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Social Democratic Parties (X) English (X) Literature (X)

       
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The Mystery of Jamieson Stone

By: Jonathan Cross

...uities. He had been born in Colombia. His father was a doctor, and his mother a Bostonian socialite. At the age of seven, his parents, afraid of the ... ...was to be the best hostess in Washington. We hardly saw each other, except when we hosted parties together. We entertained everyone from Head’s of S... ...that’s crap, you were my best partner. But enough, after five years, I know this is not a social call.” “Well, in a way it is,” he said. “What’s ... ... a very active Bishop…a respected person on the political scene in Washington. You attend parties. You hear things. General Radcliff introduced you ... ...d him and asked if he agreed with providing funds to religious groups that worked for the social needs of their community. “We are all God’s childr... ...illed in the assassination attempt.” “So, why was it not on the front pages of your free democratic press,” Kang asked slamming his fist on the tab... ...nvolved in prostitution, and may be incarcerated. We need his help in identifying certain parties.” “Hold on,” he said sighed impatiently. After a m...

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Links and Factoids

By: Sam Vaknin

...ements in eastern Van (the Armenakans, in 1885) and in Russia. Radical nationalist parties were established by Russian-Armenian emigrants in 1887 (... ...sts, it is not futile to continue to look for Atlantis. http://dmoz.org/Science/Social_Sciences/Archaeology/Alternative/Lo st_Civilizations/Atlan... ...tp://wekker.seagull.net/bolivar/biograf_menu.html Bra Mary Phelps Jacob - a rich socialite - received the first patent for a bra in 1914. Her cor... ...isted. Most of the Democrats accepted this solution. This led to a schism in the Democratic party. The "fire eaters" left it and established thei... ...n Shelton Laurel, North Carolina. The Ku Klux Klan was the paramilitary arm of the Democratic party in the South, though never officially endorsed ... ...99 and 1906 Gorky lived in St. Petersburg and participated in the activities of the Social Democratic Party. When it split in 1903, he, indeed, supp... ...1906 Gorky lived in St. Petersburg and participated in the activities of the Social Democratic Party. When it split in 1903, he, indeed, supported t... ...f of the Duc de Richelieu in 1756. The Duc was in the habit of holding nude dinner parties. Having beaten the British at Port Mahon, he instructed ... ...resentation gave voice and presence in the Reichstag to even the smallest political parties. One tenth of the population could force a referendum on...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 4 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...at I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equal- ity of the white and black races; that I am not... ...ch I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And in as much as they cannot so live, while... ..., a man, woman, or child who was in favor of producing a perfect equality, social and political, between negroes and white men. I recollect of but one... ...as both the great political 20 The Writings of Abraham Lincoln: V ol Four parties declared in their National Conventions. That “forever” turned out t... ... myself having made a bargain to sell out the entire Whig and Demo- cratic parties in 1854: Judge Douglas brings forward no evi- dence to sustain his ... ...ole earth ever said so, until the necessities of the present policy of the Democratic party, in regard to slavery, had to invent that affirmation. And... ...o that division. Don’t you remember how two years ago the opponents of the Democratic party were di- vided between Fremont and Fillmore? I guess you d... ...n, one of the terms of which was that Trumbull was to Abolitionize the old Democratic party, and I (Lincoln) was to Abolitionize the old Whig party; I... ...ll be, of sufficient strength to disturb the general peace of the country. Parties themselves may be divided and quarrel on minor questions, yet it ex...

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The New Machiavelli

By: H. G. Wells

...dication of all those I burnt last night, was to no single man, but to the socially constructive passion—in any man… . There is, moreover, a second gr... ...isation arose. I have long since come to believe it necessary that all new social institutions should be born in confusion, and that at first they sho... ...of men after a day or so of disregard, talking to me of history perhaps or social organisation, or summarising some book he had read. He talked to me ... ... and the illus- trated newspapers one learnt something of the way in which parties were split, coalitions formed, how permanent offi- cials worked and... ... under- stand; Marx and Morris, the Chicago Anarchists, Justice and Social Democratic Federation (as it was then) presented so- cialism to our minds. ... ... as much as anything in life could have shocked him. Socialism as a simple democratic cry we had done with for ever. We were socialists because Indivi... .... I saw myself striding on down that winding road, talking of politics and parties and bills of parliament and all sorts of dessicated things. That ro... ...all ages, and a scattering of aunts, and there was a tendency to clotting, parties kept together and regarded parties suspi- ciously. Mr. Seddon was i... ...ollection of people worked for me; two solicitors, a cheap photographer, a democratic parson, a number of dis- senting ministers, the Mayor of Kingham...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 5 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

...ion of Judge Douglas, and such were the opinions of the leading men of the Democratic Party. Even as late as the spring of 1856 Mr. Buchanan said, a s... ...e a concise statement of the dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign.... ... dif- ference, as I understand it, between the Democratic and Re- publican parties, on the leading issues of the campaign. This question has been put ... ...ked out for this discussion. The difference between the Republican and the Democratic parties on the leading issues of this contest, as I understand i... ... this discussion. The difference between the Republican and the Democratic parties on the leading issues of this contest, as I understand it, is that ... ... contest, as I understand it, is that the former consider slavery a moral, social and political wrong, while the latter do not consider it either a mo... ...and political wrong, while the latter do not consider it either a moral, a social or a political wrong; and the action of each, as respects the growth... ...s. I will not affirm that the Demo- cratic party consider slavery morally, socially and politically right, though their tendency to that view has, in ... ... the difference, as I understand it, between the Republican and Democratic parties. My friends, I have endeavored to show you the logical con- sequenc...

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The Research Magnificent

By: H. G. Wells

...18 The Research Magnificent ence, and the other that fear is essentially a social instinct. He set himself upon these lines to study—what can we call ... ...an infantile characteristic. The fear felt by a tiger cub is cer- tainly a social emotion, that drives it back to the other cubs, to its mother and th... ...d can be replaced in a man’s imagination, how far some substitute for that social backing can be made to serve the same purpose in neutralizing fear. ... ...ssions that all ultimately re- solved themselves into an antagonism of the democratic and the aristocratic idea. And his part was, he found, to be the... ...e aristocratic idea. And his part was, he found, to be the exponent of the democratic idea. The next day he came down early, his talk with Benham stil... ... their inception. They were all more or less political careers. Whatever a democratic man may be, Prothero and he had decided that an aristocratic man... ...ays, he had been attentively inconspicuous in several really good week-end parties. He had spent a golden Octo- ber in North Italy with his mother, an... ...things, the only course for a sane man of honour was to stand out from the parties and try and get them back to sound issues again. There must be endl... ...“But I’m not going back to live in London in the old way, theatres, dinner-parties, chatter—” “Oh no! We aren’t going to do that sort of thing. We are...

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The World Set Free

By: H. G. Wells

... it would seem the world is growing accustomed to a steady glide to- wards social disintegration, and thinks that that too can go on continually and n... ...labour internationalism is closely bound up with conceptions of a profound social revo- lution. If world peace is to be attained through labour inter-... ...r- nationalism, it will have to be attained at the price of the completest social and economic reconstruction and by pass- ing through a phase of revo... ...nd whispered artful-looking solicitors, busily scrib- bling reporters, the parties to the case, expert witnesses, in- terested people, and a jostling ... ...very complete. In theory—and he abounded in theory—his manners were purely democratic. It was by sheer habit and inadvertency that he permitted Firmin... ...ge produce. They are bodies small enough as a rule to be run on a strictly democratic basis, and large enough to supply all the labour, except for a c...

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The Pupil

By: Henry James

...ood places” as if they had been pick- pockets or strolling players. They had at Nice a villa, a carriage, a piano and a banjo, and they went to offici... ...th multitude of the enormous city and pretended they were proud of their position in it—it showed them “such a lot of life” and made them conscious of... ...hat had their forefathers—all decent folk, so far as he knew—done to them, or what had he done to them? Who had poisoned their blood with the fifth-ra... ...tons hadn’t re-appeared, the princes had scat- tered; wasn’t that the beginning of the end? Mrs. Moreen had lost her reckoning of the famous “days”; h... ...n. Flowers were all very well, but - Pemberton could complete the proposition. It was now positively conspicuous that in the long run the Moreens were...

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Babbitt

By: Sinclair Lewis

...horescent dial. Babbitt was proud of being awakened by such a rich device. Socially it was almost as creditable as buying expensive cord tires. He sul... ... she was alive. After a rather thorough discussion of all the domestic and social aspects of towels she apologized to Babbitt for his having an alcoho... ...d her dad are millionaires! I suppose you’re trying to rub in your exalted social position! Well, let me tell you that your revered paternal ancestor,... .... Vecchia was not a caterer, he was The Caterer of Zenith. Most coming-out parties were held in the white and gold ballroom of the Maison Vecchia; at ... ...d given him the beginning of a repu- tation for oratory, so the Republican-Democratic Central Committee sent him to the Seventh Ward and South Ze- nit... ... and it was always thinning into silence. Despite their reso- lution to be democratic they divided into two sets: the men with dress-clothes and the m... ... to Max Kruger, the banker, “Yes, we’ll put up Sir Gerald Doak.” Babbitt’s democratic love 169 Sinclair Lewis for titles became a rich relish. “You k... ...e of those quiet evenings that are often so much more enjoyable than noisy parties where everybody talks at once and doesn’t really settle down to-nic... ...tt had heard stories of what the Athletic Club called “goings on” at young parties; of girls “parking” their corsets in the dressing-room, of “cud- dl...

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The Deputy of Arcis

By: Honoré de Balzac

...h of his political ideas, the colonel had lived almost entirely outside of social life. Rising with the sun, he devoted himself to horticulture; he ad... ...tion. That affair divides to this day the arrondissement of Arcis into two parties; one of which declares the inno- cence of the condemned; the other ... ...er to influence the masses, should say and resay this truth,—to hoard is a social crime. The deliberate hoarding of a province arrests industrial life... ...ll appeared to belong to a man who had dropped upon Arcis from the highest social sphere. The stranger, no doubt fatigued, did not show himself for a ... ...would the old notary not have made? With the legitimist and the republican parties who could have no weight in the election, except that of increasing... ... 123 Balzac in Paris in 1829-1830. They lived in great state and gave fine parties. I myself met them in Italy.” “But their name?” I said. “De Lanty,”... ...us conservatives, whereas Monsieur Dorlange inclines in a marked degree to democratic principles. This unexpected superiority in my problematical foll... ...e child told the truth. She only said, with her blunt simplicity, what our democratic customs still allow us to put in practice, though they forbid us... ...e lead in our discus- sions. In this little club the prevailing opinion is democratic; it is represented under all its aspects, the phalansterian Uto-...

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Sartor Resartus: The Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdrockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

... were got in, presented difficulties. Why mention our disquisitions on the Social Contract, on the Standard of Taste, on the Migrations of the Herring... ...everal; meaning thereby that, one day, he would probably be hanged for his democratic sentiments. Wo steckt doch der Schalk? added they, looking round... ...nead and publish was other than medicinal and sacred. In such environment, social, domestic, physical, did Teufelsdrockh, at the time of our acquainta... ...ed Armies, and cashiering most Kings and Senates, and creating a whole new Democratic world: he had invented the Art of Print- ing. The first ground h... ...d shrine for the Holy in man. Clothes gave us individuality, distinctions, social polity; Clothes have made Men of us; they are threatening to make Cl... ...nd these Chapters, that it may be thrown out as a pertinent ques- tion for parties concerned, Whether or not a good English Translation thereof might ... ...inistry and Opposition, and that generous conflict of 176 Sartor Resartus Parties, mind warming itself against mind in their mutual wrestle for the P... ...editary resources, and is strong by union; whereas the Drudges, split into parties, have as yet no ral- lying-point; or at best only co-operate by mea...

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Diana of the Crossways

By: George Meredith

...his ‘handsome, lively, witty’ apparition as a woman having po- litical and social views of her own, he would not, one fan- cies, have been so stingles... ...lent gen- eral manager, if no genius in statecraft. But he was careless of social opinion, unbuttoned, and a laugher. We know that he could be chivalr... ...educed her to think so positively. Her main personal experience was in the social class which is primitively venatorial still, canine under its polish... ... of us we fail in growth, there is, you are aware, an unfailing aboriginal democratic old monster that waits to pull us down; certainly the branch, po... ... coming swiftly to some solution, constituted her the chief of the pair of democratic rebels in questions that clamoured for instant solution. By dint... ... means ever a trifle beyond it, and gave 63 George Meredith choice dinner-parties to the most eminent. His jealousy slum- bered. Having ideas of a se... ... Redworth of the unexampled concert of the guests at Mrs. Warwick’s dinner parties. He had met on one occasion the Esquarts, the Pettigrews, Mr. Percy... ... carriages one after another to choose her com- pany for her. In those pre-democratic blissful days before the miry Deluge, the opinion of the require... ...itmonby too, no doubt a celebrity, was the right- hand man at these dinner-parties of Mrs. Warwick. Where will not men go to be flattered by a pretty ...

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The Writings of Abraham Lincoln in Seven Volumes Volume 7 of 7

By: Abraham Lincoln

... property, except as to slaves and in property cases where rights of third parties shall have intervened, and upon the condition that every such perso... ...ing of the Belgians, to whose arbitration the question was referred by the parties. The subject was thor- oughly and patiently examined by that justl... ...ally as I first put it. Henderson, and especially Brown, believe that the social influence of St. Louis would inevitably tell injuriously upon Gener... ...feiture and condemnation of the vessel and cargo, and the exclusion of all parties concerned from any further privilege of entering the United States ... ... be decided in November. There is no pro- gram offered by any wing of the Democratic party but that must result in the permanent destruction of the U... ...thmetic will prove to any man that the rebel armies cannot be destroyed by Democratic strategy. It would sacrifice all the white men of the North to ... ...men, most of them under arms, defending and acquiring Union territory. The Democratic strategy demands that these forces be dis- banded, and that the ... ...ce has been freely opened with Liberia, and it gives us a pleasing view of social and political progress in that republic. It may be expected to deri... ...ith hearty good-will the conventional laws which regulate com- mercial and social intercourse among the Western nations. Owing to the peculiar situati...

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The Soul of a Bishop

By: H. G. Wells

...du- ate days he had said a thing or two in the modern vein, af- fected the socialism of William Morris and learnt some Swinburne by heart, it was out ... ...s home. He had been kind, popular, and endlessly active. His undergraduate socialism had expanded simply and sincerely into a theory of administrative... ...g when King George was being crowned. Close upon that event came a wave of social discontent, the great railway strike, a curious sense of social and ... ...le and mischievous. The suffragettes became extraordinarily malignant; the democratic movement went rotten with sabotage and with a cant of being “reb... ...indolent, the French decadent, the Russians barbaric, the Americans basely democratic; the rest of the world was the “White man’s Burthen”; the clear ... ... these ridiculous or wicked little kings and emperors, and these political parties, and these policies and conspiracies, and this nationalist nonsense...

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The Lesser Bourgeoisie (The Middle Classes)

By: Honoré de Balzac

...ng for 12 The Lesser Bourgeoisie him to let herself be mistaken as to his social value. Thuillier and his sister were children of the head porter at ... ...on, for a cipher was needed. The government was afraid of displeasing both parties in the Chamber by selecting a man from either side; it therefore go... ...natures is a pharos, which illumines to their eyes the dark low corners of social existence. Superior to her brother both in mind and energy, Brigitte... ...gitte understood, far better than her brother could explain it to her, the social crisis which presently ex- 17 Balzac tinguished their common hopes.... ...ay , though it was quickly forgotten during the events of 1815. The guilty parties hav- ing escaped detection, Lemprun wished to make up the loss; but... ... but answered all things,—progress, steam, bitumen, National guard, order, democratic element, spirit of associa- 33 Balzac tion, legality, movement,... ...s of the government are in question. He admits, with his chosen paper, the democratic element, but refuses in conversation all compact with the republ... ...lican spirit to him means 1793, rioting, the Terror, and agrarian law. The democratic element is the de- velopment of the lesser bourgeoisie, the reig... ...tener, and ended by appearing ev- ery Sunday; he was invited to all dinner-parties, and became at last so familiar in the house that whenever he came ...

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Women in Love

By: D. H. Lawrence

...er. It would be queer to meet again down here in the Midlands, where their social standing was so diverse, after they had known each other on terms of... ...ality in the houses of sundry acquaintances in town. For Gudrun had been a social success, and had her friends among the slack aristoc- racy that keep... ...ts. Hermione knew herself to be well-dressed; she knew her- self to be the social equal, if not far the superior, of anyone she was likely to meet in ... ..., handsome young Englishman, Alexander tall and the handsome politi- cian, democratic and lucid, Hermione strange like a long Cassandra, and the women... ...highest of flowers, hence its charm.’ ‘No,’ she cried, ‘no—never. It isn’t democratic.’ ‘No,’ he admitted. ‘It’s the golden mob of the proletariat, su... ...ink to a conclusion, Gerald jumped to a conclusion. He abandoned the whole democratic-equal- ity problem as a problem of silliness. What mattered was ... .... She thought of the wives and daughters of the pit-managers, their tennis-parties, and their terrible struggles to be supe- rior each to the other, i...

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The Europeans

By: Henry James

...He possessed what is called the pictorial sense; and this first glimpse of democratic man- ners stirred the same sort of attention that he would have ... ...thing absolutely touching in that combination of paternal lib- erality and social considerateness which marked Mr. Wentworth’s deportment. It was most... ...itement in it as at first. “What ought one to do?” she continued. “To give parties, to go to the theatre, to read novels, to keep late hours?” “I don’... ...e was certainly the person who had most adequately gauged her capacity for social intercourse. Before long it became apparent to him that the Baroness... ...zie, saw on his side no reason to inter- pose. It seemed to him a graceful social law that Clifford and his sister should become engaged; he himself w...

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A Personal Record

By: Joseph Conrad

...tions in motion and upheaved the dry, hard ground on which rests our whole social fabric. There’s “virtue” for you if you like! … Of course the accent... ... quartermasters reaped a harvest of small change from personally conducted parties. But when the move was made—that move which carried us some mile an... ... calm fortitude the cruel trials of a life reflecting all the national and social misfortunes of the community, she realized the highest conceptions o... ...xpectation was worth the risk, goodness only knows. However, these Cossack parties, in most cases wandering without an officer, were known to guard th... ...en he married the widow, all his visible fortune consisted (apart from his social qualities) in a smart four-horse turnout with two servants, with who... ...mperance association or for the post of official troubadour to some lordly democratic institution such as the London County Council, for instance. The... ...an easy going “Let’s see. H’m. Suppose you tell me all you know of charter-parties.” He kept it up in that style all through, wandering off in the sha...

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Some Reminiscences

By: Joseph Conrad

...tions in motion and upheaved the dry, hard ground on which rests our whole social fabric. There’s “virtue” for you if you like!… Of course the accent ... ...ter-mas- ters reaped a harvest of small change from person- ally conducted parties. But when the move was made—that move which carried us some mile an... ... calm fortitude the cruel trials of a life reflecting all the national and social misfortunes of the community, she realised the highest conceptions o... ...ec- tation was worth the risk, goodness only knows. However, these Cossack parties, in most cases wan- dering without an officer, were known to guard ... ...en he married the widow, all his visible fortune consisted (apart from his social qualities) in a smart four-horse turn-out with two servants, with wh... ...erance association or for the post of official trouba- dour to some lordly democratic institution such as the London County Council, for instance. The... ...an easy-going “Let’s see. H’m. Suppose you tell me all you know of charter-parties.” He kept it up in that style all through, wandering off in the sha...

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The First Men in the Moon

By: H. G. Wells

... the matter. I assured him we might make wealth enough to work any sort of social revolution we fan- cied, we might own and order the whole world. I t... ... paid for polar expe- ditions. And if anything goes wrong there are relief parties. But this—it’s just firing ourselves off the world for nothing.” “C... ... passions and new weapons— now it upsets your religion, now it upsets your social ideas, now it whirls you off to desolation and misery!” “Anyhow, it’... ...brought before my mind, in its sleepless activity, in its intelligence and social organisation, in its structure, and more particularly in the fact th... ...e sort of men. But who thinks? Who governs?’ “I gave him an outline of the democratic method. “When I had done he ordered cooling sprays upon his brow...

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