ... ...urs, much accustomed, one for the gentlemen of the shoulder-knot, who came from the houses of their employers hard by; an- other for some “gents who u... ...gh the influence of great men; he was an agent for half-a-dozen theatrical people, male 13 Thackeray and female, and had the interests of the latter ... ... truth must be told, no greater coquette than Miss Morgiana existed in all Mayfair— no, not among the most fashionable mistresses of the fashion- able... ... person were of that showy sort which is most popular in this world, where people are wont to admire most that which gives them the least trouble to s... ...irm is, I flatter my- self, a little more up in the market than some other people’s names.” “Do you mean to insult the name of Archibald Eglantine, si...

...ck Hotel.? Mr. Crump, the landlord, had, in the outset of life, performed the duties of Boots in some inn even more frequented than his own, and, far from being ashamed of his origin, as many persons are in the days of their prosperity, had thus solemnly recorded it over the hospitable gate of his hotel....

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The New Machiavelli

By: H. G. Wells

...to Vettori, and it seems to me, now that I have released myself altogether from his literary precedent, that he still has his use for me. In spite of ... ...red, happier, finer, securer. They imagined cities grown more powerful and peoples made rich and mul- titudinous by their efforts, they thought in ter... ...s unfair. The old sort of Prince, the old little principality has vanished from the world. The commonweal is one man’s absolute es- tate and responsib... ...the interest of womanhood was in a region of life almost infinitely remote from his statecraft. They were the vehicle of children, but only Imperial R... ... Natural History, a brand-new illustrated Green’s His- tory of the English People, Irving’s Companions of Columbus, a great number of unbound parts of... ...The Science and Art Department has vanished altogether from the world, and people are forgetting it now with the utmost readiness and generosity. Part... ...and poverty, imperial splendour and luxury, Buckingham Palace, Rotten Row, Mayfair, the slums of Pimlico, garbage-littered streets of bawling costermo...

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The Voyage Out

By: Virginia Woolf

...Woolf The Voyage Out by Virginia Woolf Chapter I A s the streets that lead from the Strand to the Embankment are very narrow, it is better not to walk... ...backs. The small, agitated figures—for in comparison with this couple most people looked small— decorated with fountain pens, and burdened with des- p... ... beyond the reach of malice and unpopularity. In his guess one might guess from the moving lips that it was thought; and in hers from the eyes fixed s... ...it was sorrow. It was only by scorn- ing all she met that she kept herself from tears, and the friction of people brushing past her was evidently pain... ...orn- ing all she met that she kept herself from tears, and the friction of people brushing past her was evidently pain- ful. After watching the traffi... ...couple will stand there talking for half an hour on a fine afternoon; most people, walking for pleasure, contem- plate for three minutes; when, having... ... Rachel. On it she read, “Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dalloway, 23 Browne Street, Mayfair.” “Mr. Richard Dalloway,” continued Vinrace, “seems to be a gentlem...

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The Glimpses of the Moon

By: Edith Wharton

...o give the form of a white house-front. “Oh, come when we’d five to choose from. At least if you count the Chicago flat.” “So we had—you wonder!” He l... ...ng loveliness of the night, she was aware only of the warm current running from palm to palm, as the moonlight below them drew its line of magic from ... ...Apples of silver in a net-work of gold ….” They leaned together, one flesh from shoulder to finger-tips, their eyes held by the snared glitter of the ... ...of bills and borrowing against which its frail structure had been reared. “People with a balance can’t be as happy as all this,” Susy mused, letting t... ...l this,” Susy mused, letting the moonlight filter through her lazy lashes. People with a balance had always been Susy Branch’s bug- bear; they were st... ...d them, detested them doubly, as the natural enemies of mankind and as the people one always had to put one’s self out for. The greater part of her li... ...is sumptuous house in Fifth Avenue for another, more sump- tuous still, in Mayfair; and the young man looked curiously and attentively at his host. Mr...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...ery noisy. Look at the faces of the actors and buffoons when they come off from their business; and Tom Fool washing the paint off his cheeks before h... ...bition of this sort, will not be oppressed, I take it, by his own or other people’s hilarity. An episode of humour or kind- ness touches and amuses h... ...to the present story of 4 V anity Fair – V olume One “V anity Fair.” Some people consider Fairs immoral altogether, and eschew such, with their serva... ...Pinkerton, was an object of as deep veneration as would have been a letter from a sovereign. Only when her pupils quitted the establishment, or when t... ... work which she invariably pre- sented to her scholars, on their departure from the Mall. On the cover was inserted a copy of “Lines addressed to a yo... ...the wide world who would take the trouble off her hands. What causes young people to “come out,” but the noble ambition of matrimony? What sends them ... ...s to the commonalty. There is no more agreeable object in life than to see Mayfair folks condescending. Miss Crawley’s prodigious benevolence rather f...

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Vanity Fair

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

...ery noisy. Look at the faces of the actors and buffoons when they come off from their business; and Tom Fool washing the paint off his cheeks before h... ...bition of this sort, will not be oppressed, I take it, by his own or other people’s hilarity. An episode of humour or kind- ness touches and amuses h... ...n this to tag to the present story of 4 V anity Fair “V anity Fair.” Some people consider Fairs immoral altogether, and eschew such, with their serva... ...Pinkerton, was an object of as deep veneration as would have been a letter from a sovereign. Only when her pupils quitted the establishment, or when t... ... work which she invariably pre- sented to her scholars, on their departure from the Mall. On the cover was inserted a copy of “Lines addressed to a yo... ...the wide world who would take the trouble off her hands. What causes young people to “come out,” but the noble ambition of matrimony? What sends them ... ...s to the commonalty. There is no more agreeable object in life than to see Mayfair folks condescending. Miss Crawley’s prodigious benevolence rather f...

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The Prime Minister

By: Anthony Trollope

.... He suffered no doubt;—but with Spartan consistency he so hid his trouble from the world that no one knew that he suffered. Those with whom he lived,... ... could be marked with the finger of the observer, did he glaringly abstain from any statement which at the moment might be natural. He never hesitated... ...om- ach, his stable, and his debts, could not with any amount of care keep from us the fact that his father was an attorney’s clerk, and made his firs... .... It assists a man in getting a seat as the director of certain companies. People are still such asses that they trust a Board of Directors made up of... ...er. Indeed it had been perhaps a misfortune with Everett Wharton that some people had believed in him,—and a fur- ther misfortune that some others had... ...knew all about when he said that “The proper study of mankind is man.” But people don’t read Pope now, or if they do they don’t take the trouble to un... ...se days, lived in a very small house in a very small street bordering upon Mayfair; but the street, though very small, and having disagreeable relatio... ... poor creature, was ignorant of the little scene in the little street near Mayfair, in which Lopez had offered to carry Lizzie Eustace away with him t...

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The Young Step-Mother; Or a Chronicle of Mistakes

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...hich the vicar was not slow to un- derstand. ‘I cannot say I expected much from your conversation, and perhaps we ought not to wish it. We are likely ... ...ou ever see any one so utterly broken down? She can hardly beguile a smile from him.’ ‘His melancholy is one of his charms in her eyes.’ ‘So it may be... ...er she will be to his poor children, I do not think we ought to grudge her from our own home.’ ‘You and she have so strong a feeling for motherless ch... ...r Albinia!’ ‘T wo years, my dear.’ ‘Pray explain to me, Maurice, why, when people become widowed in any unusually lamentable way, they always are 7 T... ...rs. Annesley and Miss Ferrars, and had found a kind home in their house in Mayfair, until Maurice had been ordained to the family liv- ing of Fairmead... ... half century, and the lun- cheon-tray in the middle of all, ready for six people, for the two girls were there, and though Mr. Kendal stood up by the... ...eceive visits.’ ‘I suppose they must be!’ said Albinia. ‘You see, my dear, people would be most happy, but they do not know whether you have arrived. ... ... mile from Bayford, and they were a very lively party when they arrived in Mayfair. The good aunts were delighted to have round them all those whom th...

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Main Street

By: Sinclair Lewis

...aching comedy of expectant youth. It is Carol Milford, fleeing for an hour from Blodgett College. The days of pioneering, of lassies in sunbonnets, an... ...onsin, the Dakotas send their children thither, and Blodgett protects them from the wickedness of the universities. But it secretes friendly girls, yo... ...- ness of her body when they saw her in sheer negligee, or darting out wet from a shower-bath. She seemed then but half as large as they had supposed;... ...them by clenching his hands behind him, and he stammered: “I know. You get people. Most of these darn co-eds— Say, Carol, you could do a lot for peopl... ...dmit I fall down in sympathy sometimes. I get so dog-gone impa- tient with people that can’t stand the gaff. You’d be good for a fellow that was too s... ... retained a willingness to be different from brisk efficient book-ignoring people; an instinct to observe and wonder at their bustle even when she was... ...ame in Gopher Prairie as it did on Fifth Av- 73 Sinclair Lewis enue or in Mayfair. But the good widow came calling. She wheezed in, sighed, gave Caro...

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The Sea Wolf

By: Jack London

... The peculiar knowledge of the pilot and captain sufficed for many thousands of people who knew no more of the sea and navigation than I knew. On the o... ...ut gentleman to read my special knowledge on Poe while they carried him safely from Sausalito to San Francisco. 2 The Sea Wolf A red faced man, slamm... ...t, will you? A bell buoy, and we’re a top of it! See ’em alterin’ the course!” From out of the fog came the mournful tolling of a bell, and could see ... ...th great rapidity. The bell, which had seemed straight ahead, was now sounding from the side. Our own whistle was blowing hoarsely, and from time to t... ...e cold that was most distressing. I felt that could survive but a few minutes. People were struggling and floundering in the water about me. I could he... ... spluttered and shot past me. They were stars, I knew, and flaring comets, that peopled my flight among the suns. As reached the limit of my swing and p... ... you hunt up Matt McCarthy? He’s my old man. He lives on the Hill, back of the Mayfair bakery, runnin’ a cobbler’s shop that everybody Chapter XVI 10...

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Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

By: Charles Dickens

...have just set down. It is this: I have never touched a character precisely from the life, but some coun- terpart of that character has incredulously a... ...o born and so bred, admired for that which made him hateful, and justified from his cradle in cunning, treachery, and avarice; I claim him as the legi... ...workhouses, and judge whether those are monsters who disgrace our streets, people our hulks and penitentiaries, and overcrowd our penal colonies, or a... ... the American character—of that side which was, four-and-twenty years ago, from its nature, the most obtrusive, and the most likely to be seen by such... ...what is ridiculous or wrong at home, so I then hoped that the good-humored people of the United States would not be generally disposed to quarrel with... ...changes moral, changes physical, changes in the amount of land subdued and peopled, changes in the rise of vast new cities, changes in the growth of o... ...l,’ said Mr Tigg; ‘I have removed my town establishment from thirty-eight, Mayfair, to number fifteen-hundred-and-forty-two, Park Lane.’ ‘Come, I’m no... ...th footman being of a most confounded low and vulgar kind at thirty-eight, Mayfair, I have been compelled, in my regard for the feelings which do them...

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

..................................................................77 A LETTER FROM “JEAMES, OF BUCKLEY SQUARE.” ............................................ ...ss One, and the Poet Priest who ministers at thy Shrine draws his auguries from the bleeding hearts of men! While Love hath no end, Can the Bard ever ... ...n these, our times, the Artisan hath his voice as well as the Monarch. The people To-Day is King, and we 5 Burlesques chronicle his woes, as They of ... ...the gilded equipage of the Millionary; the humbler, but yet larger vehicle from the green metropolitan suburbs (the Hang- ing Gardens of our Babylon),... ..., not inglo- riously, in many wars, against mighty odds; but ’twas a small people, and on one dark night the Lion of Judah went down before Vespasian’... ...with us. As for the Rafael, I suppose you are aware that he was one of our people. But what are you gazing at? Oh! my sister—I forgot. Miriam! this is... ...aquiline nose of Major Arago, the celebrated as- tronomer. “St. George for Mayfair!” shouted his followers, strewing the plain with carcasses. Not a m... ...ter. “A Jenkins, a Jenkins!” still roared the heroic Duke: “St. George for Mayfair!” The Footmen of England still yelled their terrific battle-cry, “H...

............................74 THE DIARY OF C. JEAMES DE LA PLUCHE, ESQ., ...................................................................77 A LETTER FROM ?JEAMES, OF BUCKLEY SQUARE.? ............................................................80 THE DIARY. ........................................................................................................................

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Speeches: Literary and Social

By: Charles Dickens

...of his enthusiasm, and kindled at his example. But ev ery word which fell from his lips, and every demonstration of sympathy and approbation with whi... ...d together in inseparable connexion, and that I had never known them apart from you. Speeches: Literary and Social 7 It is a difficult thing for a ma... ...clusion of the story, I daily received letters of remonstrance, especially from the ladies. God bless them for their tender mercies! The Profes sor w... ...out a thrill of gratitude and pleasure. I shall love while I have life her people, her hills, and her houses, and even the very stones of her streets.... ...—to ap peal as a stranger to your generosity and kindness as the fre est people on the earth—I could, putting some restraint upon myself, stand amon... ...—have come with all my sympathies clustering as richly about this land and people—with all my sense of jus tice as keenly alive to their high claims ... ... it is that the air from Gin Lane will be carried by an easterly wind into Mayfair, or that the furious pestilence raging in St. Giles’s no mortal lis...

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The Greshams of Greshamsbury

By: Anthony Trollope

...nd agricultural in its pleasures. There are towns in it, of course; depots from whence are brought seeds and groceries, ribbons and fire-shovels; in w... ...oming—in accordance with the dic- tates of some neighbouring land magnate; from whence emanate the country postmen, and where is located the supply of... ...is in these days an East Barsetshire, and there is a West Barsetshire; and people conversant with Barsetshire do- ings declare that they can already d... ...ice again he made violent efforts to do so. Elections in East Barsetshire, from various causes, came quick upon each other in those days, and before h... ...se in Portman Square, she had worried him because he objected to have more people carried every winter at Greshamsbury Park than the house would hold;... ...llowed them, nor had they suffered as their sisters had suffered; and some people at Greshamsbury attributed this to the fact that a change had been m... ...norant of the interior of a court of law as any young lady living in their Mayfair vicinity. No; their business was to manage the property of great pe...

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