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Cyclopedia of Philosophy

By: Sam Vaknin

...material to the one fetus created. The egg and sperm can be compared to the famous wave function (state vector) in quantum mechanics – the represen... ...tates (=millions of potential embryos and lives). The fetus is the collapse of the wave function: it represents a much more limited set of potentia... ...de and supersede one's moral obligations towards non- affiliated humans. Thus, an American's moral obligation to safeguard the lives of American f... ...igation to save the lives of innocent civilians, however numerous, if they are not Americans. The larger the number of positive self-definitions I ... ...m" still reign supreme. In extreme - though surprisingly frequent - cases, whole groups (typically minorities) are excluded from the nation's mor... ...scheme known as the stock exchange, this expectation is proportional to liquidity - new suckers - and volatility. Thus, the price of any given stock... ...Honderich, Ted, ed. - The Oxford Companion to Philosophy - Oxford University Press, New York, 1995 - p. 31) Anarchists are not opposed to organizat... ...ists (like musicians) - often describe their interpretation of an artwork (e.g., a musical piece) in terms of this type of intuition. Many mathemat... ...nt individualism play an important socio-cultural role in this semipternal game of musical chairs. Many products have a limited shelf life or an ex...

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Progress in Physics : The Journal on Advanced Studies in Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Including Related Themes from Mathematics

By: Florentin Smarandache

...n J. Crothers thenarmis@yahoo.com Department of Mathematics, University of New Mexico, 200 College Road, Gallup, NM 87301, USA Copyright c Progress ... ...n the United States of America APRIL 2005 VOLUME 1 CONTENTS D. Rabounski A New Method to Measure the Speed of Gravitation. . . . . . . . . . . . 3 F. ... ... . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 F. Smarandache There Is No Speed Barrier for a Wave Phase Nor for Entang- led Particles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... ...ng to the standard viewpoint the speed of gravitation is the speed of weak waves of the metrics. This study proposes a new approach, defning the speed... ... Invisible paradox. Neutrosophy, Neutrosophic Probability, Set, and Logic, American Research Press, Reho- both, 1998 (see the third e-print edition of... ...neutrosophic logic. Neutrosophy, Neutrosophic Probability, Set, and Logic. American Research Press, Rehoboth, 2002, 144 p. (see it in e-print: http://... ...ng since it could be seen as the “complex doubling” version of the Lorentz groupSO(1,3). Low discussed the irreducible unitary representations of such... ...s/0009052. Gonzalez-Martin G. The fne structure constant from relativistic groups. arXiv: physics/0009051. 39. Beck C. Spatio-Temporal Vacuum Fluctuat... ...r approximation, but to consider numerous processes such as colour vision, musical harmony, or Bohr’s orbit distribution in atoms, requires a high ord...

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Sextus Empiricus and Greek Scepticism

By: Mary Mills Patrick

...ern Switzerland, November 1897 BY MARY MILLS PATRICK PRESIDENT OF THE AMERICAN COLLEGE, CONSTANTINOPLE TURKEY This Thesis is accompanied b... ...opes of Aenesidemus against Aetiology. The Tropes of ἐπνρή are arranged in groups of ten, five and two, according to the period of the Sceptical Sc... ...the period of the Sceptical School to which they belong; the first of these groups is historically the most important, or the Ten Tropes of ἐπνρή, a... ...n rooms rich in gold, Another safe travelling enjoys, in a swift ship, on a wave of the sea. [1] Hyp. I. 85. [2] Hyp. I. 87-89. [3] Hyp. I. 86. T... ...e this Trope in his introduction to the ten Tropes leads one to expect here new illustrations and added [2] arguments for ἐπνρή. We find, however, ... ...nd use in the Sceptical School. These methods of proof were, of course, not new, but were well known to Aristotle, and were used by the Sceptical Ac... ...ena. For example, the Pythagoreans explain the distance of the planets by a musical proportion. II. From many equally plausible reasons which might ... ... rich in gold, Another still, safe travelling enjoys, in a swift ship, on a wave of the sea." And the poet says— "One man enjoys this, another enjo...

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The American

By: Henry James

...an by Henry James A PENN STATE ELECTRONIC CLASSICS SERIES PUBLICATION The American by Henry James is a publication of the Pennsylvania State Universi... ...he document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The American by Henry James, the Pennsylvania State University, Electronic Clas... ...ard the cock crow without a yawn. But Raphael and Titian and Rubens were a new kind of arithmetic, and they inspired our friend, for the first time in... ...ple of months ago, something very curious happened to me. I had come on to New York on some important business; it was rather a long story—a question ... ...absence several persons had come in. They were scattered about the room in groups, two or three of them having passed into a small boudoir, next to th... ... in five days. She is a charm- ing hostess; we talk of Shakespeare and the musical glasses. She is extremely clever and a very curious type; not at al... ... mo- ment he perceived Mrs. Tristram at the other side of the room, and he waved his hand in farewell to M. de Bellegarde and made his way toward her.... ... irritated sense that Madame Alboni had a thin, shrill voice, and that her musical phrase was much gar- nished with a laugh of the giggling order. Aft... ...anest winding-up of a man’s af- fairs that I can imagine!” Valentin feebly waved his hand to and fro. “Don’t in- sist—don’t insist! It is mean—decided...

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The New Machiavelli

By: H. G. Wells

...LI by H. G. Wells A PENN STATE ELECTRONIC CLASSICS SERIES PUBLICATION The New Machiavelli by H. G. Wells is a publication of the Pennsylvania State U... ...he document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. The New Machiavelli by H. G. Wells, the Pennsylvania State University, Electron... ...nce of smoking during these twilight prowls with the threepenny packets of American cigarettes then just ap- pearing in the world. My life centred upo... ...ed relish, and as his jaw was underhung, he chummed and made the moustache wave like reeds in the swell of a steamer. It gave him a conscientious look... ...ng but a few prohibitions, a few hints, a lot of dirty jokes and, and “—he waved a hand and seemed to seek and catch his image in the air—” oh, a conf... ...ng is a necessary function in a nation. The Romans broke up upon that. The Americans fade out amidst their successes. Eugenics—” “That wasn’t Eugenics... ..., and I remember disconnectedly quite a number of brightly lit figures and groups walking about, and a white gate between orchard and garden and a lar... ...hy but determined. She had rather open blue eyes, and she spoke in an even musical voice with the gen- tlest of stresses and the ghost of a lisp. And ... ...rtain amount of open-air speaking in the dinner hour outside gas-works and groups of factories. Some special sort of people was, as it were, secreted ...

Excerpt: The New Machiavelli by H. G. Wells.

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American Notes for General Circulation

By: Charles Dickens

...tion by Charles Dickens A publication of PSU s Electronic Classics Series American Notes for General Circulation by Charles Dickens is a publicati... ...in the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. American Notes for General Circulation by Charles Dickens , the Pennsylvan... ...f more than Eastern splendour, and filled (but not inconveniently so) with groups of ladies and gentlemen, in the very highest state of enjoyment and ... ... I am sorry to say.’ They are away, and never said, Good b’ye. Ah now they wave it from the little boat. ‘Good b’ye! Good b’ye!’ Three cheers from the... ...ast upon the ceiling. At the same time the door entirely disappears, and a new one is opened in the floor. Then I begin to comprehend that the state r... ...e the sky both dark and wild, and the clouds, in fearful sympathy with the waves, making another ocean in the air. Add to all this, the clattering on ... ...e little Scotch lady be fore mentioned, on her way to join her husband at New York, who had settled there three years before. Sec ondly and thirdly,... ...el discussions upon the same themes, in connection with Shakspeare and the Musical Glasses, of which we read in the Vicar of Wakefield. Near the city,... ...f the mixing of cool liquors: but they were a merrier people here, and had musical instruments playing to them o’ nights, which it was a treat to hear...

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The Age of Innocence

By: Edith Wharton

...venties, Christine Nilsson was singing in Faust at the Academy of Music in New Y ork. Though there was already talk of the erection, in remote metropo... ...f the erection, in remote metropolitan distances “above the Forties,” of a new Opera House which should compete in costliness and splendour with those... ...to; and the sentimental clung to it for its historic associations, and the musical for its excellent acous- tics, always so problematic a quality in h... ... great livery-stableman’s most masterly intuitions to have discovered that Americans want to get away from amusement even more quickly than they want ... ...!” and not “he loves me,” since an unalterable and unquestioned law of the musical world re- quired that the German text of French operas sung by Swed... ... he said, smiling into her can- did eyes, as they floated away on the soft waves of the Blue Danube. She made no answer. Her lips trembled into a smil... ...ace by a miniature portrait of the late Mr. Mingott; and around and below, wave after wave of black silk surged away over the edges of a capacious arm... ...nch fiction, and architectural incentives to immorality such as the simple American had never dreamed of. That was how women with lovers lived in the ... ... mind of man could travel, had been divided into the two great fundamental groups of the Mingotts and Mansons and all their clan, who cared about eati...

...Excerpt: On a January evening of the early seventies, Christine Nilsson was singing in Faust at the Academy of Music in New York. Though there was already talk of the erection, in remote metropolitan distances ?above the Forties,? of a new Opera House which should compete in costliness and splendour with those of the great European capitals, t...

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Sylvie and Bruno

By: Lewis Carroll

...E OTHER PROFESSOR. 62 CHAPTER 11 . PETER AND PAUL. 69 CHAPTER 12 . A MUSICAL GARDENER. 75 CHAPTER 13. A VISIT TO DOGLAND. 82 CHAPTER 14.... ...n held his hat in one hand and a little green flag in the other: whenever he waved the flag the procession advanced a little nearer, when he dipped it... ... nearer, when he dipped it they sidled a little farther off, and whenever he waved his hat they all raised a hoarse cheer. “Hoo roah!” they cried, car... ...elf, you know: he’s a very learned doctor. Why, he’s actually invented three new diseases, besides a new way of breaking your collar bone!” “Is it a n... ...” “You mean the Patients?” she interrupted, while a look of tender pity gave new sweetness to her face. “But,” with an evident wish to avoid a possibl... ...e you!” “He is a charming boy!” my Lady exclaimed. “Even his snores are more musical than those of other boys!” If that were so, the Professor seemed ... ...t, rest, perturbed Spirit!”’ “And that, I suppose, means an easy chair?” “An American rocking chair, I think—” “Fayfield Junction, my Lady, change for... ... stood tremulously lean ing on his stick, she turned to me. “This is not an American rocking chair, by any means! Yet may I say,” slightly chang ing... ...ing about the ruins: gathering at last, by common consent, into a few random groups, seated on the side of a mound, which commanded a good view of the...

...4 CHAPTER 8. A RIDE ON A LION. 49 CHAPTER 9. A JESTER AND A BEAR. 56 CHAPTER 10. THE OTHER PROFESSOR. 62 CHAPTER 11. PETER AND PAUL. 69 CHAPTER 12. A MUSICAL GARDENER. 75 CHAPTER 13. A VISIT TO DOGLAND. 82 CHAPTER 14. FAIRY-SYLVlE. 91 CHAPTER 15. BRUNO?S REVENGE....

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New Arabian Nights

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...obert Louis Stevenson A Penn State Electronic Classics Series Publication New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson is a publication of the Pennsy... ...in the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson, the Pennsylvania State Univer... ...F THE PHYSICIAN AND THE SARATOGA TRUNK MR. SILAS Q. SCUDDAMORE was a young American of a simple and harmless disposition, which was the more to his cr... ...n of title. Madame Zephyrine, probably in the hope of enchanting the young American, used to flaunt by him on the stairs with a civil inclination, a w... ...ng and capable exterior. They were divided into two 59 New Arabian Nights groups, one about a roulette board, and the other surround- ing a table at ... ...te, on a patch of smooth turf, we set down the despatch-box; and Northmour waved a white handkerchief over his head. Nothing replied. We raised our vo... ...ped into the bows himself. Northmour took the tiller; the boat rose to the waves, and the oars between the thole-pins sounded crisp and measured in th... ...us inclination of the head. Partly from the smile, partly from the strange musical mur- mur with which the Sire prefaced his observation, Denis felt a... ...d to limp about the apartment, clearing his throat the while with that odd musical chirp which had already grown so irritating in the ears of Denis de...

Excerpt: New Arabian Nights by Robert Louis Stevenson.

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Twelve Stories and a Dream

By: H. G. Wells

.................................................................. 76 8. THE NEW ACCELERATOR .............................................................. ...patience seems to have been due to a needless panic, Bootle, the notorious American scientific quack, having made an announcement that Filmer interpre... ...ty was the elastic lining of the contractile balloon. He found he needed a new substance, and in the discovery and manufacture of that new substance h... ...ve indistinctly, enormous self-assertive things, he backs into the rear of groups by instinct if Banghurst drops the line for a minute, and when he wa... ...breathing a little more freely. “Magic!” said the shopman, with a careless wave of the hand, and behold! sparks of coloured fire flew out of his finge... ...heart! No!” and the shopman swept the little men back again, shut the lid, waved the box in the air, and there it was, in brown paper, tied up and—wit... ...d only say “you should have tasted it!” and of fairy music, “like a little musical box,” that came out of nodding flowers. There was a great open plac...

................. 64 7. JIMMY GOGGLES THE GOD ................................................................................................ 76 8. THE NEW ACCELERATOR .................................................................................................... 88 9. MR. LEDBETTER?S VACATION.................................................................................

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In the Days of the Comet

By: H. G. Wells

... beautiful, and in some subtle quality, in this small difference and that, new to me and strange. They were in no fashion I could name, and the simple... ...nd I am out of touch with my youth. The old life seems so cut off from the new, so alien and so unreasonable, that at times I find it bordering upon t... ...ver with a treacly blue enamel and further decorated by a fringe of pinked American cloth insecurely fixed by tacks. Below this was a little table tha... ...ion of that ad- venture. Nettie was dressed in white, her hair went off in waves of soft darkness from above her dark shining eyes; there was a little... ...r home that idea the first book I got from the Institute happened to be an American edition of the collected works of Shelley, his gassy prose as well... ...s chilled and checked. Numbers of men stood about the streets in knots and groups, as corpuscles gather and catch in the blood-vessels in the opening ... ...le inactive, but there were a lot of people standing dispersedly in little groups, and with a general direction towards the gates of the Bantock Burde... ...mpos- sible that we could really have parted ourselves for good and all. A wave of tenderness flowed over me, and still flooded me as I came through t... ... decorative crock- ery, and hangings, and embroideries, and bad music, and musical instruments shared this fate. And books, countless books, too, and ...

...miles away marks a city. All the appointments of this room were orderly and beautiful, and in some subtle quality, in this small difference and that, new to me and strange. They were in no fashion I could name, and the simple costume the man wore suggested neither period nor country. It might, I thought, be the Happy Future, or Utopia, or the Land of Simple Dreams; an erra...

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Chance a Tale in Two Parts

By: Joseph Conrad

...e landing-stage before we went up to the riverside inn, where we found our new acquaintance eating his dinner in dignified loneliness at the head of a... ...hands. “That day I wouldn’t have called the Queen my cousin,” declared our new acquaintance enthusiastically. At that time the Marine Board examinatio... ...‘ere, so I …” “It’s all right I tell you,” Mr. Powell cut him short with a wave of his hand; and, as the old fraud walked off at last, he raised his e... ...g at the outer door, Fyne entered. I treated him without ceremony and only waved my hand towards a chair. Even before he sat down he gasped out: “We’v... ...ishment. Its consort The Sceptre collapsed within the week. I won’t say in American parlance that suddenly the bottom fell out of the whole of de Barr... ...y! But Mrs. Fyne’s fervent “thank goodness” turned out to be a bit, as the Americans—some Americans—say “previous.” In a very short time the odious fe... ...f one thing I am certain, and that is that Mrs. Fyne did not go out to the musical function that afternoon. She was no doubt considerably annoyed at m... ...ptain Anthony stood in the forefront of all men. We may suppose that these groups were not very large. He had gone to sea at a very early age. The fee...

...ost and skipper. We helped the boy we had with us to haul the boat up on the landing-stage before we went up to the riverside inn, where we found our new acquaintance eating his dinner in dignified loneliness at the head of a long table, white and inhospitable like a snow bank....

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House of Mirth

By: Edith Wharton

... some one, but he hardly knew why the idea arrested him. There was nothing new about Lily Bart, yet he could never see her without a faint movement of... ...t, he had always made use of the “argument from design.” “The resources of New Y ork are rather meagre,” he said; 5 Edith Wharton “but I’ll find a ha... ...sure in her nearness: in the modelling of her little ear, the crisp upward wave of her hair—was it ever so slightly brightened by art?—and the thick p... ...inattentively, and he saw that she was preoc- cupied with a new idea. “And Americana—do you collect Americana?” Selden stared and laughed. “No, that’s... ... good editions of the books I am fond of.” She made a slight grimace. “And Americana are horribly dull, I suppose?” “I should fancy so—except to the h... ... at herself between the candle-flames. The white oval of her face swam out waver- ingly from a background of shadows, the uncertain light blurring it ... ...ned away as she spoke, letting him strut at her side through the gathering groups on the terrace, while every nerve in her throbbed with the conscious... ...e after the princi- pal actors had left the stage; but among the remaining groups, Lily could discover neither Gryce nor the youngest Miss V an 91 Ed... ...men have got new clothes and the singers haven’t got new voices. My wife’s musical, you know—puts me through a course of this every winter. It isn’t s...

... of a very definite purpose. It struck him at once that she was waiting for some one, but he hardly knew why the idea arrested him. There was nothing new about Lily Bart, yet he could never see her without a faint movement of interest: it was characteristic of her that she always roused speculation, that her simplest acts seemed the result of far-reaching intentions....

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Memorials and Other Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

................................................... 4 FROM THE AUTHOR, TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF HIS WORKS. ................................................ ...condly, in hav- ing made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicitation or the shadow of any expectation on ... ...d usage, solely and merely upon your own spontaneous motion. Some of these new papers, I hope, will not be without their value in the eyes of those wh... ...of the mail, was transformed into a dream, as tumultuous and changing as a musical fugue. This troubled Dream is circumstantially reported in Section ... ...old to constitutional torpor, suddenly, and beyond all hope, had kindled a new and no- bler life. Occupied originally by no shadow of any earthly inte... ...pital disadvantage, in my eyes, that its chapel possessed no organ, and no musical ser- vice. But any other choice would have driven me to an in- stan... ...and returning homewards at intervals, with anxious and dissatisfied looks. Groups of both sexes were collected at every corner of the wider streets, k... ...lost its most efficient partisans, but, through their loss, determined the wavering against him, alienated the few who remained of his own faction, an... ...uttered, not a whisper; hardly a robe was heard to rustle, or a feather to wave. The twenty were rapidly reduced to twelve, these to six, the six to f...

...ience I had found from nervous depression to be absolutely insurmountable; secondly, in having made me a participator in the pecuniary profits of the American edition, without solicitation or the shadow of any expectation on my part, without any legal claim that I could plead, or equitable warrant in established usage, solely and merely upon your own spontaneous motion. So...

...HER PAPERS, VOL. I. ....................................................................................................... 4 FROM THE AUTHOR, TO THE AMERICAN EDITOR OF HIS WORKS. .......................................................... 4 EXPLANATORY NOTICES......................................................................................................................

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Aaron's Rod

By: D. H. Lawrence

.... Also the War was over, and there was a sense of relief that was almost a new menace. A man felt the violence of the nightmare released now into the ... ...cks was very red, the mangle with its put-up board was white-scrubbed, the American oil-cloth on the table had a gay pattern, there was a warm fire, t... ...pers: but now it was a clean white shirt, and his best black trousers, and new pink and white braces. He sat under the gas-jet of the back kitchen, lo... ...ars, and became only whiter and colder, set in more intense obsti- nacy. A wave of revulsion lifted him. He became aware that he was deadly antagonist... ...o quiet, they had the dangerous impassivity of the Bohemian, Pari- sian or American rather than English. “Cigarette, Julia?” said Robert to his wife. ... ...foliage. They gave a strange, perpendicular aspiration in the night. Julia waved slowly in her tree dance. Jim stood apart, with his legs straddled, a... ...s something like the keyboard of a piano: more still, like a succession of musical notes. For the rectangular planes of light were of different intens... ... Aaron’s Rod The whole party moved out on to the crimson-carpeted gangway. Groups of people stood about chatting, men and women were passing along, to... ...HE OPERA SEASON ENDED, Aaron was invited by Cyril Scott to join a group of musical people in a village by the sea. He accepted, and spent a pleasant m...

...rly twilight, and underfoot the earth was half frozen. It was Christmas Eve. Also the War was over, and there was a sense of relief that was almost a new menace. A man felt the violence of the nightmare released now into the general air. Also there had been another wrangle among the men on the pit-bank that evening....

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The English Mail-Coach and Joan of Arc

By: Thomas de Quincey

... of the notes have also been transferred from that volume. A number of the new notes I owe to a review of the Selections by Dr. Lane Cooper, of Cornel... ...es, which ac- cordingly appeared in the London Magazine in that year. This new sensation eclipsed Lamb’s Essays of Elia, which were ap- pearing in the... ...f the original subject is lost. De Quincey divides his writings into three groups: first, that class which “proposes primarily to amuse the reader, bu... ...tobiographic Sketches and the Literary Reminiscences. As a second class he groups “those papers which address them- selves purely to the understanding... ...d* miles— *“Three hundred”:—Of necessity, this scale of measurement, to an American, if he happens to be a thoughtless man, must sound ludicrous. Acco... ...less man, must sound ludicrous. Accordingly, I remember a case in which an American writer indulges himself in the luxury of a little fibbing, by ascr... ...g at intervals one hand to heaven, amidst the fiery crests of the pursuing waves and the raving of the storm; until at last, upon a sound from afar of... ...of the mail, was transformed into a dream, as tumultuous and changing as a musical fugue. This troubled dream is circumstantially reported in Section ...

...n have been taken from the Athenaeum Press Selections from De Quincey; many of the notes have also been transferred from that volume. A number of the new notes I owe to a review of the Selections by Dr. Lane Cooper, of Cornell University. I wish also to thank for many favors the Committee and officers of the Glasgow University Library....

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The Sea Wolf

By: Jack London

...rancisco Bay. Not but that I was afloat in a safe craft, for the Martinez was a new ferry steamer, making her fourth or fifth trip on the run between S... ...a few particular things, such as, for instance, the analysis of Poe’s place in American literature — an essay of mine, by the way, in the current Atla... ...le a chilling numbness was wrapping about my heart and creeping into it. Small waves, with spiteful foaming crests, continually broke over me and into... ...t of fear. I was alone. I could hear no calls or cries — only the sound of the waves, made weirdly hollow and reverberant by the fog. A panic in a cro... ...eet dragged him down. He was gone. “Johansen,” Wolf Larsen said briskly to the new mate, “keep all hands on deck now they’re here. Get in the topsails... ...ented, and I remarked Bulfinch’s “Age of Fable,” Shaw’s “History of English and American Literature,” and Johnson’s “Natural History” in two large volu... ... to the amusement of the sailors and hunters, who made a point of gathering in groups to witness my exit. The strain was too great. sometimes thought ... ... gat me men singers and women singers, and the delights of the sons of men, as musical instruments, and that of all sorts. “So I was great, and increa...

...ticular January Monday morning would not have found me afloat on San Francisco Bay. Not but that I was afloat in a safe craft, for the Martinez was a new ferrysteamer, making her fourth or fifth trip on the run between Sausalito and San Francisco. The danger lay in the heavy fog which blanketed the bay, and of which, as a landsman, I had little apprehension. In fact, I rem...

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The Ambassadors

By: Henry James

...qual opportunity university. 3 Henry James The Ambassadors by Henry James New York Edition (1909). Volume I Preface Nothing is more easy than to stat... ... of “The Ambassadors,” which first appeared in twelve numbers of The North American Review (1903) and was published as a whole the same year. The situ... ...s secrets. He would have issued, our rueful worthy, from the very heart of New England—at the heels of which matter of course a perfect train of secre... ...“arranged for”; its first appearance was from month to month, in the North American Review during 1903, and I had been open from far back to any pleas... ... my first care, I had thus inevitably to set him up a confidant or two, to wave away with energy the custom of the seated mass of explanation after th... ...is own likeness-poor Lambert Strether washed up on the sunny strand by the waves of a single day, poor Lam- bert Strether thankful for breathing-time ... ...ett—that he had already begun to take in. Who were they all, the dispersed groups and couples, the ladies even more unlike those of Woollett than the ... ...em. It might have been, on analysis, nothing more than Shakespeare and the musical glasses; but it had served all the purpose of his appearing to have...

...Excerpt: Volume I. Preface: Nothing is more easy than to state the subject of ?The Ambassadors,? which first appeared in twelve numbers of The North American Review (1903) and was published as a whole the same year. The situation involved is gathered up betimes, that is in the second chapter of Book Fifth, for the reader?s benefit, into as few words as possible-- planted ...

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The War in the Air

By: H. G. Wells

...e under notice to quit, the last patch of country in a district flooded by new and prbaa things. He did his best to console himself, to imagine matter... ...rench artichokes and aub- ergines, foreign apples—apples from the State of New York, apples from California, apples from Canada, apples from New Zeala... ...paper and cane as Tom had done, but with a penny packet of Boys of England American ciga- rettes. His language shocked his father before he was twelve... ... the removal of slums in Whitechapel had rendered available. The advancing wave soon produced a sympathetic ripple in the Bun Hill establishment. Grub... ...t was that particularly impressed Bert Smallways. “If them Germans or them Americans get hold of this,” he said impressively to his brother, “the Brit... ...t to them. They handled a line of cheap gramophones, and did a little with musical boxes. The staple of their business was, however, the letting of bi... ... ourselves—the Desert Dervishes.” They bowed profoundly. The few scattered groups upon the beach regarded them with horror for the most part, but some... ...d violently with a loud, heart-rend- ing cry of “Alfred! Save me!” And she waved her arms search- ingly, and then clasped Mr. Butteridge about. 45 H ... ... it seemed like a hand-to-hand scuffle in the sky. Then they broke up into groups and duels. The descent of German air-ships towards the lower sky inc...

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20, 000 Leagues under the Sea

By: Jules Verne

... months of the year 1867 the question seemed buried, never to revive, when new facts were brought before the public. It was then no longer a scien- ti... ...tached me to that expedition. After six months in Nebraska, I ar- rived in New York towards the end of March, laden with a precious collection. My dep... ...- tion of the day. How could I be otherwise? I had read and reread all the American and European papers without be- ing any nearer a conclusion. This ... ...ofes- 11 Jules Verne sor, and not give too much cause for laughter to the Americans, who laugh well when they do laugh. I reserved for myself a way o... ...ty of the crew, when some capricious whale raised its black back above the waves! The poop of the vessel was crowded on a moment. The cabins poured fo... ... animal gained on us, sport- 26 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea ing with the waves. It made the round of the frigate, which was then making fourteen kno... ...This group covers an area of 370 square leagues, and it is formed of sixty groups of islands, among which the Gambier group is remarkable, over which ... ...e chords. Captain Nemo was there, bending over his organ, and plunged in a musical ecstasy. “Captain!” He did not hear me. “Captain!” I said, touching... ...ith every sense, scarcely breathing; plunged, like Cap- tain Nemo, in that musical ecstasy, which was drawing him in spirit to the end of life. Then a...

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