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American New Wave Musical Groups (X)

       
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Virgin Soil

By: Ivan S. Turgenev

...up the insular confines in which they had been reared and to enlarge their new hori- zon. Afterwards they went on to read T olstoi, and T urgenev’s po... ... Virgin Soil, is the prophetic intention he had of the woman’s part in the new order. For the real hero of the tale, as Mr. Edward Garnett has pointed... ... have a talk if your visitors would not mind…” (He bowed to Mashurina, and waved a grey-gloved hand in the direction of Paklin and Ostrodumov.) “Not a... ...ake anything that would interfere with my freedom.” Sipiagin gave a slight wave of the hand, as if driving away a fly. “You may be easy on that point.... ... front of the house there was a flower garden, with straight gravel paths, groups of acacias and lilac, and round flower beds. T o the left, past the ... ...contained nothing but a few painted wooden chairs and a couch covered with American cloth. There were pictures everywhere of an indifferent variety . ... ...g to play such an important part; where his wife patronised the arts, gave musical evenings, and founded charitable cook- shops; where Kollomietzev wa... ...ands. They are not heroes, not even ‘heroes of labour’ as some crank of an American, or Englishman, called them in a book he wrote for the edification...

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Typee a Romance of the South Seas

By: Herman Melville

...le INTRODUCTION TO THE EDITION OF 1892 BY ARTHUR STEDMAN Of the trinity of American authors whose births made the year 1819 a notable one in our liter... ... fathers’ and moth- ers’ sides respectively, from have families of British New En- gland and Dutch New York extraction. Whitman and Van Velsor, Melvil... ...father of Herman, was an importing merchant,—first in Boston, and later in New York. He was a man of much cul- ture, and was an extensive traveller fo... ...e in old Greenwich Street, used to tell my brother and me of the monstrous waves at sea, moun- tain high, of the masts bending like twigs, and all abo... ...tsfield, Mass., ‘boarding around’ with the families of his pupils, in true American fashion, and easily suppressing, on one memorable occasion, the ef... ... of the Pacific came rolling along, with its surface broken by little tiny waves, sparkling in the sunshine. Every now and then a shoal of flying fish... ...s might be seen numbers of cocoanuts floating closely together in circular groups, and bobbing up and down with every wave. By some inexplicable means... ...along with spear. When we moved off in this order, the natives struck up a musical recitative, which with various alternations, they con- tinued until... ...enge, and, as soon as our palms met, he bent to- wards me, and murmured in musical accents—’How you do?’ ‘How long you been in this bay?’ ‘You like th...

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A Tale of Two Cities

By: Charles Dickens

...he air in ripples that visibly followed and overspread one another, as the waves of an unwholesome sea might do. It was dense enough to shut out every... ...fineness in accordance with his stockings, was as white as the tops of the waves that broke upon the neighbouring beach, or the specks of sail that gl... ...hat what they had was secured to your mother and to you. There has been no new discovery, of money, or of any other property; but “ He felt his wrist ... ...ted here and there, to cut off little streams of wine that started away in new directions; others devoted them selves to the sodden and lee dyed piec... ...he date of the very first action fought between the British troops and the Americans. That, for these reasons, the jury, being a loyal jury (as he kne... ...nhappily, I am!” The plaintive tone of her compassion merged into the less musical voice of the Judge, as he said something fiercely: “Answer the ques... ...here every fierce and furious expression was in vivid life, there were two groups of faces each seven in number so fixedly contrasting with the rest,...

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Twilight in Italy

By: D. H. Lawrence

...d accompanied by the great bishops, must have planted the holy idol like a new plant among the mountains, there where it multiplied and grew according... ...other looming shadowily under their hoods, the crucifixes seem to create a new atmosphere over the whole of the countryside, a darkness, a weight in t... ...la?’ He shows me the paper. It is an old scrap of print, the picture of an American patent door-spring, with directions: ‘Fasten the spring either end... ...ten the spring either end up. Wind it up. Never unwind.’ It is laconic and American. The signore watches me anx- iously, waiting, holding his chin. He... ...er breathed an iridescent dust on the far shore, where the vil- lages were groups of specks. On the low level of the world, on the lake, an orange- sa... ...d his long brown beard, whilst the faces of his family are arranged in two groups for the background. I think he is angry at our intrusion. He is very... ...stand very dark and isolated in their moments of stillness, they shout and wave to each other when anything occurs. The men are clean, their clothes a... ...is schoolmistress, and has a mortal dread of being wrong. ‘Si,’ she cries, wavering, appealing, ‘una dramma inglese.’ ‘English!’ I repeated. ‘Yes, an ... ...is loose throat and powerful limbs, his open, blue ex- tinct eyes, and his musical, slightly husky voice, that seemed to sound out of the past. 82 D....

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The Marble Faun : Or, The Romance of Monte Beni, Illustrated with Photogravures

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...te—almost—yes, I really think so,” replied Hilda, a slender, brown-haired, New England girl, whose percep- tions of form and expression were wonderful... ...more favored individuals did credit to Miriam’s selection. One was a young American sculptor, of high promise and rapidly increasing celebrity; the ot... ...adle. According to a third statement, she was the off-spring of a Southern American planter, who had given her an elabo- rate education and endowed he... ...ide and dreary precincts of the catacomb, seeking, as some say, to beguile new victims into his own misery; but, according to other statements, endeav... ...ot, as you will own, more than half a dozen positively original statues or groups in the world, and these few are of immemorial antiquity. A person fa... ...hing akin to the ideal. So, when the guests collected themselves in little groups, here and there, in the wide saloon, a cheerful and airy gossip be- ... ...still, we are almost afraid to say, it was seen, though with a fainter and wavering course, in the early morn of Christendom, when the Roman Empire ha... ...ive orchards; there, too, were fields of every kind of grain, among which, waved the Indian corn, putting Kenyon in mind of the fondly remembered acre... ...ichly dressed, scattering forth their laughter, shrill, yet sweet, and the musical babble of their voices, to thicken into an airy tumult over the hea...

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Night and Day

By: Virginia Woolf

...olf drawing-room, with its rich, irregular lights, as the flames leapt and wavered. “Dear things!” she exclaimed. “Dear chairs and tables! How like ol... ...he train towards Highgate. Although thus supported by the knowledge of his new possession of considerable value, he was not proof against the familiar... ... wall photo- graphs of bridges and cathedrals and large, unprepos- sessing groups of insufficiently clothed young men, sit- ting in rows one above ano... ... have the time. Why do you ask?” “It might be a good thing, to get to know new people, that’s all.” “Poor Ralph!” said Joan suddenly, with a smile. “Y... ...took part in a series of scenes such as the taming of wild ponies upon the American prairies, or the conduct of a vast ship in a hurricane round a bla... ...oint of going myself. And then I know I couldn’t live without this”—and he waved his hand towards the City of London, which wore, at this moment, the ... ... for it. She cast her eyes down in irritation, and read again her mother’s musical sentences about the silver gulls, and the roots of little pink flow... ...ust on the floor meditatively with the toe of his boot, he was roused by a musical and familiar voice behind him, ac- companied by a light touch upon ... ...ith relief, and she had merely to shake hands with Rodney and to greet the American lady who had come to be shown the relics, before the talk started ...

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Essays of Travel

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

..., the varied accents in which they converse, the crying of their children terrified by this new experience, or the clean flat smack of the parental ha... ... who deserve a special word of condemnation. One of them was Scots; the other claimed to be American; admitted, after some fencing, that he was born i... ...of her endeavour was bent upon keeping her watch true to Glasgow time till she should reach New York. They had heard reports, her husband and she, of ... ...ne, for instance, the composition of which he had bought years ago for five dollars from an American pedlar, and sold the other day for a hundred poun... ...ching them climb into the shrouds or on the rails, while the ship went swinging through the waves; and I admired and envied the courage of their moth-... ...fficult to keep ones footing on the deck. I have spoken of our con- certs. We were indeed a musical ship’s company, and cheered our way into exile wit... ...e floor of glittering sand, these trees that go streaming up like mon- strous sea-weeds and waver in the moving winds like the weeds in submarine curr... ... work of Richelieu complete. It is a people of lace-makers. The women sit in the streets by groups of five or six; and the noise of the bobbins is au-... ...eet where I was then living, their song, which was not much louder than a bee’s, but airily musical, kept me in a perpetual good humour. I put the cag...

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Modeste Mignon

By: Honoré de Balzac

...d Dumay to his wife, mak- ing her sit close by him. Madame Dumay, a little American about thirty-six years of age, wiped her eyes furtively; she adore... ...chant. He bought land and houses in the town, and des- patched a vessel to New York freighted with silks purchased in Lyons at reduced prices. He sent... ...dest little house in the rue Royale. The poor toiler had brought back from New Y ork, together with his cottons, a pretty little wife, attracted it wo... ... richest com- mercial house in Havre. Madame Dumay, a rather pretty little American, had the misfortune to lose all her children at their birth; and h... ...t. Why, the man talks about com- parisons that howl, rocks that faint, and waves of war! How- ever, he is only a travelling Englishman, and we must ex... ...empts at self-instruction came a phenomenon not uncommon to natures with a musical vo- cation; Modeste composed, as far as a person ignorant of the la... ...ly, for at least a month, Modeste had warbled the songs of night- ingales, musical rhapsodies whose poetry and meaning had roused the attention of her... ...- lis, excited in Modeste, they were as multifarious and con- fused as the waves which rushed to die along the shore while with her eyes fixed on the ... ...tscha,” said the duke, smiling. When the people on the quays, attracted in groups by the 165 Balzac splendor of the royal equipage, saw the funny spe...

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Women in Love

By: D. H. Lawrence

...ay. ‘I haven’t thought about him: I’ve refrained,’ she said coldly. ‘Yes,’ wavered Ursula; and the conversation was really at an end. The sisters foun... ...rt dwelling- houses, utterly formless and sordid, without poverty. Gudrun, new from her life in Chelsea and Sussex, shrank cruelly from this amorphous... ...k,’ said Gudrun, swerving away. ‘There are all those people.’ And she hung wavering in the road. ‘Never mind them,’ said Ursula, ‘they’re all right. T... ... glisten like sunshine refracted through crystals of ice. And he looked so new, unbroached, pure as an arctic thing. Perhaps he was thirty years old, ... ...aidservant came and went hurriedly. Meanwhile the men stood in calm little groups, chatting, smoking, pretending to pay no heed to the rustling anima-... ...y syllable distinctly. She looked at the cover, to verify herself. ‘An old American edition,’ said Birkin. ‘Ha!—of course—translated from the French,’... ...oked aside, feeling she was being belittled. People were standing about in groups, some women were sitting in the shade of the walnut tree, with cups ... ...hear the stars. She imagined distinctly she could hear the 405 celestial, musical motion of the stars, quite near at hand. She seemed like a bird fly... ...iked the West Afri- can wooden figures, the Aztec art, Mexican and Central American. He saw the grotesque, and a curious sort of me- chanical motion i...

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Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewit

By: Charles Dickens

...res whom we have deliberately suffered to be bred for misery and ruin. The American portion of this story is in no other respect a carica- ture than a... ...or the most part (Mr. Bevan ex- pected), of a ludicrous side, only, of the American character—of that side which was, four-and-twenty years ago, from ... ...LIC DINNER given to me on Saturday the 18th of April, 1868, in the city of New York, by two hundred representatives of the Press of the United States ... ...ges in the amount of land subdued and peopled, changes in the rise of vast new cities, changes in the growth of older cities almost out of recognition... ...ht, sir. Bless you for hating me. And good night!’ So saying, Mr Pecksniff waved his right hand with much solem- nity, and once more inserting it in h... ... wonderful shaped hats, hunting-whips, and rough sticks, standing about in groups, or talk- ing noisily together on the tavern steps, or paying and re... ...ell,’ rejoined Martin, throwing himself back in his chair, with a careless wave of both hands, as if the subject were quite settled, and nothing more ... ...ve of our separation, Mr Jinkins and the gentle- men have made up a little musical party among themselves, and do intend, in the dead of this night, t... ... when gentlemen sit up late they drink, and when they drink they’re not so musical, perhaps, as when they don’t. But this is the arrangement; and I kn...

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An Outcast of the Islands

By: Joseph Conrad

...e for me to face both ways I had elected to face nothing. The discovery of new values in life is a very chaotic 4 An Outcast of the Islands experienc... ...of skill—poker. He had been the aptest pupil of a steady-eyed, sententious American, who had drifted mysteriously into Macassar from the wastes of the... ...pt him—half-caste wife and all! Hooray! He saw his shadow dart forward and wave a hat, as big as a rum barrel, at the end of an arm several yards long... ...—and drunk I fancy,” said Mr. Vinck over his shoulder. “I saw him jump and wave his hat.” The crunching of the gravel stopped. “Horrid man,” said Mrs.... ...iting out-of-the-way places of that part of the world, always in search of new markets for his cargoes—not so much for profit as for the plea- sure of... ...sehold was reposing, Babalatchi and Lakamba passed silent amongst sleeping groups to the riverside, and, taking a canoe, paddled off stealthily on the... ...of laughter, a loud hail, a name or a joke sent out in a soft drawl. Small groups squatted round the little fires, and the monotonous undertone of tal... ...rbarians, persistent, steady, repeating itself in the soft syl- lables, in musical tones of the never-ending dis- courses of those men of the forests ...

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A Set of Six

By: Joseph Conrad

...mo; but apart from the locality, and that a pretty wide one (all the South American Continent), the novel and the story have nothing in common, neithe... ...e mut- tering of a bull. “‘Cut, Señor teniente. Cut!’ “I drew my sword, my new unblunted sword that had seen no service as yet, and severed the many t... ...n with that feeling of superiority the success of our cause inspired in us Americans. I suppose I re- ally despised him because he was an old Castilia... ...d a fine house there. At the same time the division of Robles was moved to new can- tonments near the capital. This change suited very well the state ... ...lusion that there must be some untrustworthy elements amongst the Lon- don groups. And I came over to see what could be done quietly. “My first step w... ... I acknowledged this interesting communication by a sympathetic murmur. He waved his hand carelessly. “This might have utterly spoiled a chap’s nerve ... ...uldn’t get an inch out of that ship. Again the pilot blew his whistle, and waved his arm to port. We could see the tug’s paddles turning faster and fa... ... that it dated from the time they were holding garrison in Strasbourg. The musical surgeon shook his head at that. It went much farther back, he thoug... ...ut the band had broken up, and were entering the alley in small conversing groups. The Count sat up straight and tried to think calmly of what had hap...

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Waverley or Tis Sixty Years Since

By: Sir Walter Scott

...E by SIR WALTER SCOTT A Penn State Electronic Classics Series Publication Waverley or ‘Tis Sixty Years Since by Sir Walter Scott is a publication of ... ...in the document or for the file as an electronic transmission, in any way. Waverley or ‘Tis Sixty Years Since by Sir Walter Scott, the Pennsylvania St... ...of a far more formidable description than was commanded by the adventurous American. Time and circumstances change the character of nations and the fa... ... a court, had for some time been gradually reconciling them- selves to the new dynasty. But the wealthy country gentle- men of England, a rank which r... ...es reached the ears of Sir Everard at once, there can be no doubt that the new commissioner would have had little reason to pique himself on the succe... ...she uttered that might be proposed in example to ladies of much supe- rior musical talent. Her natural good sense taught her, that if, as we are assur... ...ibility to poetry, and power of combining its expression with those of the musical notes, that her singing gave more plea- sure to all the unlearned i... ...l effects either upon the brain or constitution. At length the fluctuating groups began to swim before the eyes of our hero as they gradually closed; ... ...re than he himself could have expected; but it is men- tioned of the North American Indians, when at the stake of torture, that on the least intermiss...

Excerpt: Waverley or ?Tis Sixty Years Since by Sir Walter Scott.

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Virginibus Puerisque, And Other Papers

By: Robert Louis Stevenson

...ion really happy. She has a pleasing voice, with which she accompanies her musical instrument with judgment. She has an easy polite- ness in her manne... ...es the point entirely, a wordy, prolegomenous babbler will often add three new offences in the process of excusing one. It is really a most delicate a... ...a scruple; we theorise with a pistol to our head; we are confronted with a new set of conditions on which we have not only to pass a judgment, 43 Vir... ... undisturbed song of pure concent” to which we are ever likely to lend our musical voices. CHAPTER III – AN APOLOGY FOR IDLERS “Boswell: We grow weary... ...y) takes his determination, votes for the six- pences, and in the emphatic Americanism, it “goes for” them. And while such an one is ploughing distres... ...on some Olympian errand. Here and there, indeed, a few children huzzah and wave their hands to the express; but for the most part it is an interruptio... ...ck and sunlight; of the relief of cypresses; of the troubled, busy-looking groups of sea-pines, that seem always as if they were being wielded and swe... ... yet, when one comes to think upon it calmly, the situation of these South American citizens forms only a very pale figure for the state of ordinary m... ...les which seemed to marshal the Romans on their way; they did not pause or waver, but disappeared into the forest where the enemy lay concealed. “Forw...

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Guy Mannering

By: Sir Walter Scott

...by Sir Walter Scott INTRODUCTION TO GUY MANNERING. THE NOVEL OR ROMANCE of Waverley made its way to the public slowly, of course, at first, but afterw... ...ory to domestic happiness.—So ended John MacKinlay’s legend. The author of Waverley had imagined a possibility of fram- ing an interesting, and perhap... ...needna be feared—I never saw ony mysell, and we’re just at the door o’ the New Place.” Accordingly, leaving the ruins on the right, a few steps brough... ...r and with- drawing room, full of all manner of cross lights. This was the New Place of Ellangowan, in which we left our hero, better amused perhaps t... ...is time, when there’s sae little money stirring in Scotland wi’ this weary American war, that somebody may get the land a bargain—Deil be in them, tha... ...who was to usher him to the man of law. The period was near the end of the American war. The desire of room, of air, and of decent accommodation, had ... ...e, its variety of lights, and the eternally changing bustle of its hundred groups, offers, by night espe- cially, a spectacle, which, though composed ... ...w, so we must make the most of our conquest to-night.” This led to another musical trial of skill, and that to lively conversation. At length, when th...

...Excerpt: Introduction To Guy Mannering. The novel or romance of Waverley made its way to the public slowly, of course, at first, but afterwards with such accumulating popularity as to encourage the author to a second attempt. He looked about for a name and a subject; and the manner in whi...

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The C‘Sars

By: Thomas de Quincey

...ll confine ourselves as much as possible to those which are susceptible of new as- pects. For the whole gallery of those who follow, we can un- dertak... ...and extensive ravages by fire, such as now happen, not unfrequently in the American woods, (but gen- erally from carelessness in scattering the glowin... ...n has ever been applied to them, and that many might easily be placed in a new light. Indeed, the whole of this most momentous sec- tion of ancient hi... ...nd occupied 62 The Cæsars the rest of the day with experiments on certain musical in- struments of recent invention, in which the keys were moved by ... ...n artist to be thus violently snatched away, and on the calamitous fate of musical sci- ence, which then stood on the brink of so dire an eclipse. In ... ...tonines, making seventeen emperors, compose the first of four nearly equal groups, who occupied the throne in succession until the extinction of the W... ...ation of the coming storm had been felt far to the south of Rome. One long wave *“Thirteen thousand chambers.”—The number of the cham- bers in this pr...

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The Duchesse de Langeais, With an Episode under the Terror, The Illustrious Gaudissart, A Passion in the Desert, And the Hidden Masterpiece

By: Honoré de Balzac

... some globe-cataclysm; it rises up a straight wall from the base where the waves gnaw at the stone below high-water mark. Any assault is made impossib... ...ble by the dangerous reefs that stretch far out to sea, with the sparkling waves of the Mediterranean playing over them. So, only from the sea can you... ...of things divine are blent with a grandeur unknown before, are decked with new glory and might. Out of the dim daylight, and the deep silence broken b... ...ast imprudence might compromise the whole future of his love, and ruin the new hopes. The organ sounded, but it was another player, and not the nun of... ...ould not refuse to accept it. When he 47 Balzac fell back again among the groups of men gathered at a dis- tance from the women, his friends congratu... ...ain, some man whose soul vibrates with the throb of passion, may take up a musical theme, and lo! heaven is opened for them, or they find a language f... ... The poignant irony of her answer had changed before the end into the most musical accents in which a woman could find utterance for ingenuous love. T... ... island, 128 The Duchesse de Langeais and the crew of the vessel were all American sailors, who spoke nothing but English. One of M. de Montriveau’s ...

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Mcteague : A Story of San Francisco

By: Frank Norris

... were a small marble-topped centre table covered with back numbers of “The American System of Den- tistry,” a stone pug dog sitting before the little ... ...tings took place here and there; a conversation was begun; others arrived; groups were formed; little impromptu receptions were held be- fore the chop... ...knew absolutely nothing further than that she 17 Frank Norris was Spanish-American. Miss Baker was the oldest lodger in the flat, and Maria was a fix... ... only her that he saw and felt, it was the woman, the whole sex, an entire new humanity, strange and alluring, that he seemed to have discovered. How ... ...e sweated with terror; inarticulate sounds came from his crammed mouth; he waved his arms wildly; all the four dogs caught the excitement and began to... ...und this impos- sible. The dogs would not follow. Only Alexander, Marcus’s new setter, kept his place at the rear of the car. The other three lost the... ...o let it pass. Marcus put a nickel and two crossed pins upon the rail, and waved his hat to the passengers as the train roared past. The chil- dren sh... ...re by the orchestra, after which came “The Gleasons, in their mirth-moving musical farce, entitled ‘McMonnigal’s Court-ship.’” This was to be followed... ...ter this came a great array of other “artists” and “specialty performers,” musical wonders, acro- bats, lightning artists, ventriloquists, and last of...

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Dead Souls

By: D. J. Hogarth

...v himself is now gener- ally regarded as a universal character. We find an American professor, William Lyon Phelps*, of Yale, holding the opinion that... ...ut meeting scores of Chichikovs; indeed, he is an accurate portrait of the American promoter, of the successful commercial trav- eller whose success d... ...usly: “I am once more a free Cossack.” Between 1834 and 1835 he produced a new series of stories, including his famous Cloak, which may be regarded as... ...stoy, 1860; St. John’s Eve and Other Stories, trans. by Isabel F. Hapgood, New York, Crowell, 1886; Taras Bulba: Also St. John’s Eve and Other Stories... ...nd plump, some of them had beards, and in no case was their hair curled or waved or arranged in what the French call “the devil-may- care” style. On t... ... clumps of lilac and yellow acacia. Also, there were a few insignifi- cant groups of slender-leaved, pointed-tipped birch trees, with, under two of th... ...tarched dickey: and soon the scheme be- gan to work. The surly Chief Clerk wavered for a while; then ended by inviting Chichikov to tea. Nor could any... ...ht, one in the middle, and one to the left, after the fashion of triumphal groups of statuary. Above them, on the box seat, were seated a coachman and... ... for instance?” “For a young man, dancing, the playing of one or an- other musical instrument, and—well, yes, marriage.” “Marriage to whom?” “To some ...

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Bleak House

By: Charles Dickens

... slipping and sliding since the day broke (if this day ever broke), adding new deposits to the crust upon crust of mud, sticking at those points tenac... ... little plaintiff or defendant who was promised 9 Bleak House – Dickens a new rocking horse when Jarndyce and Jarndyce should be settled has grown up... ..., you know.” The old housekeeper, with a gracious severity of deport ment, waves her hand towards the great staircase. Mr. Guppy and his 90 Bleak Hou... ...He has shown nothing but his shell. As easily might the tone of a delicate musical instrument be inferred from its case, as the tone of Mr. T ulkingho... ... to Allegory and meditation. By this time the news has got into the court. Groups of its inhabitants assemble to discuss the thing, and the outposts o... ... at all.” At length, one afternoon a little before sunset, when the bright groups of figures which have for the last hour or two 164 Bleak House – Di... ...n, and the hall was blocked up by a grand piano, a harp, and several other musical instru ments in cases, all in progress of removal, and all looking... ...ere in my thoughts.” “I hope I was not the trouble, guardian?” He slightly waved his hand and fell into his usual manner. The change was so remarkable... ...ghts as I lie here. T ake an extreme case. T ake the case of the slaves on American plantations. I dare say they are worked hard, I dare say they don’...

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