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Records: 21 - 40 of 83 - Pages: 
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The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Tragedie of Anthonie and Cleopatra; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Enter Demetrius and Philo. Philo. Nay, but this dotage of our Generals Ore- flowes the measure: those his goodly eyes That o?re the Files and Musters of the Warre, Have glow?d like plated Mars: Now bend, now turne The Office and Deuotion of their view Upon a Tawny Front. His Captaines heart, Which in the scuffles of great Fights hath burst The Buckles on his brest, reneages all temper, And is become the Bellowes and the Fan To coole a Gypsies Lust. Flourish. Enter Anthony, Cleopatra, her Ladies, the Traine, with Eunuchs fanning her. Looke where they come: Take but good note, and you shall see in him (The triple Pillar of the world) transform?d Into a Strumpets Foole. Behold and see. Cleo. If it be Love indeed, tell me how much. Ant. There?s beggery in the love that can be reckon?d Cleo. Ile set a bourne how farre to be belov?d. Ant. Then must thou needes finde out new Heaven, new Earth. Enter a Messenger. Mes. Newes (my good Lord) from Rome. Ant. Grates me, the summe. Cleo. Nay heare them Anthony. Fuluia perchance is angry: Or who knowes, If the scarse-...

Table of Contents: The Tragedie of Anthonie, and Cleopatra, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1

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Areopagitica

By: John Milton

Excerpt: Areopagitica; A Speech for the Liberty of Unlicensed Printing, to the Parliament of England () -- THEY, who to states and governors of the Commonwealth direct their speech, High Court of Parliament, or, wanting such access in a private condition, write that which they foresee may advance the public good; I suppose them, as at the beginning of no mean endeavour, not little altered and moved inwardly in their minds: some with doubt of what will be the success, others with fear of what will be the censure; some with hope, others with confidence of what they have to speak. And me perhaps each of these dispositions, as the subject was whereon I entered, may have at other times variously affected; and likely might in these foremost expressions now also disclose which of them swayed most, but that the very attempt of this address thus made, and the thought of whom it hath recourse to, hath got the power within me to a passion, far more welcome than incidental to a preface....

Table of Contents: Areopagitica, 1

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Tess of the Durbervilles

By: Thomas Hardy

Excerpt: Phase the First; The Maiden -- I -- On an evening in the latter part of May a middle-aged man was walking homeward from Shaston to the village of Marlott, in the adjoining Vale of Blakemore or Blackmoor. The pair of legs that carried him were rickety, and there was a bias in his gait which inclined him somewhat to the left of a straight line. He occasionally gave a smart nod, as if in confirmation of some opinion, though he was not thinking of anything in particular. An empty egg-basket was slung upon his arm, the nap of his hat was ruffled, a patch being quite worn away at its brim where his thumb came in taking it off. Presently he was met by an elderly parson astride on a gray mare, who, as he rode, hummed a wandering tune. ?Good night t?ee,? said the man with the basket. ?Good night, Sir John,? said the parson....

Table of Contents: Phase the First ? The Maiden, 1 -- I, 1 -- II, 5 -- III, 10 -- IV, 16 -- V, 24 -- VI, 32 -- VII, 36 -- VIII, 39 -- IX, 43 -- X, 48 -- XI, 55 -- Phase the Second? Maiden No More, 61 -- XII, 61 -- XIII, 68 -- XIV, 70 -- XV, 80 -- Phase the Third? The Rally, 83 -- XVI, 83 -- XVII, 87 -- XVIII, 93 -- XIX, 99 -- XX, 105 -- XXI, 108 -- XXII, 113 -- XXIII, 116 -- XXIV, 122 -- Phase the Fourth? The Consequence, 126...

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The Holy Bible

By: Various

Excerpt: Book of Genesis; Chapter 1 -- In the beginning God created heaven, and earth. And the earth was void and empty, and darkness was upon the face of the deep; and the spirit of God moved over the waters. And God said: Be light made. And light was made. And God saw the light that it was good; and he divided the light from the darkness. And he called the light Day, and the darkness Night; and there was evening and morning one day....

Table of Contents: I Old Testament 1 -- 1 Book of Genesis, 3 -- 2 Book of Exodus, 67 -- 3 Book of Leviticus, 119 -- 4 Book of Numbers, 156 -- 5 Book of Deuteronomy, 209 -- 6 Book of Josue, 255 -- 7 Book of Judges, 286 -- 8 Book of Ruth, 318 -- 9 First Book of Samuel, 323 -- 10 Second Book of Samuel, 365 -- 11 Third Book of Kings, 400 -- 12 Fourth Book of Kings, 441 -- 13 First Book of Paralipomenon, 479 -- 14 Second Book of Paralipomenon, 516 -- 15 First Book of Esdras, 560 -- 16 Book of Nehemias, 574 -- 17 Book of Tobias, 593 -- 18 Book of Judith, 606 -- 19 Book of Esther, 623 -- 20 Book of Job, 639 -- 21 Book of Psalms, 675 -- 22 Book of Proverbs, 761 -- 23 Ecclesiastes, 791 -- 24 Book of Wisdom, 806 -- 25 Ecclesiasticus, 826 -- 26 Prophecy of Isaias, 883 -- 27 Prophecy of Jeremias, 947 -- 28 Lamentations of Jeremias, 1018 -- 29 Prophecy of Baruch, 1025...

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Far from the Madding Crowd

By: Thomas Hardy

Excerpt: Chapter 1; DESCRIPTION OF FARMEROAK -- AN INCIDENT -- When Farmer Oak smiled, the corners of his mouth spread till they were within an unimportant distance of his ears, his eyes were reduced to chinks, and diverging wrinkles appeared round them, extending upon his countenance like the rays in a rudimentary sketch of the rising sun. His Christian name was Gabriel, and on working days he was a young man of sound judgement, easy motions, proper dress, and general good character. On Sundays he was a man of misty views, rather given to postponing, and hampered by his best clothes and umbrella: upon the whole, one who felt himself to occupy morally that vast middle space of Laodicean neutrality which lay between the Communion people of the parish and the drunken section, --that is, he went to church, but yawned privately by the time the congregation reached the Nicene creed, and thought of what there would be for dinner when he meant to be listening to the sermon. Or, to state his character as it stood in the scale of public opinion, when his friends and critics were in tantrums, he was considered rather a bad man; when they were...

Table of Contents: 1 DESCRIPTION OF FARMER OAK? AN INCIDENT, 1 -- 2 NIGHT ? THE FLOCK ? AN INTERIOR ? ANOTHER INTERIOR -- ., 6 -- 3 A GIRL ON HORSEBACK? CONVERSATION, 13 -- 4 GABRIEL?S RESOLVE ? THE VISIT ? THE MISTAKE, 20 -- 5 DEPARTURE OF BATHSHEBA ? A PASTORAL TRAGEDY, 28 -- 6 THE FAIR ?THE JOURNEY? THE FIRE, 32 -- 7 RECOGNITION? A TIMID GIRL, 40 -- 8 THE MALTHOUSE ? THE CHAT ? NEWS, 44 -- 9 THE HOMESTEAD? A VISITOR ? HALF-CONFIDENCES 59 -- 10 MISTRESS AND MEN, 64 -- 11 OUTSIDE THE BARRACKS ? SNOW? A MEETING, 70 -- 12 FARMERS ? A RULE ? IN EXCEPTION, 75 -- 13 SORTES SANCTORUM ? THE VALENTINE, 79 -- 14 EFFECT OF THE LETTER ? SUNRISE, 83 -- 15 A MORNING MEETING? THE LETTER AGAIN, 87 -- 16 ALL SAINTS? AND ALL SOULS?, 96 -- 17 IN THE MARKET-PLACE, 99 -- 18 BOLDWOOD IN MEDITATION ? REGRET, 102 -- 19 THE SHEEP-WASHING ? THE OFFER, 106 -- 20 PERPLEXITY ? GRINDING THE SHEARS ?A QUARREL, 111 -- 21 TROUBLES IN THE FOLD ? A MESSAGE, 116 -- 22 THE GREAT BARN AND THE SHEEP-SHEARERS, 122 -- 23 EVENTIDE?A SECOND DECLARATION, 131 -- 24 THE SAME NIGHT? THE FIR PLANTATION, 137 -- 25 THE NEW ACQUAINTANCE DESCRIBED, 143 -- 26 SCENE ON THE VERGE OF T...

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The Merry Wiues of Windsor

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Merry Wives of Windsor; Actus Primus -- Scena Prima -- Enter Justice Shallow, Slender, Sir Hugh Evans, Master Page, Falstoffe, Bardolph, Nym, Pistoll, Anne Page, Mistresse Ford, Mistresse Page, Simple. Shallow. Sir Hugh, perswade me not: I will make a Star-Chamber matter of it, if hee were twenty Sir John Falstoffs, he shall not abuse Robert Shallow Esquire....

Table of Contents: The Merry Wiues of Windsor, 1 -- Actus primus, Scena prima., 1 -- Scena Secunda., 7 -- Scena Tertia., 7 -- Scoena Quarta., 10 -- Actus Secundus. Scoena Prima., 13 -- Scoena Secunda., 18 -- Scena Tertia., 24 -- Actus Tertius. Scoena Prima., 26 -- Scena Secunda., 29 -- Scena Tertia., 31 -- Scoena Quarta., 35 -- Scena Quinta., 38 -- Actus Quartus. Scoena Prima., 41 -- Scena Secunda., 43 -- Scena Tertia., 47 -- Scena Quarta., 48 -- Scena Quinta., 50 -- Scena Sexta., 53 -- Actus Quintus. Scoena Prima., 54 -- Scena Secunda., 55 -- Scena Tertia., 55 -- Scena Quarta., 56 -- Scena Quinta., 56...

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The Merchant of Venice

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Merchant of Venice; Actus Primus -- Enter Anthonio, Salarino, and Salanio. Anthonio. In sooth I know not why I am so sad, It wearies me: you say it wearies you; But how I caught it, found it, or came by it, What stuffe ?tis made of, whereof it is borne, I am to learne: and such a Want- wit sadnesse makes of mee, That I have much ado to know my selfe. Sal. Your minde is tossing on the Ocean, There where your Argosies with portly saile Like Signiors and rich Burgers on the flood, Or as it were the Pageants of the sea, Do over- peere the pettie Traffiquers That curtsie to them, do them reverence As they flye by them with their wouen wings. Salar. Beleeve me sir, had I such venture forth, The better part of my affections, would Be with my hopes abroad. I should be still Plucking the grasse to know where sits the winde, Peering in Maps for ports, and peers, and rodes: And every object that might make me feare Misfortune to my ventures, out of doubt Would make me sad. Sal. My winde cooling my broth, Would blow me to an Ague, when I thought What harme a winde too great might doe at sea....

Table of Contents: The Merchant of Venice, 1 -- Actus primus., 1 -- Actus Secundus., 12 -- Actus Tertius., 27 -- Actus Quartus., 42 -- Actus Quintus., 53...

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The Bostonians

By: Henry James

Excerpt: Chapter 1; Olive will come down in about ten minutes; she told me to tell you that. About ten; that is exactly like Olive. Neither five nor fifteen, and yet not ten exactly, but either nine or eleven. She didn?t tell me to say she was glad to see you, because she doesn?t know whether she is or not, and she wouldn?t for the world expose herself to telling a fib. She is very honest, is Olive Chancellor; she is full of rectitude. Nobody tells fibs in Boston; I don?t know what to make of them all. Well, I am very glad to see you, at any rate.? These words were spoken with much volubility by a fair, plump, smiling woman who entered a narrow drawing-room in which a visitor, kept waiting for a few moments, was already absorbed in a book. The gentleman had not even needed to sit down to become interested: apparently he had taken up the volume from a table as soon as he came in, and, standing there, after a single glance round the apartment, had lost himself in its pages. He threw it down at the approach of Mrs. Luna, laughed, shook hands with her, and said in answer to her last remark, ?You imply that you do tell fibs. Perhaps that...

Table of Contents: Book First 3 -- Chapter 1, 3 -- Chapter 2, 8 -- Chapter 3, 12 -- Chapter 4, 20 -- Chapter 5, 26 -- Chapter 6, 30 -- Chapter 7, 38 -- Chapter 8, 45 -- Chapter 9, 51 -- Chapter 10, 55 -- Chapter 11, 62 -- Chapter 12, 69 -- Chapter 13, 77 -- Chapter 14, 83 -- Chapter 15, 89 -- Chapter 16, 96 -- Chapter 17, 106 -- Chapter 18, 114 -- Chapter 19, 124 -- Chapter 20, 131 -- Book Second 145 -- Chapter 21, 145 -- Chapter 22, 153 -- Chapter 23, 163 -- Chapter 24, 173...

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The Prelude Or, Growth of a Poets Mind

By: William Wordsworth

Excerpt: Several years ago, when the Author retired to his native mountains with the hope of being enabled to construct a literary work that might live, it was a reasonable thing that he should take a review of his own mind, and examine how far Nature and Education had qualified him for such an employment. ?As subsidiary to this preparation, he undertook to record, in verse, the origin and progress of his own powers, as far as he was acquainted with them. ?That work, addressed to a dear friend, most distinguished for his knowledge and genius, and to whom the Author?s intellect is deeply indebted, has been long finished; and the result of the investigation which gave rise to it, was a determination to compose a philosophical Poem, containing views of Man, Nature, and Society, and to be entitled the ?Recluse?; as having for its principal subject the sensations and opinions of a poet living in retirement....

Table of Contents: ADVERTISEMENT, ii -- BOOK FIRST INTRODUCTION?CHILDHOOD AND SCHOOL-TIME 1 -- BOOK SECOND SCHOOL-TIME (continued), 19 -- BOOK THIRD RESIDENCE AT CAMBRIDGE, 33 -- BOOK FOURTH SUMMER VACATION, 51 -- BOOK FIFTH BOOKS, 64 -- BOOK SIXTH CAMBRIDGE AND THE ALPS, 81 -- BOOK SEVENTH RESIDENCE IN LONDON, 103 -- BOOK EIGHTH RETROSPECT?LOVE OF NATURE LEADING TO -- LOVE OF MAN, 125 -- BOOK NINTH RESIDENCE IN FRANCE, 144 -- BOOK TENTH RESIDENCE IN FRANCE (continued), 161 -- BOOK ELEVENTH FRANCE (concluded), 178 -- BOOK TWELFTH IMAGINATION AND TASTE, HOW IMPAIRED -- AND RESTORED, 192 -- BOOK THIRTEENTH IMAGINATION AND TASTE, HOWIMPAIRED -- AND RESTORED (concluded), 202 -- BOOK FOURTEENTH CONCLUSION, 213...

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Paradise Regained

By: John Milton

Excerpt: THE FIRST BOOK; Who e?re while the happy Garden sung, By one mans disobedience lost, now sing Recover?d Paradise to all mankind, By one mans firm obedience fully tri?d Through all temptation, and the Tempter foil?d In all his wiles, defeated and repuls?t, And Eden rais?d in the wast Wilderness. Thou Spirit who ledst this glorious Eremite Into the Desert, his Victorious Field Against the Spiritual Foe, and broughtst him thence By proof the undoubted Son of God, inspire, As thou art wont, my prompted Song else mute, And bear through highth or depth of natures bounds With prosperous wing full summ?d to tell of deeds Above Heroic, though in secret done, And unrecorded left through many an Age, Worthy t?have not remain?d so long unsung. Now had the great Proclaimer with a voice More awful then the sound of Trumpet, cri?d Repentance, and Heavens Kingdom nigh at hand To all Baptiz?d: to his great Baptism flock?d With aw the Regions round, and with them came From Nazareth the Son of Joseph deem?d To the flood Jordan, came as then obscure, Unmarkt, unknown; but him the Baptist soon Descri?d, divinely warn?d, and witness bore As to h...

Table of Contents: THE FIRST BOOK., 1 -- PARADISE REGAIN?D. The Second BOOK., 13 -- PARADISE REGAIN?D. The Third BOOK., 24 -- PARADISE REGAIN?D. The Fourth BOOK., 34 -- Notes, 49...

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Moby-Dick or the Whale

By: Herman Melville

Excerpt: Etymology (SUPPLIED BY A LATE CONSUMPTIVE USHER TO A GRAMMAR SCHOOL.); The pale Usher --threadbare in coat, heart, body, and brain; I see him now. He was ever dusting his old lexicons and grammars, with a queer handkerchief, mockingly embellished with all the gay flags of all the known nations of the world. He loved to dust his old grammars; it somehow mildly reminded him of his mortality....

Table of Contents: Etymology, 1 -- Extracts, 3 -- 1 Loomings, 15 -- 2 The Carpet-Bag, 20 -- 3 The Spouter-Inn, 24 -- 4 The Counterpane, 36 -- 5 Breakfast, 40 -- 6 The Street, 42 -- 7 The Chapel, 45 -- 8 The Pulpit, 48 -- 9 The Sermon, 51 -- 10 A Bosom Friend, 59 -- 11 Nightgown, 63 -- 12 Biographical, 65 -- 13 Wheelbarrow, 68 -- 14 Nantucket, 72 -- 15 Chowder, 74 -- 16 The Ship, 77 -- 17 The Ramadan, 89 -- 18 His Mark, 94 -- 19 The Prophet, 98 -- 20 All Astir, 101 -- 21 Going Aboard, 104 -- 22 Merry Christmas, 107 -- 23 The Lee Shore, 111 -- 24 The Advocate, 113 -- 25 Postscript, 117 -- 26 Knights and Squires, 118...

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The Second Part of Henry the Sixth

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Second Part of Henry the Sixth with the Death of the Good Duke Humfrey; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Flourish of Trumpets: Then Hoboyes. Enter King, Duke Humfrey, Salisbury, Warwicke, and Beau-ford on the one side. The Queene, Suffolke, Yorke, Somerset, and Buckingham, on the other. Suffolke. As by your high Imperiall Majesty, I had in charge at my depart for France, As Procurator to your Excellence, To marry Princes Margaret for your Grace; So in the Famous Ancient City, Toures, In presence of the Kings of France, and Sicill, The Dukes of Orleance, Calaber, Britaigne, and Alanson, Seven Earles, twelve Barons, & twenty reverend Bishops I have perform?d my Taske, and was espous?d, And humbly now upon my bended knee, In sight of England, and her Lordly Peeres, Deliver up my Title in the Queene To your most gracious hands, that are the Substance Of that great Shadow I did represent: The happiest Gift, that ever Marquesse gave, The Fairest Queene, that ever King receiv?d. King. Suffolke arise. Welcome Queene Margaret, I can expresse no kinder signe of Love Then this kinde kisse: O Lord, that lends me life, Lend me a hear...

Table of Contents: The second Part of Henry the Sixt, 1 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 1

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Songs of Innocence and of Experience

By: William Blake

Excerpt: SONGS OF INNOCENCE; INTRODUCTION -- Piping down the valleys wild, Piping songs of pleasant glee, On a cloud I saw a child, And he laughing said to me: ??Pipe a song about a Lamb!?? So I piped with merry cheer. ??Piper, pipe that song again;?? So I piped: he wept to hear. ??Drop thy pipe, thy happy pipe; Sing thy songs of happy cheer!?? So I sang the same again, While he wept with joy to hear. ??Piper, sit thee down and write In a book, that all may read.?? So he vanish?d from my sight; And I pluck?d a hollow reed, And I made a rural pen, And I stain?d the water clear, And I wrote my happy songs Every child may joy to hear....

Table of Contents: SONGS OF INNOCENCE, 1 -- INTRODUCTION, 1 -- THE SHEPHERD, 2 -- THE ECHOING GREEN, 3 -- THE LAMB, 4 -- THE LITTLE BLACK BOY, 5 -- THE BLOSSOM, 6 -- THE CHIMNEY-SWEEPER, 7 -- THE LITTLE BOY LOST, 8 -- THE LITTLE BOY FOUND, 9 -- LAUGHING SONG, 10 -- A SONG, 11 -- DIVINE IMAGE, 12 -- HOLY THURSDAY, 13 -- NIGHT, 14 -- SPRING, 16 -- NURSE?S SONG, 17 -- INFANT JOY, 18 -- A DREAM, 19 -- ON ANOTHER?S SORROW, 20 -- SONGS OF EXPERIENCE, 21 -- INTRODUCTION, 21 -- EARTH?S ANSWER, 22 -- THE CLOD AND THE PEBBLE, 23 -- HOLY THURSDAY, 24 -- THE LITTLE GIRL LOST, 25 -- THE LITTLE GIRL FOUND, 27 -- THE CHIMNEY SWEEPER, 29 -- NURSE?S SONG, 30 -- THE SICK ROSE, 31 -- THE FLY, 32 -- THE ANGEL, 33 -- THE TIGER, 34 -- MY PRETTY ROSE TREE, 35 -- AH SUNFLOWER, 36 -- THE LILY, 37 -- THE GARDEN OF LOVE, 38 -- THE LITTLE VAGABOND, 39 -- LONDON, 40 -- THE HUMAN ABSTRACT, 41 -- INFANT SORROW, 42 -- A POISON TREE, 43 -- A LITTLE BOY LOST, 44...

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Holy Sonnets

By: John Donne

Excerpt: Holy Sonnets; I THOU hast made me, And shall thy worke decay? Repaire me now, for now mine end doth haste, I runne to death, and death meets me as fast, And all my pleasures are like yesterday; I dare not move my dimme eyes any way, Despaire behind, and death before doth cast Such terrour, and my feeble flesh doth waste By sinne in it, which it t?wards hell doth weigh; Onely thou art above, and when towards thee By thy leave I can looke, I rise againe; But our old subtle foe so tempteth me, That not one houre my selfe I can sustaine; Thy Grace may wing me to prevent his art, And thou like Adamant draw mine iron heart....

Table of Contents: Holy Sonnets, 1 -- I, 1 -- II, 1 -- III, 2 -- IV, 2 -- V, 2 -- VI, 3 -- VII, 3 -- VIII, 3 -- IX, 4 -- X, 4 -- XI, 4 -- XII, 5 -- XIII, 5 -- XIV, 6 -- XV, 6 -- XVI, 6 -- XVII, 7 -- XVIII, 7 -- XIX, 7 -- THE CROSSE, 9 -- RESURRECTION, IMPERFECT, 11 -- UPON THE ANNUNTIATION AND PASSION, 12 -- GOOD FRIDAY, 1613. RIDING WESTWARD, 14 -- THE LITANIE, 15 -- UPON THE TPANSLATION OF THE PSALME, 22 -- TO MR. TILMAN AFTER HE HAD TAKEN ORDERS, 24 -- A HYMNE TO CHRIST, 26 -- THE LAMENTATIONS OF JEREMY, 27 -- HYMNE TO GOD MY GOD, IN MY SICKNESSE, 38 -- A HYMNE TO GOD THE FATHER, 39...

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In Memoriam

By: Alfred, Lord Tennyson

Excerpt: PROLOGUE; STRONG Son of God, immortal Love, Whom we, that have not seen thy face, By faith, and faith alone, embrace, Believing where we cannot prove; Thine are these orbs of light and shade; Thou madest Life in man and brute; Thou madest Death; and lo, thy foot Is on the skull which thou hast made. Thou wilt not leave us in the dust: Thou madest man, he knows not why; He thinks he was not made to die; And thou hast made him: thou art just. Thou seemest human and divine, The highest, holiest manhood, thou: Our wills are ours, we know not how; Our wills are ours, to make them thine. Our little systems have their day; They have their day and cease to be: They are but broken lights of thee, And thou, O Lord, art more than they. We have but faith: we cannot know; For knowledge is of things we see; And yet we trust it comes from thee, A beam in darkness: let it grow. Let knowledge grow from more to more, But more of reverence in us dwell; That mind and soul, according well, May make one music as before ......

Table of Contents: PROLOGUE, vi -- DEDICATION, viii -- I., 1 -- II., 2 -- III., 3 -- IV., 4 -- V., 5 -- VI., 6 -- VII., 8 -- VIII., 9 -- IX., 10 -- X., 11 -- XI., 12 -- XII., 13 -- XIII., 14 -- XIV., 15 -- XV., 16 -- XVI., 17 -- XVII., 18 -- XVIII., 19 -- XIX., 20 -- XX., 21 -- XXI., 22 -- XXII., 23 -- XXIII., 24 -- XXIV., 25 -- XXV., 26 -- XXVI., 27...

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Anna Karenina

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

Excerpt: Part I, Chapter 1; HAPPY families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way. Everything was in confusion in the Oblonskys? house. The wife had discovered that the husband was carrying on an intrigue with a French girl, who had been a governess in their family, and she had announced to her husband that she could not go on living in the same house with him. This position of affairs had now lasted three days, and not only the husband and wife themselves, but all the members of their family and household, were painfully conscious of it. Every person in the house felt that there was no sense in their living together, and that the stray people brought together by chance in any inn had more in common with one another than they, the members of the family and household of the Oblonskys. The wife did not leave her own room, the husband had not been at home for three days. The children ran wild all over the house; the English governess quarreled with the housekeeper, and wrote to a friend asking her to look out for a new situation for her; the man-cook had walked of the day before just at dinner-time; the kitchen-m...

Table of Contents: Part I 1 -- Chapter 1, 1 -- Chapter 2, 3 -- Chapter 3, 6 -- Chapter 4, 9 -- Chapter 5, 13 -- Chapter 6, 20 -- Chapter 7, 23 -- Chapter 8, 24 -- Chapter 9, 27 -- Chapter 10, 32 -- Chapter 11, 38 -- Chapter 12, 42 -- Chapter 13, 45 -- Chapter 14, 47 -- Chapter 15, 52 -- Chapter 16, 54 -- Chapter 17, 56 -- Chapter 18, 59 -- Chapter 19, 63 -- Chapter 20, 68 -- Chapter 21, 71 -- Chapter 22, 73 -- Chapter 23, 77 -- Chapter 24, 80 -- Chapter 25, 83 -- Chapter 26, 88...

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The Third Part of Henry the Sixth

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Third Part of Henry the Sixth with the Death of the Duke of Yorke; Actus Primus -- Scoena Prima -- Alarum. Enter Plantagenet, Edward, Richard, Norfolke, Mount-ague, Warwicke, and Souldiers. Warwicke. I Wonder how the King escap?d our hands? Pl. While we pursu?d the Horsmen of y North, He slyly stole away, and left his men: Whereat the great Lord of Northumberland, Whose Warlike eares could never brooke retreat, Chear?d up the drouping Army, and himselfe. Lord Clifford and Lord Stafford all abrest Charg?d our maine Battailes Front: and breaking in, Were by the Swords of common Souldiers slaine. Edw. Lord Staffords Father, Duke of Buckingham, Is either slaine or wounded dangerous. I cleft his Beauer with a down- right blow: That this is true (Father) behold his blood. Mount. And Brother, here?s the Earle of Wiltshires |(blood, Whom I encountred as the Battels joyn?d. Rich. Speake thou for me, and tell them what I did. Plan. Richard hath best deseru?d of all my sonnes: But is your Grace dead, my Lord of Somerset? Nor. Such hope have all the line of John of Gaunt. Rich. Thus do I hope to shake King Henries head. Warw. And s...

Table of Contents: The third Part of Henry the Sixt, 2 -- Actus Primus. Scoena Prima., 2

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The Taming of the Shrew

By: William Shakespeare

Excerpt: The Taming of the Shrew; Actus Primus -- Scaena Prima -- Enter Begger and Hostes, Christophero Sly. Begger. Ile pheeze you infaith. Host. A paire of stockes you rogue. Beg. Y?are a baggage, the Slies are no Rogues. Looke in the Chronicles, we came in with Richard Conqueror: therefore Paucas pallabris, let the world slide: Sessa. Host. You will not pay for the glasses you have burst? Beg. No, not a deniere: go by S[aint]. Jeronimie, goe to thy cold bed, and warme thee. Host. I know my remedie, I must go fetch the Head- borough. Beg. Third, or fourth, or fifth Borough, Ile answere him by Law. Ile not budge an inch boy: Let him come, and kindly. Falles asleepe. Winde hornes. Enter a Lord from hunting, with his traine. Lo. Huntsman I charge thee, tender wel my hounds, Brach Meriman, the poore Curre is imbost, And couple Clowder with the deepe- mouth?d brach, Saw?st thou not boy how Silver made it good At the hedge corner, in the couldest fault, I would not loose the dogge for twentie pound. Hunts. Why Belman is as good as he my Lord, He cried upon it at the meerest losse, And twice to day pick?d out the dullest sent, Trust me, ...

Table of Contents: The Taming of the Shrew, 1 -- Actus primus. Scaena Prima., 1 -- Actus Tertia., 29 -- Actus Quartus. Scena Prima., 44 -- Actus Quintus., 56...

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The Prelude of 1805 in Thirteen Books

By: William Wordsworth

Excerpt: Book First; Introduction -- Childhood and School-time -- OH, there is blessing in this gentle breeze, That blows from the green fields and from the clouds And from the sky; it beats against my cheek, And seems half conscious of the joy it gives. O welcome messenger! O welcome friend! A captive greets thee, coming from a house Of bondage, from yon city?s walls set free, A prison where he hath been long immured. Now I am free, enfranchised and at large, May fix my habitation where I will. What dwelling shall receive me, in what vale Shall be my harbour, underneath what grove Shall I take up my home, and what sweet stream Shall with its murmurs lull me to my rest? The earth is all before me--with a heart Joyous, nor scared at its own liberty, I look about, and should the guide I chuse Be nothing better than a wandering cloud I cannot miss my way. I breathe again--Trances of thought and mountings of the mind Come fast upon me. It is shaken off, As by miraculous gift ?tis shaken off, That burthen of my own unnatural self, The heavy weight of many a weary day Not mine, and such as were not made for me. Long months of peace--if su...

Table of Contents: Book First Introduction: Childhood and School-time, 1 -- Book Second Childhood and School-time (Continued), 20 -- Book Third Residence at Cambridge, 34 -- Book Fourth Summer Vacation, 53 -- Book Fifth Books, 67 -- Book Sixth Cambridge and the Alps, 85 -- Book Seventh Residence in London, 105 -- Book Eighth Retrospect: Love of Nature Leading to Love of Mankind, 126 -- Book Ninth Residence in France, 150 -- Book Tenth Residence in France and French Revolution, 176 -- Book Eleventh Imagination, How Impaired and Restored, 205 -- Book Twelfth Same Subject (Continued), 217 -- Book Thirteenth Conclusion, 228...

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The Holy Bible

By: Various

Excerpt: Genesis; Chapter 1 -- In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth. And the earth was without form, and void; and darkness was upon the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God moved upon the face of the waters. And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. And God saw the light, that it was good: and God divided the light from the darkness. And God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And the evening and the morning were the first day....

Table of Contents: I Old Testament 1 -- 1 Genesis, 3 -- 2 Exodus, 70 -- 3 Leviticus, 126 -- 4 Numbers, 167 -- 5 Deuteronomy, 225 -- 6 Joshua, 273 -- 7 Judges, 306 -- 8 Ruth, 338 -- 9 1 Samuel, 343 -- 10 2 Samuel, 385 -- 11 1 Kings, 420 -- 12 2 Kings, 461 -- 13 1 Chronicles, 500 -- 14 2 Chronicles, 539 -- 15 Ezra, 584 -- 16 Nehemiah, 598 -- 17 Esther, 617 -- 18 Job, 627 -- 19 Psalms, 662 -- 20 Proverbs, 746 -- 21 Ecclesiastes, 775 -- 22 Song of Solomon, 785 -- 23 Isaiah, 790 -- 24 Jeremiah, 854 -- 25 Lamentations, 926 -- 26 Ezekiel, 933 -- 27 Daniel, 999 -- 28 Hosea, 1019 -- 29 Joel, 1029...

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