Search Results (103 titles)

Searched over 7.2 Billion pages in 0.42 seconds

 
Social Democratic Parties (X) PDF (eBook) (X) Literature (X)

       
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 1 - 20 of 103 - Pages: 
  • Cover Image

And Gulliver Returns Book V : My Visit to Singaling

By: Lemuel Gulliver XVI

......................................................................... 69 SOCIAL CLASS ................................................................. ...ent and loved children on the globe. They have done this through a strong social value system that praises intelligence and rewards education. This ... ...r worst leader, was also a minority president. Guess it just shows that a democratic system is a hit or miss system for choosing a leader. I wonder i... ...ndant problems are a major drag on modern societies and their economic and social systems.” 10 —“No question about that. We discussed som... ...l system men generally get the voting rights long before women do. In the democratic U.S. only 10% of the senators are women. Contrast that with the ... ...improve the status of women in the Middle East. Women are driving forward democratic freedoms as they fight for their individual rights in societies ... ...als. And if they must wear monkey suits to their jobs they dress down for parties. I‟ve noticed in Norway they tend to do the opposite. They often w... ... But they don the coat and tie for evening get-togethers, even for casual parties. “I have a mental picture of a friend of mine who lived at ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Speeches: Literary and Social

By: Charles Dickens

...nn State Electronic Classics Series Publication ii Speeches: Literary and Social by Charles Dickens is a publication of the Pennsylvania State Uni... ...the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. Speeches: Literary and Social by Charles Dickens , the Pennsylvania State University, Electronic... ............................. 195 v Charles Dickens 6 Speeches: Literary and Social by Charles Dickens SPEECH: EDINBURGH, JUNE 25, 1841. At a public din... ...or fictitious characters the classes from which they are drawn—about third parties, in whom we had a common interest. At every new act of kindness on ... ...eed—which is a very wide and comprehensive one, and includes all sects and parties— is very easily summed up. I have faith, and I wish to diffuse fait... ...o my way rejoicing, and for the future to shake hands with America, not at parties but at home; and, therefore, gentlemen, I say to night, with a full... ...y for merit everywhere: accepting it equally whether it be aristocratic or democratic, only asking whether it be honest or true, is, I take it, the tr...

Excerpt: Speeches: Literary and Social by Charles Dickens.

Read More
  • Cover Image

Democracy in America

By: Alexis de Tocqueville

...hich was ex- perimental in our plan of government was the question whether democratic rule could be so organized and conducted that it would not degen... ... of 6 Democracy in America the people, of all races and conditions, their social and reli- gious sentiments, their education and tastes; their indust... ...cibly than the general equality of conditions.” He referred, doubtless, to social and political conditions among the people of the white race, who are... ...now search for a law that would negative this provision in its effect upon social equality, he would fail to find it. But he would find it in the unwr... ...He beheld, and deplored, the excesses that had attended the genesis of the democratic spirit in France, and while he loved liberty, he detested the cr... ... is apparent that the tendency of his mind was not wholly favorable to the democratic principle, yet those who dissent from his conclusions must comme... ... party; I have undertaken not to see differently, but to look further than parties, and whilst they are busied for the morrow I have turned my thought... ... been agitated for centuries by the struggles of faction, and in which all parties had been obliged in their turn to place themselves under the protec... ...y drawing up a social contract, which was acceded to by all the interested parties. See “Pitkin’s History,” pp. 42 and 47. 53 Tocqueville Charles I d...

Read More
  • Cover Image

French Ways and Their Meaning

By: Edith Wharton

... the peoples who drink spirits and those who drink wine, between those whose social polity dates from the Forum, and those who still feel and legislat... ...use that people is defending the principle of liberty in which all the great democratic nations believe, he likes to think that the country he is fight... ...essing up their statues of Bismarck as “Liberty Enlightening the World” when democratic visitors were expected. An amusing instance of this kind of ca... ..., a people destined by fate to break up new continents and experiment in new social conditions; and therefore it may be useful to see what part is pla... ...o forget them. But there it is. The French believe themselves to be the most democratic peo ple in the world—and they have some of the democratic ins... ...ontained, and until this war did away with distances we were free to try any social and political experiments we pleased, without, at any rate, weaken... ... be determined solely by reciprocal inclination, and to bind the contracting parties not only to a social but to a physical lifelong loyalty, love, wh...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 4 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...at I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equal- ity of the white and black races; that I am not... ...ch I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And in as much as they cannot so live, while... ..., a man, woman, or child who was in favor of producing a perfect equality, social and political, between negroes and white men. I recollect of but one... ...as both the great political 20 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Four parties declared in their National Conventions. That “forever” turned out t... ... myself having made a bargain to sell out the entire Whig and Demo- cratic parties in 1854: Judge Douglas brings forward no evi- dence to sustain his ... ...ole earth ever said so, until the necessities of the present policy of the Democratic party, in regard to slavery, had to invent that affirmation. And... ...o that division. Don’t you remember how two years ago the opponents of the Democratic party were di- vided between Fremont and Fillmore? I guess you d... ...n, one of the terms of which was that Trumbull was to Abolitionize the old Democratic party, and I (Lincoln) was to Abolitionize the old Whig party; I... ...ll be, of sufficient strength to disturb the general peace of the country. Parties themselves may be divided and quarrel on minor questions, yet it ex...

Read More
  • Cover Image

What Is Coming a Forecast of Things after the War

By: H. G. Wells

...ntly occupied by the affairs of the White House, by the clash of political parties, by interferences with American overseas trade and the security of ... ...Minor, where no definite national boundaries, no religious, linguistic, or social homogeneities have ever established them- selves since the Roman leg... ...ay mean simply an ebb of vigour on both sides, unusual hardship, a general social and economic disorganisation and grading down. The fact that a great... ... oughness of mobilisation. There need be no doubt that she will completely socialise herself, completely reorganise her whole social and economic stru... ...tically to rule Great Britain, and who are powerful and influential in all democratic countries. In order to secure a certain independence and integri... ...ought and sold, in gross and detail, by financiers, advertisers, political parties, and the like. Ger- many came into the market rather noisily, and g... ...“go as you please,” or fail. And we find the affairs of nearly every great democratic State in the hands of a class of men not specially adapted to an... ...in relation to her general national life than 68 What Is Coming? the free democratic countries. She has to make a bureau- cracy that has not hitherto... ...fessor Michels has recently pointed out in his striking book on “Political Parties,” is the necessary reality of democratic government. By different m...

Read More
  • Cover Image

In the Fourth Year Anticipations of a World Peace

By: H. G. Wells

... bigger than any other war, but it has struck deeper at the foundations of social and economic life. I doubt if we begin to realize how much of the ol... ...ting side by side with a dissentient and probably revolutionary Labour and Socialist convention—both gatherings with unsatisfac- tory credentials cont... ...nd urgent merely European necessities, a patch-up that has been made quasi-democratic in a series of after- thoughts, the American Constitution is a r... ...yed it has to be fought on purely party lines. He is the select man of the Democratic half, or of the Republican half of the nation. He is not the sel... ...andates in this matter. At present all the po- litical luncheon and dinner parties in London are busy with smirking discussions of “Who is to go?” The... ... conditions that are by the standards of the general league satisfactorily democratic. That seems to be only the com- mon sense of the matter. Every c... ...ter this essential fact, that the great educated world communities, with a social and industrial organization on a war-capable scale, are going to dom... ...hat is so or not, whether Germany is or is not to be one of the interested parties in the African solution, the fact remains that it is impossible to ... ...e of manipulation, that leads straight, not to the representation of small parties, but to a type of democratic government by selected best men. Befor...

Read More
  • Cover Image

First and Last Things : A Confession of Faith and a Rule of Life

By: H. G. Wells

...lving numerous but a fi- nite number of units, has also to be abandoned in social sci- ence. We cannot put Humanity into a museum or dry it for examin... ... We have to realize that these things are as foolish and ill-bred and anti-social as shout- ing in conversation or making puns; and we have to work ou... ...curiosity come those desires and motives that one shares perhaps with some social beasts, but far more so as a conscious thing with men alone. These d... ...r conversion we did this darkly and with our hate spreading to persons and parties from the things for which they stood. But the believer will hate lo... ...radiction that in Great Britain and Western Europe gener- ally, just those parties that stand most distinctly for personal devotion to the State in ec... ...l devotion to the State in economic matters, the Socialist and Socialistic parties, are most opposed to the idea of military 99 H. G . Wells service,... ...mon Man has worked and is working infinite mischief. In politics the crude democratic faith leads directly to the submission of every question, howeve... ... These two ideas, firstly the pupil-teacher parental idea and secondly the democratic idea (that is to say the idea of an equal ultimate significance)...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 3 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...o are trying 13 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Three to divide the Democratic party for the purpose of electing a Republican Senator in my pla... ...ng—I take it upon myself to defy any man to show a printed resolution of a Democratic meeting, large or small— in favor of Judge Trumbull, or any of t... ...fair to us as the old one, and in which, in some instances, two men in the Democratic regions were al- lowed to go as far toward sending a member to t... ...as says, the honor is to be divided and due credit is to be given to other parties, why is just so much given as is con- sonant with the wishes, the i... ...s about my disposition to make negroes per- fectly equal with white men in social and political relations. He did not stop to show that I have said an... ..., after running through the history of the old Democratic and the old Whig parties, that Judge Trumbull and myself made an arrangement in 1854, by whi... ... denounce people upon. What next? Free them, and make them politically and socially our equals? My own feelings will not admit of this; and if mine wo... ...s is the whole of it; and anything that argues me into his idea of perfect social and political equality with the negro is but a specious and fan- tas... ...so.] The Judge has gone over a long account of the old Whig and Democratic parties, and it connects itself with this charge against Trumbull and mysel...

Read More
  • Cover Image

A Modern Utopia

By: H. G. Wells

...at book in order to clear up the muddle in my own mind about in- numerable social and political questions, questions I could not keep out of my work, ... ...tate and solve. In Mankind in the Making, therefore, I tried to review the social organisation in a different way, to con- sider it as an educational ... ...ack to imaginative writing again. In its two predecessors the treatment of social organisation had been purely objective; here my intention has been a... ...merges upon a sort of effectual conclusion to those controversies. The two parties have so chipped and amended each other’s initial propositions that,... ...ire, or otherwise alienated them from his intimate self. A thorough-going, Democratic Socialist will 61 H G Wells no doubt be inclined at first to ob... ...ge. It must occur only under certain obvious conditions, the contract- ing parties must be in health and condition, free from spe- cific transmissible... ...least one-and-twenty; the man twenty-six or twenty-seven. One imagines the parties to a projected marriage first ob- taining licenses which will testi... ...a. I am inclined to imagine farming done by tenant associations, by little democratic unlimited liability companies working 135 H G Wells under elect... ...n odd little election is in progress. This is the selection, upon strictly democratic lines, with a suffrage that includes every permanent resident in...

Read More
  • Cover Image

Theological Essays and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ification by meanings and applications, new or old, under the galvanism of democratic forces. The disturbers of 8 Theological Essays and Other Papers... ...pedient; but if it required a new law to make it illegal, how could those, parties be held in the wrong previously to the new act of legislation? On t... ... the parish, as a party whose reasonable wishes ought, for the sake of all parties, to meet with attention? Or did he do so, in humble submission to t... ...econciled the rights of patrons for the first time with those of all other parties interested. Nobody has more than a condi- tional power. Everybody h... ..., if defeated as a clerical power, should settle into a tenure exquisitely democratic? W as that trivial? Doubtless, the Scot- tish ecclesiastical rev... ...astoral. And at this moment, so fearfully increased is the overbearance of democratic impulses in Scot- land, that perhaps in no European nation—hardl... ...vil which acts through opinion, it acts by a machinery, viz. the press and social centralization in great cities, which in these days is perfect. Righ... ...an issue not merely dangerous in a political sense, but ruinous in an anti-social sense. The artifice of the Free Church lies in pleading a spiritual ... ...middle ages. It would be absurd, however, seriously to pur- sue these anti-social chimeras through their consequences. Stern remedies would summarily ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The New Machiavelli

By: H. G. Wells

...dication of all those I burnt last night, was to no single man, but to the socially constructive passion—in any man… . There is, moreover, a second gr... ...isation arose. I have long since come to believe it necessary that all new social institutions should be born in confusion, and that at first they sho... ...of men after a day or so of disregard, talking to me of history perhaps or social organisation, or summarising some book he had read. He talked to me ... ... and the illus- trated newspapers one learnt something of the way in which parties were split, coalitions formed, how permanent offi- cials worked and... ... under- stand; Marx and Morris, the Chicago Anarchists, Justice and Social Democratic Federation (as it was then) presented so- cialism to our minds. ... ... as much as anything in life could have shocked him. Socialism as a simple democratic cry we had done with for ever. We were socialists because Indivi... .... I saw myself striding on down that winding road, talking of politics and parties and bills of parliament and all sorts of dessicated things. That ro... ...all ages, and a scattering of aunts, and there was a tendency to clotting, parties kept together and regarded parties suspi- ciously. Mr. Seddon was i... ...ollection of people worked for me; two solicitors, a cheap photographer, a democratic parson, a number of dis- senting ministers, the Mayor of Kingham...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 1 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... American statesman since Washington, the statesman who in this absolutely democratic republic succeeded best, was the very man who actually combined ... ...Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol One won him the election in the strongly Democratic district. Then for the first time, perhaps, he thought seriously... ...ator of the United States when only thirty-nine years old. In the National Democratic convention of 1852 he appeared even as an aspirant to the nomina... ...f the State at least, as the representative combatants of their respective parties in the debates be- fore popular meetings. As soon, therefore, as, a... ...with their consent. He repeatedly dis- avowed any wish on his part to have social and political equality established between whites and blacks. On thi... ...tive by temperament and mental habit, and led the most sudden and sweeping social revolution of our time; who, preserving his homely speech and rustic... ...ci- pal members of the convention not only condemned sla- very as a moral, social, and political evil, but believed that by the suppression of the sla... ...he gov- ernment, through it all; that he listened to all advice, heard all parties, and then, always realizing his responsibility to God and the natio... ...art, and the whole depend upon the honor and integrity of the con- tending parties, to which party would the greatest degree of credit be due? Again: ...

Read More
  • Cover Image

North America Volume Two

By: Anthony Trollope

...ood sense to be guided in civil matters by men who had studied the laws of social life and the theories of free government. He was justus et tenax pro... ...eir Northern brethren. They and their fami- lies had been more addicted to social pleasures. They are the descendants of the old English Cavaliers, wh... ... indeed there was such a shout of triumph that no ministry in a country so democratic could have ventured to go at once against it, and to do so witho... ... to their work with the exercise of all their energies. They organized the Democratic party so 58 North America V ol. 2 as to include the leaders amo... ...obably be given mainly to Madison and Hamilton, Madison finding the French democratic element, and Hamilton the English conserva- tive element—this qu... ...glish money. Russia and England are not more unlike in their political and social feelings than are the real slave States and the real free-soil State... ...reed, no such radical difference as to the essential rules of life between parties in our country. We have no such cause for personal rancor in our Pa... ... existed for some years past in both Houses of Congress. These two extreme parties were the slaveowners of the South and the aboli- tionists of the No... ...ed, and with their numbers their power and their violence. In this way two parties have been formed who could not look on each other without hatred. A...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 5 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...ion of Judge Douglas, and such were the opinions of the leading men of the Democratic Party. Even as late as the spring of 1856 Mr. Buchanan said, a s... ...e a concise statement of the dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign.... ... dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign. This question has been put ... ...ked out for this discussion. The difference between the Republican and the Democratic parties on the leading issues of this contest, as I understand i... ... this discussion. The difference between the Republican and the Democratic parties on the leading issues of this contest, as I understand it, is that ... ... contest, as I understand it, is that the former consider slavery a moral, social and political wrong, while the latter do not consider it either a mo... ...and political wrong, while the latter do not consider it either a moral, a social or a political wrong; and the action of each, as respects the growth... ...s. I will not affirm that the Demo- cratic party consider slavery morally, socially and politically right, though their tendency to that view has, in ... ... the difference, as I understand it, between the Republican and Democratic parties. My friends, I have endeavored to show you the logical con- sequenc...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Research Magnificent

By: H. G. Wells

...18 The Research Magnificent ence, and the other that fear is essentially a social instinct. He set himself upon these lines to study—what can we call ... ...an infantile characteristic. The fear felt by a tiger cub is cer- tainly a social emotion, that drives it back to the other cubs, to its mother and th... ...d can be replaced in a man’s imagination, how far some substitute for that social backing can be made to serve the same purpose in neutralizing fear. ... ...ssions that all ultimately re- solved themselves into an antagonism of the democratic and the aristocratic idea. And his part was, he found, to be the... ...e aristocratic idea. And his part was, he found, to be the exponent of the democratic idea. The next day he came down early, his talk with Benham stil... ... their inception. They were all more or less political careers. Whatever a democratic man may be, Prothero and he had decided that an aristocratic man... ...ays, he had been attentively inconspicuous in several really good week-end parties. He had spent a golden Octo- ber in North Italy with his mother, an... ...things, the only course for a sane man of honour was to stand out from the parties and try and get them back to sound issues again. There must be endl... ...“But I’m not going back to live in London in the old way, theatres, dinner-parties, chatter—” “Oh no! We aren’t going to do that sort of thing. We are...

Read More
  • Cover Image

My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass. With an Introduction. By James M'Cune Smith

By: Frederick Douglas

...ire admission of the same to the full privileges, political, religious and social, of manhood, requires power- ful effort on the part of the enthralle... ...quality to their white fellow citizens, in civil, religious, political and social rank, but they have also illustrated and adorned our common country ... ...tish and Irish audiences in public, and the refinement and elegance of the social circles in which he mingled, not only as an equal, but as a recogniz... ...e United States, even while organs of, and when supported by, anti-slavery parties, have, with a single exception, failed to pay expenses. Mr. Douglas... ...norable con- tinuance of the race. Marriage as imposing obligations on the parties to it—has no existence here, except in such hearts as are purer and... ...oceeded from it; and, on going a little in that direction, I came upon the parties engaged in the skirmish. Mr. Siever, the overseer, had hold of Nell... ... increase their stock of knowledge, to seek pleasure, to have their rough, democratic manners softened by contact with English aristocratic re- fineme... ...d I have crossed three thousand miles of the peril- ous deep. Instead of a democratic government, I am under a monarchical government. Instead of the ... ...ing with the lord mayor of Dublin. What a pity there was not some American democratic Christian at the door of his splendid mansion, to bark out at my...

Read More
  • Cover Image

An Internationial Episode

By: Henry James

...g in the strong, crude light, and bedizened with gilded letter- ing, the multifarious awnings, banners, and streamers, the extraordinary number of omn... ... pretty young girls, dressed as if for a fete champetre, swaying to and fro in rocking chairs, fanning themselves with large straw fans, and enjoying ... ...e level tops intervened in lawnlike smoothness, it formed a charming complement to the drawing room. As such it was in course of use at the present mo... ...like that of her companion, was irritable. He, however, was also making up his mind that she was uncommonly pretty. “I daresay it’s very gay here, tha... ...t the Butterworths’. You have heard, at least, of the Butterworths. Bien. They did everything in the world for him—they turned themselves inside out. ... ...effecting a visit to the Tower of London. Suddenly it seemed as if the problem might be solved; the two ladies at Jones’s Hotel received a visit from ... .... Westgate. “All the women were decolletes, and many of the figures looked as if they could speak if they tried.” “Upon my word,” Lord Lambeth rejoine...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The Life of John Sterling

By: Thomas Carlyle

...ntroversy he had got into with certain victorious Parliamentary offi- cial parties, while his own party lay vanquished, during what was called the Orm... ...der the warmth of increasing revenue and suc- cess, miscellaneous cheerful socialities and abundant specu- lations, chiefly political (and not John’s ... ...r intentions on either side. Nor, with all the Coleridge fermentation, was democratic Radicalism by any means given up;—though how it was to live if t... ...ng the outer sur- face of things without quite penetrating into the heart, democratic Liberalism, revolt against superstition and oppression, and help... ...terlings, among others, he had made acquaintance; became famil- iar in the social circle at South Place, and was much es- teemed there. With Madam Tor... ...to take up of this relation: and in the lodgings in Regent Street, and the democratico- literary element there, Torrijos became a very prominent, and ... ...ts. I have heard, it was then worth some ten thousand pounds a year to the parties interested. Anthony Sterling, John, and another a cousin of theirs ... ... all sail towards Malaga; and, on shore, all manner of troops and detached parties were in motion, to render a retreat to Gibraltar by land impossible... ...ke a charge of Cossacks, on occasion: but it was also eminently ingenious, social, guileless. We did all very well together: and Sterling and I walked...

Read More
  • Cover Image

The World Set Free

By: H. G. Wells

... it would seem the world is growing accustomed to a steady glide to- wards social disintegration, and thinks that that too can go on continually and n... ...labour internationalism is closely bound up with conceptions of a profound social revo- lution. If world peace is to be attained through labour inter-... ...r- nationalism, it will have to be attained at the price of the completest social and economic reconstruction and by pass- ing through a phase of revo... ...nd whispered artful-looking solicitors, busily scrib- bling reporters, the parties to the case, expert witnesses, in- terested people, and a jostling ... ...very complete. In theory—and he abounded in theory—his manners were purely democratic. It was by sheer habit and inadvertency that he permitted Firmin... ...ge produce. They are bodies small enough as a rule to be run on a strictly democratic basis, and large enough to supply all the labour, except for a c...

Read More
       
1
|
2
|
3
|
4
|
5
Records: 1 - 20 of 103 - Pages: 
 
 





Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.