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Poets from Georgia (Country) (X) Political Science (X)

       
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A Treatise on Government Translated from the Greek of Aristotle

By: William Ellis A. M.

...A TREATISE ON GOVERNMENT TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK OF ARISTOTLE BY WILLIAM ELLIS, A.M. A PENN STATE ELECTRONIC ... ...l opportunity university. 3 Aristotle A TREATISE ON GOVERNMENT TRANSLATED FROM THE GREEK OF ARISTOTLE BY WILLIAM ELLIS, A.M. LONDON &.TORONTO PUBLISH... ...litics mainly a description of a Utopia or ideal state which might inspire poets or philosophers but have little direct effect upon political institut... ...blic is obviously impracticable, for its author had turned away in despair from existing politics. He has no proposals, in that dialogue at least, for... ...can be nothing but between slaves of different sexes. For which reason the poets say, it is proper for the Greeks to govern the barbarians, as if a ba... ...; thus also it is with those of noble descent: it is not only in their own country that they are Esteemed as such, but everywhere, but the barbarians ... ...of this sort. They do much better who enumerate the different vir- tues as Georgias did, than those who thus define them; and as Sophocles speaks of a... ...ant there thirty years, Periander forty-four, and Psammetichus, the son of Georgias, three years; the reason for which was, that Cypselus was a popula... ...asion for the virtues of temperance and justice. Thus if there are, as the poets tell us, any inhabitants in the happy isles, to these a higher degree...

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Democracy in America

By: Alexis de Tocqueville

... that separated the Declaration of the In- dependence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our written Constituti... ...serve should be valued by the human family. Those liberties had been wrung from reluctant monarchs in many contests, in many countries, and were group... ...eople and in vin- dication of truths that will stand for their deliverance from monarchical rule, while time shall last. A French aristocrat of the pu... ..., they thought themselves transported into those fabulous regions of which poets had sung. The sea sparkled with phosphoric light, and the extraordina... ..., they thought themselves transported into those fabulous regions of which poets had sung. The sea sparkled with phosphoric light, and the extraordina... ...i. Section 8. **See the constitutions of Illinois, Maine, Connecticut, and Georgia. 129 Tocqueville him of his power, is to commit what all the world... ...r. The question was most elaborately considered in the case of Chisholm v. Georgia, and was decided by the majority of the Supreme Court in the affirm... ...s the laws – What these causes are amongst the Anglo-Americans – Maine and Georgia, separated by a distance of a thousand miles, more naturally united... ...ss progress than in the United States; and in few have great artists, fine poets, or celebrated writers been more rare. Many Europe- ans, struck by th...

...Excerpt: In the eleven years that separated the Declaration of the Independence of the United States from the completion of that act in the ordination of our written Constitution, the great minds of America were bent upon the study of the principles of government that were essential to the preservation of the liberties which...

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American Notes

By: Rudyard Kipling

... Rudyard Kipling, the literary hero of the present hour, ‘the man who came from nowhere,’ as he says himself, and who a year ago was consciously nothi... ... this Mr. Kipling, then but twenty- four years old, had arrived in England from India to find that fame had preceded him. He had already gained fame i... ...ed and critical people, after reading “Departmental Ditties,” “Plain Tales from the Hills,” and various other stories and verses, had stamped him for ... ...refused admittance to all but tried friends. He made a study of the Yankee country dialect and character for “The Walking Delegate,” and while “Captai... ...in it. All the travel books will tell you about hotel arrangements in this country. They should be seen to be appreciated. Understand clearly—and this... ...oarding. Some day, perhaps, whatever sort of government may obtain in this country will make a restoration of the place and keep it clean and neat. At... ...hought beyond the enjoyment of a good time. As certain, also, of their own poets have said:— “Man is fire and woman is tow, And the devil he comes and... ...k to a white girl, the daughter of a colonel, one of the first families of Georgia’s modern chivalry, and all the weary, weary rest of it. The Souther...

...small rooms connected by a tiny hall afford sufficient space to contain Mr. Rudyard Kipling, the literary hero of the present hour, ?the man who came from nowhere,? as he says himself, and who a year ago was consciously nothing in the literary world.?...

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North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

...f water-carriage and a sea-port; secondly, that it might be so far removed from the sea-board as to be safe from invasion; and, thirdly, that it might... ... into our hands, and we burned it. As regards the third point, Washington, from the lie of the land, can hardly have been said to be centrical at any ... ...ng to the irregularities of the coast it is not easy of access by railways from different sides. Baltimore would have been far better. But as far as w... .... I fear, therefore, that we must acknowledge that the site chosen for his country’s capital by George Wash- 5 Trollope ington has not been fortunate... ...- cient to bind his successors to his wishes. The political leaders of the country have done what they could for Washington. The pride of the nation h... ...o man had yet heard. Of the slave States, Virginia, the two Carolinas, and Georgia were alone wedded to slavery. Then the matter might have been man- ... ...cratic in its nature—aristocratic and patriarchal. A large slaveowner from Georgia may call himself a democrat, may think that he reveres republican i... ...ed all that was demanded. Had secession been granted to South Carolina and Georgia, Virginia would have been coerced to join those States by the natur... ...n historians are acknowledged as great au- thors, and as regards their own poets, will sometimes de- mand your admiration for strains with which you h...

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The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin with Introduction and Notes Edited

By: Charles W. Eliot

...turned to his former trade, and shortly set up a print ing house of his own from which he published “The Pennsyl vania Gazette,” to which he contrib... ...gent for the colony, this time to petition the King to resume the government from the hands of the proprietors. In London he actively opposed the pro ... ...e of French society; and with such success did he conduct the affairs of his country that when he finally returned he received a place only second to ... ... AUTOBIOGRAPHY 1706 1757 TWYFORD, at the Bishop of St. Asaph’s, 1771. The country seat of Bishop Shipley, the good bishop, as Dr. Franklin used to ... ...them for you. To which I have besides some other inducements. Having emerged from the poverty and obscurity in which I was born and bred, to a state o... ...t become eminent in it, and make his for tune by it, alleging that the best poets must, when they first began to write, make as many faults as he did... ... Whitefield, in leaving us, went preaching all the way thro’ the colonies to Georgia. The settlement of that prov ince had lately been begun, but, in... ... which I myself was an instance. I did not disapprove of the design, but, as Georgia was then destitute of materials and workmen, and it was pro pose... ...also one of our club, who, being of my sentiments respecting the building in Georgia, and suspecting a collec tion might be intended, had, by precaut...

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