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American New Wave Musical Groups (X)

       
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The Marble Faun : Or, The Romance of Monte Beni, Illustrated with Photogravures

By: Nathaniel Hawthorne

...n a garment that might, by this time, have been centuries old, though ever new. In the dry Italian air, how- ever, Nature had only so far adopted this... ...om his own experience, and perhaps considered himself as communicat- ing a new truth to mankind. They were now advancing up the courtyard; and the lon... ...ith his eyes one of the figures, which was repeated many times over in the groups upon the walls and ceiling. It formed the principal link of an alleg... ...still, we are almost afraid to say, it was seen, though with a fainter and wavering course, in the early morn of Christendom, when the Roman Empire ha... ...ive orchards; there, too, were fields of every kind of grain, among which, waved the Indian corn, putting Kenyon in mind of the fondly remembered acre... ... those to the northward, for example, have often sug- gested sculpturesque groups, figures, and attitudes; they are especially rich in attitudes of li... ...r worth his pencil than the newly painted pine boxes, in which—if he be an American—his countrymen live and thrive. But there is reason to suspect tha... ...the V atican, with my palette and my brushes, and shall look for my little American artist that sees into the very heart of the grand pictures! And wh... ...ichly dressed, scattering forth their laughter, shrill, yet sweet, and the musical babble of their voices, to thicken into an airy tumult over the hea...

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Redgauntlet

By: Sir Walter Scott

...d upon. The minis- ters, however, thought it proper to leave Dr. Cameron’s new schemes in concealment, lest, by divulging them, they had indicated the... ...he soul from the body; yet Dr. R— did but hint that the better air of this new district was more favourable to my health, as I was then suffering unde... ...y wake in the next world. The sky threatens a blast that will bring in the waves three feet abreast.’ So saying, he turned his horse and rode off, whi... ...h a vengeance; sounds as of distant-thunder (the noise of the more distant waves, doubtless, on the shore) mingled with the roaring of the neighbourin... ...d, well-made, white-ankled Thetis, who had obtained me manumission from my musical task. This was nothing less than the sudden appearance of the old w... ...a ram when be makes his race, darted off right down the street, scattering groups of weatherbeaten lairds and periwigged burgesses, and bearing down a... ...ght is by no means an improb- able fiction. Shortly after the close of the American war, Sir James Graham of Netherby constructed a dam-dyke, or cauld...

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Bleak House

By: Charles Dickens

... slipping and sliding since the day broke (if this day ever broke), adding new deposits to the crust upon crust of mud, sticking at those points tenac... ...little plaintiff or defendant who was promised 9 Bleak House – Vol. One a new rocking horse when Jarndyce and Jarndyce should be settled has grown up... ..., you know.” The old housekeeper, with a gracious severity of deport ment, waves her hand towards the great staircase. Mr. Guppy and his 90 Bleak Hou... ...He has shown nothing but his shell. As easily might the tone of a delicate musical instrument be inferred from its case, as the tone of Mr. T ulkingho... ... to Allegory and meditation. By this time the news has got into the court. Groups of its inhabitants assemble to discuss the thing, and the outposts o... ... at all.” At length, one afternoon a little before sunset, when the bright groups of figures which have for the last hour or two 164 Bleak House – Vo... ...n, and the hall was blocked up by a grand piano, a harp, and several other musical instru ments in cases, all in progress of removal, and all looking... ...ere in my thoughts.” “I hope I was not the trouble, guardian?” He slightly waved his hand and fell into his usual manner. The change was so remarkable... ...ghts as I lie here. T ake an extreme case. T ake the case of the slaves on American plantations. I dare say they are worked hard, I dare say they don’...

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Floor Games

By: H. G. Wells

...nd inspiring ideas in them for after life. The men of tomor- row will gain new strength from nursery floors. I am going to tell of some of these games... ...me, and in a thou- sand permutations and combinations, belong to four main groups. We have (1) SOLDIERS, and with these I class sail- ors, railway por... ...lities. Zulus and foreign-looking persons, such as East Indian cavalry and American Indians, are also disfranchised. So are riderless horses and camel... ... of the city does there seem to be the slightest restraint upon the use of musical instruments. It is no place for neurotic people. The gardens contai... ...is knocked over in the excitement of the moment, the train starts, and we “wave a long, regretful farewell to the salubrious cheerfulness of Chamois C...

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The Pickwick Papers

By: Charles Dickens

....C.M. P.C., and three other Pickwickians hereinafter named, for forming a new branch of United Pickwickians, under the title o f The Corresponding... ... a canine skin collar, and the latter communicating additional lustre to a new green shoot ing coat, plaid neckerchief, and closely fitted drabs. Mr.... ...nevertheless distinctly visible. His long, black hair escaped in negligent waves from beneath each side of his old pinched up hat; and glimpses of his... ...ak T ree! And slily he traileth along the ground, And his leaves he gently waves, As he joyously hugs and crawleth round The rich mould of dead men’s ... ...leman wants his boots directly.’ ‘Well, you are a nice young ‘ooman for a musical party, you are,’ said the boot cleaner. ‘Look at these here boots—e... ...the coach rolls swiftly past the fields and orchards which skirt the road, groups of women and children, piling the fruit in sieves, or gathering the ... ...f steps, leading to the house door, which was guarded on either side by an American aloe in a green tub, the sedan chair stopped. Mr. Pickwick and his... ...turn both Mr. Jingle and his attendant, down the flight of steps, into the American aloe tubs that stood beneath. ‘Having discharged my duty, Sir,’ sa... ...uds. All this was gall and wormwood to the heart of Gabriel Grub; and when groups of children bounded out of the houses, tripped across the road, and ...

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The Tale of Chloe an Episode in the History of Beau Beamish

By: George Meredith

...e most innocent of angels. Hitherto we have lived …. T o her it has been a new world. But she is beginning to find it a narrow one. No, no, she is not... ...heir native cacophony. But they love it, as they love bacon and beans. The musical taste of our people is in the stage of the primitive appetite for n... ...ation and a countenance to the people, combined with the excitement of the new scenes and the marching music to banish the acuter sense of disappoint-... ...the treasure-laden Spanish galleon for whom, on her voyage home from South American waters, our enter- prising light-craft privateers lay in wait, she... ...t. In the afternoon, on the parade, they were joined by Mr. Camwell, among groups of fashionable ladies and their es- corts, pacing serenely, by medic... ...u rob no one,’ she said, in a voice that curled through him deliciously by wavering; but I think I may blush at recollections, and I would rather have... ... illuminations of the Colonel’s proceedings were a pasture to the rearward groups, composed of two very grand ladies, 54 The Tale of Chloe Caseldy, M... ...and without a picture. Her con- templation of it, contrasted with the life waved to her view by the timepiece, set her whole system rageing; she burne...

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Mankind in the Making

By: H. G. Wells

...nduct. It is an attempt to deal with social and politi- cal questions in a new way and from a new starting-point, viewing the whole social and politic... ...ions, that are becoming, that have become, provincial in proportion to our new and wider needs. My instances are commonly British, but all the broad p... ...lish-speaking man. No doubt the spirit of the inquiry is more British than American, that the aban- donment of Rousseau and anarchic democracy is more... ...e aban- donment of Rousseau and anarchic democracy is more com- plete than American thought is yet prepared for, but that is a difference not of quali... ...f Matter, thrusting us ruthlessly before it, as a strong swimmer thrusts a wave before him as he swims. That the personal egotism should be subordinat... ...nd if in the future it should be found possible to divide up humanity into groups, some of which could pair with one another only to the disadvantage ... ...ining I mean the differentiation of sounds—articu- late, inarticulate, and musical—fixing the child’s attention and causing it to imitate. As every so... ...lve or fourteen. But, beginning early—as early as pos- sible—every child, ‘musical’ or not, can be trained, just as every child, ‘artistic’ or not, ma... ...ols, the Schools are to blame. Something in the nature of Reform has to be waved over our schools. It would be a wicked deed to write anything that mi...

...resents a general theory of social development and of social and political conduct. It is an attempt to deal with social and political questions in a new way and from a new starting-point....

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An Englishman Looks at the World Being a Series of Unrestrained Remarks Upon Contemporary Matters

By: H. G. Wells

................................................................... 15 OF THE NEW REIGN .................................................................... ..................................................................... 182 THE AMERICAN POPULATION .......................................................... ...e experimen- talists in gliding one strong enough and light enough for the new purpose. And here we are! Or, rather, M. Blériot is! What does it mean ... ...ory of this development and arrive at any other conclusion. The French and Americans can laugh at our aeroplanes, the Ger- mans are ten years ahead of... ...lating movement, leaping with a light splashing pat upon the wa- ter, from wave to wave. Then we came about into the wind and rose, and looking over I... ... as dreaming. I watched the widening dis- tance between our floats and the waves. It wasn’t by any means a windless day; there was a brisk, fluctuatin... ...e the aeroplane routes along the line of the world’s coast- lines and lake groups and waterways. The airmen will go to and fro over water as the midge... ...of adapting itself to them has been no more than patching. Individuals and groups and trades have found themselves in imperfectly apprehended and diff... ...ays been his dream to have a piano. The youngest girl, he is convinced, is musical. As a man who has knocked about the world and has thought, he quite...

...10 OFF THE CHAIN........................................................................................................................... 15 OF THE NEW REIGN .................................................................................................................... 20 WILL THE EMPIRE LIVE? ............................................................................

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Man and Superman a Comedy and a Philosophy

By: George Bernard Shaw

...knew your man. It is hardly fifteen years since, as twin pio- neers of the New Journalism of that time, we two, cradled in the same new sheets, made a... ...aperone; and even the Times must sometimes 4 GB Shaw thank its stars that new plays are not produced every day, since after each such event its gravi... ... and then disparage it as unworthy and indelicate. We laugh at the haughty American nation be- cause it makes the negro clean its boots and then prove... ...ng about our imperial destiny; but our eyes and hearts turn eagerly to the American millionaire. As his hand goes down to his pocket, our fingers go u... ...eantry, this effusive loyalty, this officious rising and uncover- ing at a wave from a flag or a blast from a brass band? Impe- rialism: Not a bit of ... ...’s like hearing an ironclad talk about being at the mercy of the winds and waves. OCTAVIUS. This is not fair, Jack. She is an orphan. And you ought to... ...it is impossible for us to under- take a joint arrangement. ANN. [in a low musical voice] Mamma— MRS WHITEFIELD. [hastily] Now, Ann, I do beg you not ... ...er for the day. Go as you please until morning. The Brigands disperse into groups lazily. Some go into the cave. Others sit down or lie down to sleep ... ... clarionet turning this tune into infinite sadness: (Here there is another musical staff.) The yellowish pallor moves: there is an old crone wandering...

...you to justify. You were of mature age when you made the suggestion; and you knew your man. It is hardly fifteen years since, as twin pioneers of the New Journalism of that time, we two, cradled in the same new sheets, made an epoch in the criticism of the theatre and the opera house by making it a pretext for a propaganda of our own views of life. So you cannot plead igno...

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Madame Bovary

By: Gustave Flaubert

...Chapter One W E WERE IN CLASS when the head-master came in, followed by a “new fellow,” not wearing the school uniform, and a school servant car- ryin... ...ory, he will go into one of the upper classes, as be- comes his age.” The “new fellow,” standing in the corner behind the door so that he could hardly... ...ding amid the green corn, soon lengthened out, and broke up into different groups that loitered to talk. The fiddler walked in front with his violin, ... ... the foot of an immense green-sward, on which some cows were grazing among groups of large trees set out at regular intervals, while large beds of arb... ...rawled or rested. The sun pierced with a ray the small blue bubbles of the waves that, breaking, fol- lowed each other; branchless old willows mirrore... ...along the slippery banks. They had often walked there to the murmur of the waves over the moss-covered pebbles. How bright the sun had been! What happ... ...r for calls. I saw that the very moment that I came in. I’ve the eye of an American!” He did not send the stuff; he brought it. Then he came again to ... ...n be- gan to sing— “One night, do you remember, we were sailing,” etc. Her musical but weak voice died away along the waves, and the winds carried off... ...at is to say, the beginning of win- ter, that she seemed seized with great musical fervour. One evening when Charles was listening to her, she began t...

...Excerpt: PART I. Chapter One. We were in class when the head-master came in, followed by a ?new fellow,? not wearing the school uniform, and a school servant carrying a large desk. Those who had been asleep woke up, and every one rose as if just surprised at his work. The head-master made a sign to us to sit down. T...

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The Maine Woods

By: Henry David Thoreau

... proposed to make excursions to Mount Ktaadn, the second highest mountain in New England, about thirty miles distant, and to some of the lakes of the ... ...n the sunlight, — think how it stands with it now, — sold, perchance, to the New England Friction Match Company! There were in 1837, as I read, two hu... ... from fourteen to sixteen dollars. There was something refreshing and wildly musical to my ears in the very name of the white man’s canoe, reminding m... ...iling here and there on its surface, and a solitary loon, like a more living wave, — a vital spot on the lake’s surface, — laughed and frolicked, and ... ...the lake. “Why should we yet our sail unfurl? There is not a breath the blue wave to curl! But, when the wind blows off the shore, O sweetly we ’ll re... ...s; these, I think, were all beside ourselves. In the saloon was some kind of musical instrument, cherubim, or seraphim, to soothe the angry waves; and... ...of our domains before the dew was off, and found that the ground hemlock, or American yew, was the prevailing under shrub. We breakfasted on tea, hard... ...ot the invention of historians and poets. It was a purely wild and primitive American sound, as much as the barking of a chickaree, and I could not un... ... of the lumberer. They are of a social habit, growing in “veins,” “clumps,” “groups,” or “communities,” as the explorers call them, distinguishing the...

...from the Houlton military road, and five miles beyond the last log-hut, I proposed to make excursions to Mount Ktaadn, the second highest mountain in New England, about thirty miles distant, and to some of the lakes of the Penobscot, either alone or with such company as I might pick up there. It is unusual to find a camp so far in the woods at that season, when lumbering o...

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Anna Karenina

By: Leo Tolstoy, Graf

...led with the housekeeper, and wrote to a friend asking her to look out for a new situation for her; the man cook had walked of the day before just at ... ...e! Alabin was giving a dinner at Darmstadt; no, not Darmstadt, but something American. Yes, but then, Darmstadt was in America. Yes, Alabin was giving... ...e children to put on for their walk? Should they have any milk? Should not a new cook be sent for?” “Ah, let me alone, let me alone!” she said, and go... ... know his character, that faculty of forgetting everything, everything” (she waved her hand before her forehead), “that faculty of being completely ca... ...ost imperceptibly about the room; the party settled itself, divided into two groups: one round the samovar near the hostess, the other at the opposite... ...lack velvet, with sharply defined black eyebrows. In both groups conversation wavered, as it always does, for the first few minutes, broken up by meetin... ...lihood by the Board of Irrigation, espe cially one highly conscientious and musical family: all the daughters played on stringed instruments, and Ale... ...ll and blooming, but in the happiest frame of mind. She was talking rapidly, musically, and with exceptionally correct articulation and expressive int... ...here I call upon the count, and in three words we settle the business.” “The American way of doing business,” said Sviazhsky, with a smile. “Yes, ther...

...s. The children ran wild all over the house; the English governess quarreled with the housekeeper, and wrote to a friend asking her to look out for a new situation for her; the man-cook had walked of the day before just at dinner-time; the kitchen-maid, and the coachman had given warning. Three days after the quarrel, Prince Stepan Arkadyevitch Oblonsky--Stiva, as he was c...

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Leaves of Grass

By: Walt Whitman

... the Day ....................................................132 Are You the New Person Drawn Toward Me?................................................. ... mates the chants resuming, (Tallying Earth’s soil, trees, winds, tumultuous waves,) Ever with pleas’d smile I may keep on, Ever and ever yet the vers... ...with varying fortune, with flight, advance and retreat, victory deferr’d and wavering, (Yet methinks certain, or as good as certain, at the last,) the... ... OREIGN L ANDS I heard that you ask’d for something to prove this puzzle the New World, And to define America, her athletic Democracy, Therefore I sen... .... With firm and regular step they wend, they never stop, Successions of men, Americanos, a hundred millions, One generation playing its part and passi... ...or backward towards me to listen, With eyes retrospective towards me. 3 Americanos! conquerors! marches humanitarian! Foremost! century marches! ... ...ge! Warblings under the sun, usher’d as now, or at noon, or setting, Strains musical flowing through ages, now reaching hither, I take to your reckles... ...from the crowd steps the marksman, takes his position, levels his piece; The groups of newly come immigrants cover the wharf or levee, As the woolly p... ...each other, The youth lies awake in the cedar roof’d garret and harks to the musical rain, The Wolverine sets traps on the creek that helps fill the H...

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The Enormous Room

By: E. E. Cummings

...e criminal to delay any longer calling to your atten- tion a crime against American citizenship in which the French Government has persisted for many ... ...ment has persisted for many weeks—in spite of constant appeals made to the American Minister at Paris; and in spite of subse- quent action taken by th... ... ever since I received your cable, arrived this morning. My son arrived in New York on January 1st. He was in bad shape physically as a result of his ... ...l reminder of official hospitality. He is, at present, visiting friends in New 7 e e cummings York. If he were here, I am sure he would join with me ... ... to approach the Renault (in which B.’s baggage was already deposited) and waved me into the F .I.A.T ., bed, bed-roll and all; whereupon t-d leaped i... ...window I saw my friend drive away with t-d Number 2 and Nemo; then, having waved hasty farewell to all les Américains that I knew—three in number—and ... ... voice: “O Jack, give me a cigarette.” A handsome face, dark, Latin smile, musical fingers strong. I waded suddenly through a group of gendarmes (they... ...s personal and exclusive use. All this time he has been singing loudly and musically the following sumptu- ously imaginative ditty: “mEEt me tonIght... ...acé was the kinetic aspect of that institution; the arrivals, singly or in groups, of nouveaux of sundry nationalities whereby our otherwise more or l...

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Three Soldiers

By: John Dos Passos

...re in right with him, but the lieutenant’s a stinker … . Where you from?” “New York,” said the rookie, a little man of thirty with an ash-colored face... ... ye, when you get home, rookie … . But you’re in luck.” “Why?” “Bein’ from New York. The corporal, Tim Sidis, is from New York, an’ all the New York f... ...re a pair of eyes glinted in the white flick- ering light from the screen. Waves of laughter or of little exclamations passed over them. They were all... ...limpse of Chris standing with his arm about Andrews’s shoulders. They both waved. Fuselli grinned and expanded his chest. They were just rookies still... ...d went unsteadily to the rail, keeping, as he threaded his way through the groups that covered the transport’s after deck, a little of his cowboy’s bo... ...buttons on their khaki uniforms, among whom was a good sprinkling of lanky Americans. “T ommies,” said Fuselli to himself. After standing in line a wh... ...ad just made a coup de main and captured a whole trenchful.” “Of who?” “Of Americans—of us!” “The hell you say!” “That’s a goddam lie,” shouted a blac... ...shadow. When he tried to seize hold of his thoughts, to give them definite musical expression in his mind, he found himself suddenly empty, the way a ... ...Vain En- deavor? I guess you didn’t go round with the intellectual set … . Musical people often don’t … . Of course I don’t mean the Village. All anar...

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Essays

By: Ralph Waldo Emerson

......................................................................... 301 NEW ENGLAND REFORMERS ........................................................ ......................................................................... 315 NEW ENGLAND REFORMERS ........................................................ ...eading those fine apostrophes to sleep, to the stars, rocks, mountains and waves, I feel time passing away as 18 Essays an ebbing sea. I feel the ete... ... idols are Italy, England, Egypt, retains its fascination for all educated Americans. They who made England, Italy, or Greece venerable in the imagina... ...r of thought and quaint expression are as near to us as to any, and if the American artist will study with hope and love the precise thing to be done ... ...corn, grind it in his hand-mill, and bake his bread himself.” Society is a wave. The wave moves onward, but the water of which it is composed does not... ... party or common nature is not social; it is impersonal; is God. And so in groups where debate is earnest, and especially on high questions, the compa... ...bulk left out, and the spirit or moral of it contracted 180 Essays into a musical word, or the most cunning stroke of the pencil? But the artist must... ...rt of human character,—a wonderful expression through stone, or canvas, or musical sound, of the deepest and simplest attributes of our nature, and th...

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The French Revolution a History

By: Thomas Carlyle

..................................................... 275 Chapter 2.4.V . The New Berline. ................................................................. ...auroux, with her band-boxes and rouge-pots, at his side; so that, at every new station, a wooden gallery must be run up between their lodgings. He has... ...tte’s music-party in the Park: all Birds of Paradise flying from thee, and musical windpipes grow- ing mute. (Campan, i. 197.) Thou unclean, yet unmal... ... skilful is he, the whole world now looks. Three long years it lasts; with wavering fortune. In fine, after labours comparable to the Twelve of Hercul... ...s, it is said, What a spec- tacle! Now too behold our Deane, our Franklin, American Pleni- potentiaries, here in position soliciting; (1777; Deane som... ...that super-sublime of modesty! Yet, on the whole, our good Saint-Pierre is musical, poetical though most morbid: we will call his Book the swan-song o... ...ow; or even, if refractory, to alight altogether, and kneel: from Madame a wave of her plumes, a smile of her fair face, there where she sits, shall s... ...uzzing in eager expectancy, begins heaping and shaping itself into organic groups. Which organic groups, again, hold smaller organic grouplets: the in... ...ant glances on the Bust of Lafayette, which has stood there ever since the American War of Liberty. Whereupon, by acclamation, Lafayette is nominated....

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The French Revolution a History Volume One

By: Thomas Carlyle

...auroux, with her band-boxes and rouge-pots, at his side; so that, at every new station, a wooden gallery must be run up between their lodgings. He has... ...f Louis, King by the Grace of God, what sounds are these; muffled ominous, new in our centuries? Boston Harbour is black with unexpected Tea: behold a... ...tte’s music-party in the Park: all Birds of Paradise flying from thee, and musical windpipes growing mute. (Campan, i. 197.) Thou unclean, yet unmalig... ...kil- ful is he, the whole world now looks. Three long years it lasts; with wavering fortune. In fine, after labours compa- rable to the Twelve of Herc... ...ons, it is said, What a spectacle! Now too behold our Deane, our Franklin, American Plenipotentiaries, here in position soliciting; (1777; Deane somew... ...that super-sublime of modesty! Yet, on the whole, our good Saint-Pierre is musical, poetical though most morbid: we will call his Book the swan-song o... ...ow; or even, if refractory, to alight altogether, and kneel: from Madame a wave of her plumes, a smile of her fair face, there where she sits, shall s... ...uzzing in eager expectancy, begins heaping and shaping itself into organic groups. Which or- ganic groups, again, hold smaller organic grouplets: the ... ...ant glances on the Bust of Lafayette, which has stood there ever since the American War of Liberty. Whereupon, by acclamation, Lafayette is nominated....

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The Voyage of the Beagle

By: Charles Darwin

...- ceous fragments of the lower surface of the stream, it is converted into groups of beautifully radiated fibres resembling arragonite. The beds of la... ... glitter in the sun’s rays. They occur only within the limits of the tidal waves; and as the rivulet slowly trickles down, the surf must supply the po... ... such points? — the parent bodies having been distributed by the winds and waves over the immense ocean. But on no other hypothesis can I understand t... ...ofogo Bay — Terrestrial Planariae — Clouds on the Corcovado — Heavy Rain — Musical Frogs — Phosphorescent In- sects — Elater, springing powers of — Bl... ... both are different. When man is the agent in introducing into a country a new species, this relation is often broken: as one instance of this I may m... ...e shall hereafter see) to an analogous conclusion with regard to the South American ostrich, the females of which are parasitical, if I may so express... ...t from their habits. The Saurophagus sulphuratus is typi- cal of the great American tribe of tyrant-flycatchers. In its structure it closely approache... ...found vertical, and traced beneath the sur- face, there were several other groups of fragments, the original sites of which without doubt were near. A... ...lt-lakes are inhabited by small crustaceous animals; and flamingoes (Edin. New Philos. Jour., Jan 1830) likewise frequent them. As these circum- stanc...

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The Awakening and Selected Short Stories

By: Kate Chopin

...ditorials and bits of news which he had not had time to read before quitting New Orleans the day before. Mr. Pontellier wore eye glasses. He was a man... ... there. Meanwhile he held on to his modest position in a mercantile house in New Orleans, where an equal familiarity with English, French and Spanish ... ...tion and her girlhood home in the old Kentucky bluegrass country. She was an American woman, with a small infusion of French which seemed to have been... ... peg outside the door. The hat rested any way on her yellow brown hair, that waved a little, was heavy, and clung close to her head. Madame Ratignolle... ...e won’t look up.” Madame Lebrun flew to the window. She called “Victor!” She waved a handkerchief and called again. The young fellow below got into th... ...self in her selections. Edna was what she herself called very fond of music. Musical strains, well rendered, had a way of evoking pictures in her mind... ... thought much about the sun when it was shining. The people walked in little groups toward the beach. They talked and laughed; some of them sang. Ther... ...of the time I have lost splashing about like a baby!” She would not join the groups in their sports and bouts, but intoxicated with her newly conquere... ... verse ended with “si tu savais.” Robert’s voice was not pretentious. It was musical and true. The voice, the notes, the whole refrain haunted her mem...

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