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The Confidence- Man

By: Herman Melville

...-bag, nor parcel. No porter followed him. He was unaccompanied by friends. From the shrugged shoul- ders, titters, whispers, wonderings of the crowd, ... ...or the capture of a mysterious impostor, supposed to have recently arrived from the East; quite an original genius in his vocation, as would appear, t... ...plain, were on the capitals, or, at least, earnestly seeking sight of them from behind intervening coats; but as for their fingers, they were envelope... ...-Man the Mississippi, and the brothers Harpe, the Thugs of the Green River country, in Kentucky—creatures, with others of the sort, one and all exterm... ... a tossed look, almost linty, as if, traveling night and day from some far country beyond the prairies, he had long been without the solace of a bed. ... ...as the question of a bystander, umbrella in hand; a middle- aged person, a country merchant apparently, whose natural good-feeling had been made at le... ...k men sent out into the coun- try; sent out to natur and grass?” “Aye, and poets send out the sick spirit to green pastures, like lame horses turned o... ...hod to the turf to renew their hoofs. A sort of yarb-doctors in their way, poets have it that for sore hearts, as for sore lungs, nature is the grand ... ... or are you owned by a company?” “My master?” “Aye, for come from Maine or Georgia, you come from a slave-state, and a slave-pen, where the best breed...

...white fur one, with a long fleecy nap. He had neither trunk, valise, carpet-bag, nor parcel. No porter followed him. He was unaccompanied by friends. From the shrugged shoulders, titters, whispers, wonderings of the crowd, it was plain that he was, in the extremest sense of the word, a stranger....

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20, 000 Leagues under the Sea

By: Jules Verne

...re nor less than with an aquatic mammal, unknown till then, which threw up from its blow-holes columns of water mixed with air and vapour. Similar fac... ...Navigation Company. But this extraordinary creature could transport itself from one place to another with surprising velocity; as, in an inter- val of... ...ed in the pa- pers caricatures of every gigantic and imaginary crea- ture, from the white whale, the terrible “Moby Dick” of sub-arctic regions, to th... ...ary and longing for repose. I aspired to nothing more than again seeing my country, my friends, my little lodging by the Jardin des Plantes, my dear a... ...of a journey, never make an objection to pack his portmanteau for whatever country it might be, or how- ever far away, whether China or Congo. Besides... ...rmed,” replied Ned Land, sharply. “They are rascals.” “Good! and from what country?” “From the land of rogues!” “My brave Ned, that country is not cle... ... nothing but love and emotion; it is the `Living Infinite,’ as one of your poets has said. In fact, Professor, Nature manifests herself in it by her t... ... that the debris of shipwrecked vessels had been seen on the coasts of New Georgia. But D’Entrecasteaux, ignoring this communication—rather uncertain,... ...aint such pictures, one must have the pen of the most illustri- ous of our poets, the author of The Toilers of the Deep. I have said that Captain Nemo...

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An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations

By: Adam Smith

...APTER IV HOW THE COMMERCE OF TOWNS CONTRIBUTED TO THE IM- PROVEMENT OF THE COUNTRY ...................................................................... ...ERCIAL OR MERCANTILE SYSTEM 342 CHAPTER II OF RESTRAINTS UPON IMPORTATION FROM FOREIGN COUNTRIES OF SUCH GOODS AS CAN BE PRODUCED AT HOME .............. ...XTRAORDINARY RESTRAINTS UPON THE IMPORTATION OF GOODS OF ALMOST ALL KINDS, FROM THOSE COUNTRIES WITH WHICH THE BALANCE IS SUPPOSED TO BE DISADVANTAGEO... ...EITHER THE SOLE OR THE PRINCIPAL SOURCE OF THE REVENUE AND WEALTH OF EVERY COUNTRY ...................................................................... ...mmediate produce of that labour, or in what is purchased with that produce from other nations. According, therefore, as this produce, or what is purch... ...er eminent teachers in those times appear to have acquired great fortunes. Georgias made a present to the temple of Delphi of his own statue in solid ... ...nd South Carolina, £8000 each. The civil establishments of Nova Scotia and Georgia are partly sup- ported by an annual grant of parliament; but Nova S... ...besides, about £7000 a-year towards the public expenses of the colony, and Georgia about £2500 a-year. All the different civil establishments in North... ...letters. It may, perhaps, be worth while to remark, that, if we except the poets, a few orators, and a few historians, the far greater part of the oth...

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The Letters of Robert Louis Stevenson to His Family and Friends ; Selected and Edited with Notes and Introd. By Sidney Colvin : Volume 1

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...hope you will find your house at Mentone nice. I have been obliged to stop from writing by the want of a pen, but now I have one, so I will con- tinue... ...se of justice forbids the receipt of less – than half-a- crown. – Greeting from, Sir, your most affectionate and needy son, R. STEVENSON. Letter: TO M... ... tribe of gipsies. The men are always drunk, simply and truthfully always. From morning to evening the great villainous-looking fellows are either sle... ...ugh vitality in them to keep their monstrous bodies fresh withal. A shrewd country attorney, in a turned white neckcloth and rusty blacks, would just ... ...absence the rest were pouring into my ears the fame and acquirements of my countryman. He was, in some undecipherable manner, connected with the Queen... ...ut not to give you news. There is a great stir of life, in a quiet, almost country fashion, all about us here. Some one is hammering a beef-steak in t... ...hey talked very nicely, and are bright, likable women both. They come from Georgia. WEDNESDAY , 10.30. – We have all been to tea to-night at the Russi... ... good and bright piece of work, and recognised a link of sympathy with the poets who ‘play in hostelries at euchre.’ – Believe me, dear sir, yours tru...

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What Is Man and Other Essays of Mark Twain

By: Mark Twain

... 6 sulphur and stone and other obstructing inborn heredities, brought down from the old geologic ages—prejudices, let us call them. Prejudices which n... ...trong ones. In each case, to get the best results, you must free the metal from its obstructing prejudicial ones by education— smelting, refining, and... ...e odds and ends of thoughts, impressions, feelings, gathered unconsciously from a thou sand books, a thousand conversations, and from streams of thou... ...at proposi tion. O.M. For instance? Y.M. Take that noble passion, love of country, patrio tism. A man who loves peace and dreads pain, leaves his pl... ...lf to saving imperiled souls. He became a missionary. He landed in a pagan country ill and helpless. A native widow took him into her humble home and ... ...uestion without any hesitancy. “General, who planned the the march through Georgia?” “The enemy!” He added that the enemy usu ally makes your plans... ...history as well as English, and that answered very well. English and alien poets, statesmen, artists, heroes, battles, plagues, cataclysms, revolution... ...es, slaughter one another’s subjects; it has raised up prize fighters, and poets, and villages mayors, and little and big politicians, and big and lit... ...nfin ished literary work, not a scrap of manuscript of any kind . Many poets have died poor, but this is the only one in history that has died th...

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In the Fourth Year Anticipations of a World Peace

By: H. G. Wells

...ve no possible interest; they will have come at these questions themselves from different angles and they will have long since got to their own conclu... ... of Mr. Fayle’s “Great Settle- ment” (1915), a frankly sceptical treatment from the British Imperialist point of view, on the other. An illuminating d... ...r Walter Phillimore’s “Three Centuries of Treaties.” Two ex- cellent books from America, that chance to be on my table, are Mr. Goldsmith’s “League to... ...rite some language or other; Bogota with a population of a million, mostly poets; Hayti with a population of a mil- lion and a third, almost entirely ... ...e- thing more effective, Italy, France, the United States, Japan, and this country will send separate groups of representatives, with separate instruc... ...of the time is the evident desire of the Labour movement in every European country to take part in a collateral conference of Labour that shall meet w... ...n eventualities with- out a loss of your sovereign freedom. People in this country and in France do not seem to be sitting up manfully to these necess... ..., or the Jews in Roumania, or the Poles in West Prussia, or the negroes in Georgia, or the Indi- ans in the T ransvaal make such an appeal? Could any ...

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