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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Five

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...- nies to twirl it by steam. Glare is a leading error in the philosophy of American house- hold decoration—an error easily recognised as deduced from ... ...ble flesh!” 16 EA Poe THE SPHINX DURING THE DREAD REIGN of the Cholera in New Y ork, I had accepted the invitation of a relative to spend a fortnight... ... frolics—often enacted among us, at our mas- querades: but here it will be new altogether. Unfortunately, however, it requires a company of eight pers... ...once put into new commotion, and overshadowed by a world of umbrellas. The waver, the jostle, and the hum in- creased in a tenfold degree. For my own ... ...- tween a London populace and that of the most frequented 35 V olume Five American city. A second turn brought us into a square, bril- liantly lighte... ...ong summer hours, The golden light should lie, And thick young herbs and groups of flowers Stand in their beauty by. The oriole should build and t... ...s, Descend along the shore, With bands of noble gentlemen, And banners waved before; And gentle youth and maidens gay, And snowy plumes they wor... ...me, time, In a sort of Runic rhyme, To the tintinnabulation that so musically wells From the bells, bells, bells, bells, Bells, b... ...y dripping, drop by drop, Upon the quiet mountain top. Steals drowsily and musically Into the univeral valley. The rosemary nods upon the grave; The l...

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The $30,000 Bequest : And Other Stories

By: Mark Twain

..................................... .............................. 193 “THE NEW GUIDE OF THE CONVERSATION IN PORTUGUESE AND ENGLISH” ..................... ...For big returns.” “Big. That’s good. Go on, Aleck. What is it?” “Coal. The new mines. Cannel. I mean to put in ten thou sand. Ground floor. When we o... ...ewport, Rhode Is land, Holy Land of High Society, ineffable Domain of the American Aristocracy. As a rule they spent a part of every Sab bath—after ... ...nd in his prosperity. Whenever the billows of adversity and the tumultuous waves of trouble beat high, her smiles subdue their fury. Should the tear o... ... uninterruptedly move forward, shed her silent tears; they mingle with the waves, and take a last farewell of their agitated home, to seek a peace fu... ...cted to have been; however, they still leaned upon their arms in dispersed groups; some were walking the streets, others were talking in the Major’s b... ...always. If I find a learnable phrase that has an imposing look and warbles musically along I do not care to know the meaning of it; I pay it out to th... ...not get any great pleasure out of them, as a rule. Now the trouble with an American paper is that it has no discrimination; it rakes the whole earth f... ... of any thing I can do. I had a very good name for the estate, and it was musical and pretty—GARDEN OF EDEN. Privately, I continue to call it that, b...

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The Poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

By: Samuel Taylor Coleridge

...and. Hast thou foreseen the Storm’s impending rage, When to the Clouds the Waves ambitious rise, And seem with Heaven a doubtful war to wage, Whil... ...u be at this hour from danger free? Perhaps with fearful force some falling Wave Shall wash thee in the wild tempestuous Sea, And in some monster’s... ... my eye ravish’d sweep! May this (I cried) my course through Life portray! New scenes of Wisdom may each step display, And Knowledge open as my day... ... — His Mother’s plate antique had rais’d the sum. Forth leap’d Philedon of new life possest: — ’Twas Brookes’s all till two, — ’twas Hackett’s all ... ...ls in gamesome play, And frisk about, as lamb or kitten gay! Yea! and more musically sweet to me Thy dissonant harsh bray of joy would be, Than wa... ...he hand of Time Flies o’er his mystic lyre: in shadowy dance The alternate groups of Joy and Grief advance Responsive to his varying strains sublim... ...nd with a proud delight Oft will I tell thee, Minstrel of the Moon! ‘‘Most musical, most melancholy’’ Bird! That all thy soft diversities of tone, ... ...oralist prates, ’Tis the keystone and cement of civilized States. Those American Reps! And i’ faith, they were serious! It shock’d us at Paris,...

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Best of Four

By: Carol Ann Ellis

...g Center. Every student needs to find this out as soon as possible. What’s New When we began Best of Four five years ago, it was the intention of the ... ...work approach to teaching. In this case, students work together in smaller groups, sometimes referred to as teams. They then may be required to give p... ...ged and told me to “Get them next time.” Throughout the season, I played a new position—second base. It was difficult because I had to be ready to act... ... the moving escalator to board their flight he and my grandmother turn and wave a final good-bye. As he is going past the window, he sucks in his chee... ... he can and crosses his eyes. This makes him look like Popeye. I laugh and wave a final good-bye. As I am walking past the waiting area, I can still s... ...ities do give the band a impressive image but do not necessarily show real musical talent. T ony Phillips, a VH1 correspondent, writes on their self-t... ... the band wants to show off their clothes and good looks rather than their musical skills, which they have little of anyway. Aidin Vaziri writes on th... ...specially by the teenagers who find joy in murder. This also puts blame on American society because we are the ones who promote these types of movies ... ...known as run-on sentences. Comma spliced sentences occur when two are more groups of words, containing subject and verb parts, which are not subordina...

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Celt and Saxon

By: George Meredith

...o wins a game by playing it without an adversary. Mr. Adister had sprung a new sense in him on the subject of the renunciation of the religion. No tho... ...y assured him that the description of the prince’s lineaments would not be new. It was, as he was aware, derived from a miniature of her husband, tran... ...r. Any- thing that concerns his brother moves him; it is like a touch on a musical instrument. Perhaps I should say a native one.’ ‘Concerns his broth... ...ides of our blood to render the no- blest of us guilty of some unconscious wavering of our loy- 43 George Meredith alty), Patrick dedicated the full-... ...u, sir, for to-morrow I must be off to my brother.’ ‘Take it,’ Mr. Adister waved his hand hastily. He gazed at his idol of untouched eighteen. ‘Keep i... ...acific Islands, but they will soon be snapped up by the European and North American Govern- ments, and a single one of them does not offer space. It w... ...time.’ ‘I have been in America.’ ‘We are not exactly on the pattern of the Americans.’ Philip hinted a bow. He praised the Republican people. ‘Yes, bu... ...ye to-night. Irish or French. Irish are popular. They don’t mind having us musically. And if we’d go on joking to the end we should content them, if o... ...ed to let it be obscured by the paunch of Bull. We have, however, isolated groups, individuals in all classes, by no means delighting in his represent...

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On the Origin of Species

By: Charles Darwin

...nter- mediate varieties in any one formation — On the sudden appearance of groups of species — On their sudden appearance in the lowest known fossilif... ...ical Succession of Organic Beings On the slow and successive appearance of new spe- cies — On their different rates of change — Species once lost do n... ...— On their different rates of change — Species once lost do not reappear — Groups of species fol- low the same general rules in their appearance and d... ... principle of inheritance, any selected variety will tend to propagate its new and modified form. This fundamental subject of Natural Selection will b... ... the Galapagos Archipelago, both one with another, and with those from the American mainland, I was much struck how entirely vague and arbitrary is th... ...all chance. But how false a view is this! Every one has heard that when an American forest is cut down, a very different vegetation springs up; but it... ...- ogy;’ but we now very seldom hear the action, for instance, of the coast-waves, called a trifling and in- significant cause, when applied to the exc... ...nished such views as the excavation of a great valley by a single diluvial wave, so will natu- ral selection, if it be a true principle, banish the be... ...onkeys, fossil Monocanthus Mons, Van, on the origin of fruit-trees Mozart, musical powers of Mud, seeds in Mules, striped Muller, Dr. F., on Alpine Au...

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The Varieties of Religious Experience

By: William James

...Brad- ley—The psychology of character-changes—Emo- tional excitements make new centres of personal en- ergy—Schematic ways of representing this— Starb... ...ted— Characteristics of the faith-state: sense of truth; the world appears new— Sensory and motor automatisms— Permanency of conversions. 7 William J... ... I take my place behind this desk, and face this learned au- dience. To us Americans, the experience of receiving instruction from the living voice, a... ...uous an act. Particularly must this be the case on a soil as sacred to the American imagination as that of Edinburgh. The glories of the philosophic c... ... for which we hunger, and we ride gladly 55 William James on every little wave that promises to bear us towards it.”[19] [19] The New Spirit, p. 232.... ...and around rue. The whole room seemed to me full of God. The air seemed to waver to and fro with the presence of Something I knew not what. I spoke wi... ...not as a moralist, and without a trace of sentimental- ism. He never makes groups and departments of the ills, he never spends time in asking whether ... ...ertain feeling, in what the quality or worth of it consists. One must have musical ears to know the value of a symphony; one must have been in love on... ...w York, 1846, p. 3. 369 William James of light on land and sea, odors and musical sounds, all bring it when the mind is tuned aright. Most of us can ...

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Catherine : A Story

By: William Makepeace Thackeray

... in the mighty River City!— its banks wellnigh overflowing with the myriad-waved Stream of Man! The toppling wains, bearing the produce of a thousand ... ...e congregated the habitations of men. In Tehran, or Pekin, or Stamboul, or New Y ork, or Timbuctoo, or London, there is a certain district where a cer... ...e. “How beautiful they are!” mused Codlingsby, as he surveyed these placid groups calmly taking their pleasure in the sunset. “D’you vant to look at a... ...I can’t do more for you, my lord, than this—I’m busy. Good-by!” And Rafael waved his hand to the peer, and fell to smoking his narghilly. A man with a... ...in piping bullfinches; and a Cardinal in disguise, with a pro- posal for a new loan for the Pope, were heard by turns; and each, after a rapid colloqu... .... I have seen no grandee of V ersailles that has the noble bearing of this American envoy and his suite. They have the refinement of the Old W orld, w... ...ne good service elsewhere than at Quebec,” the King said, appealing to the American Envoy: “at Bunker’s Hill, at Brandywine, at Y ork Island? Now that... ... that there was a person by the name of Blondel, who, in fact, did all the musical part of the King’s performances; and as for the words, when a king ... ...as the evening of the 27th March, 1199, indeed—his Majesty, who was in the musical mood, treated the court with a quantity of his so-called compositio...

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Sartor Resartus the Life and Opinions of Herr Teufelsdr Ockh

By: Thomas Carlyle

... was completed;—thereby, in these his seemingly so aimless rambles, planting new standards, founding new habitable colonies, in the immeasurable circu... ... to him; and then, by quite foreign suggestion. By the arrival, namely, of a new Book from Professor Teufelsdr¨ ockh of Weissnichtwo; treating express... ...lls; so that when a man walks, it is with contin ual jingling. Some few, of musical turn, have a whole chime of bells (Glocken 32 SARTOR RESARTUS s... ...with a Cupid for steersman! Consider their welts, a handbreadth thick, which waver round them by way of hem; the long flood of silver buttons, or rathe... ...hat of practical Reason’ proceeding by large Intuition over whole systematic groups and king doms; whereby, we might say, a noble complexity, almost ... ...ader may imagine. So much we can see; darkly, as through the foliage of some wavering thicket: a youth of no common endowment, who has passed happily ... ...tual hand grips with Destiny herself, may have comported himself among these Musical and Literary dilettanti of both sexes, like a hungry lion invited... ...t as articulately perhaps as the case admitted. Or call him, if you will, an American Backwoodsman, who had to fell unpenetrated forests, and bat tle... ..., considerably involved in haze. To the first English Edition, 1838, which an American, or two American had now opened the way for, there was slighting...

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The Long Vacation

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...ng under the loss of the main pillar of their house, but sending forth the new founders with good hope. Geraldine had made her home at St. Matthew’s w... ...irst summer after their marriage that he was charmed with the vivacity and musical talent of her young sister Angela, now upon the world again. Angela... ...zing how far life is from having its final crisis over at one-and-twenty . New Sisters came in, old ones went to found fresh branches; stricter rules ... ...heeriness, still young-look- ing, though his hair too was scantier and his musical tones subdued; and Geraldine, pensive in eye and lip, but often spa... ...she had seen when she came on him listening to the measured cadence of the waves upon the cliffs, and the reverberations in the hollows beneath. And w... ...been a sheet of mud before had been almost entirely covered with sparkling waves, and there was white foam beat- ing against some of the rocks. “I hop... ...ll, she said, it was not the spirits, but the tobacco, which the Dutch and American sail- ors were glad enough to exchange for her mother’s commodi- t... ... Rockquay with the tobacco-shop. She had cho- sen that place on account of American trading-vessels put- ting in there, as well as those of various fo... ...it of search- ing gaze. He did not speak much, but watched the merry young groups as if they were a sort of comedy in his eyes. They were very merry, ...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Three

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...ry thing, and had speculated very suc- cessfully in stocks of the Edgarton New Bank, as it was for- merly called. By these and other means he had mana... ... eccentric manners—he is well known to almost every person who has visited New Bedford. I stayed at his school until I was sixteen, when I left him fo... ...s- ited these regions, had great weight, apparently, with the muti- neers, wavering, as they were, between half-engendered no- tions of profit and ple... ... the wind issues, and the windward bow of course receives the shock of the waves. In this situa- tion a good vessel will ride out a very heavy gale of... ...was not long after Captain Patten’s visit that Cap- tain Colquhoun, of the American brig Betsey, touched at the largest of the islands for the purpose... ...1, a Captain Haywood, in the Nereus, visited Tristan. He found there three Americans, who were residing upon the island to prepare sealskins and oil. ... ...ity of biche de mer than the oldest seamen among us had ever seen in those groups of the lower latitudes most celebrated for this article of commerce.... ...cid cast of beauty, and the thrilling and enthralling eloquence of her low musical language, made their way into my heart by paces so steadily and ste... ...could no longer bear the touch of her wan fingers, nor the low tone of her musical language, nor the lustre of her melancholy eyes. And she knew all t...

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A Room with a View

By: E. M. Forster

... The better class of tourist was shocked at this, and sympathized with the new-comers. Miss Bartlett, in reply, opened her mouth as little as possible... ...ery interesting, and Lucy hurried over her breakfast, and started with her new friend in high spirits. Italy was coming at last. The Cock- ney Signora... ...r dog, and here and there a priest modestly edging to his Mass through the groups of tourists. But Mr. Emerson was only half interested. He watched th... ...Mr. Beebe was walking up to the Torre del Gallo with the Emersons and some American ladies. Would Miss Bartlett and Miss Honeychurch join the party? C... ...they mix up towns, rivers, palaces in one inextricable whirl. You know the American girl in Punch who says: ‘Say, poppa, what did we see at Rome?’ And... ...radiant joy in her face, he saw the flowers beat against her dress in blue waves. The bushes above them closed. He stepped quickly forward and kissed ... ... Lucy for several years, but only as a commonplace girl who happened to be musical. He could still remember his depression that after- noon at Rome, w... ...will tell you, that our earthly life provides.” It was now time for him to wave his hat at the approaching trio. He did not omit to do so. “She has le... ...ict me. No doubt I am neither artistic nor literary nor intellec- tual nor musical, but I cannot help the drawing-room furniture; your father bought i...

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Winesbur Inesbur, Ohio

By: Sherwood Anderson

...wood Anderson’s small-town “grotesques,” I felt that he was opening for me new depths of experience, touching upon half-buried truths which nothing in... ...n half-buried truths which nothing in my young life had prepared me for. A New York City boy who never saw the crops grow or spent time in the small t... ...artly modeled. Clyde looked, I suppose, not very different from most other American towns, and the few of its resi- dents I tried to engage in talk ab... ...eligious fanaticism and material acquisitiveness can become intertwined in American experience. SHERWOOD ANDERSON was born in Ohio in 1876. His childh... ...s, playing about the tousled heads. As he talked his voice became soft and musical. There was a caress in that also. In a way the voice and the hands,... ... of the bak- ery and presently emerge followed by the baker, who swore and waved his arms about. The baker’s eyes were small and red and his black hai... ... of my refusal will be whispered about. Presently men will get together in groups and talk of it. They will come here. We will quarrel and there will ... ...rown curly hair and grey eyes that were at times hard and direct, at times wavering and uncertain. Not only was he slender but he was also short of st...

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John Keble's Parishes a History of Hursley and Otterbourne

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

... were at work on our chalk, when the lamp-shells rode at anchor on shallow waves, when the cockles sat “at their doors in a rain- bow frill,” and the ... ..., which was dug up by a labourer at Otterbourne, in the course of making a new road. He thought it one of the plates carried on the Roman stan- dards ... ...ng put under forest laws at the time when the district of Ytene became the New Forest. Probably the king was able to ride over down, heather, and wood... ...nd in addition to the sword in his hand there is a metal one, with a blade waved like a Malay crease, by the side of the monument. The inscription is ... ...on of Winchester. He was a 50 John Kemble’s Parishes man of great musical talent, and some of his chants are still in use. The only other fac... ...that had belonged to a widow, named Science Dear, and enlarged it. Several American trees were planted in the ground by Cobbett, of which only one sur... ... scrolls containing corn and grapes, presided over by angels, and with two groups of kneeling figures; on one side, apparently an Emperor with his cro... ...blue, pink, or white in the water-meadows beside the Itchen, deserving the American name of May-wings. Caryophylleae Deptford Pink (Dianthus Armeria)....

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Magnum Bonum or Mother Careys Brood

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

...zel eyes, and a forehead with a look of expansion, partly due to the crisp waves of dark hair being as short as a boy’s. The nose was well cut, and ea... ...n half sorry to leave her dear old school, half glad to go on to something new. She was evidently not so comfortable, while Miss Heath’s lowest teache... ...n’t you know, Skipjack, that’s the reason you don’t grow—” “Eh! What’s the new theory! Who says so, Babie?” came from the bottom of the table. “Nurse ... ... at all,” said Janet. There was a confused outcry of indignation, in which waves—crabs— boats and shrimps, were all mingled together, “I’m sure that’s... ...ou model, Carey?” Mary asked, and Allen volun- teered to show his mother’s groups and bas-reliefs, thereby much increasing the litter on the floor, an... ...me coloured, and white, flowering trees. “They said they would show me the Americans,” she said. “Why was it, mother? I thought Americans were like th... ...es, and a pond, and statues standing round it, and I don’t think they were Americans, for I know one was Diana, because she had a bow and quiver. I wa... ...companied by Nita Ray with her inseparable Janet, meaning to study village groups and rustic sports. The other ladies walked in the cool to meet them ... ...fternoon service, Sydney waited to exer- cise her choir once more in their musical duties; but Babie, hearing there was to be no rehearsal of the flow...

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A Woman of Thirty

By: Honoré de Balzac

... from his eyes, they broke and gathered again, surging to and fro like the waves in a bay, or again swept before him like the long ridges of high-cres... ...s in a bay, or again swept before him like the long ridges of high-crested wave which the vexed Ocean directs against the shore. When the manoeuvres w... ...e sails came out here and there from among the islands in the Loire to add new grace to the perfect view. The subtle scent of the willows by the water... ...ill better, their laughter comes more readily for an old memory than for a new jest—the present intrudes upon them. When an old waiting-woman announce... ...t. But at the beginning of the second part she glanced over the glistening groups and saw— Arthur. He never took his eyes from her face. A quick shud-... ...the stranger’s eyes flashed out on him again; and when he spoke, it was in musical tones with no sign of the previous guttural convulsion, though his ... ...wo hours are almost over,” he said, in a voice that was strangely calm and musical. “You here!” cried the General. “By what means—?” and he gave wife ... ...s of him; but a few days before Spain recog- nized the independence of the American Republics, he wrote that he was coming home. 141 Balzac So, one f... ...rcelain vases painted by Madame Jacotot; tiny South 150 A Woman of Thirty American birds, like living rubies, sapphires, and gold, hov- ered among th...

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The Magician a Novel

By: Somerset Maugham

... him almost against his will. ‘The first time I saw her I felt as though a new world had opened to my ken.’ The divine music of Keats’s lines rang thr... ... ness. It was almost with maternal pride that she watched each year add a new grace to that exceeding beauty. But her common sense was sound, and she... ...ingly neat. She had good hands, very white and admirably formed, which she waved con tinually in the fervour of her gesticulation. Now that her means... ...anged in a horse shoe, which was reserved for a small party of English or American painters and a few Frenchmen with their wives. At least, they were... ...s, who painted still life with a certain amount of skill, and Clayson, the American sculptor. Raggles stood for rank and fashion at the Chien Noir. He... ...in the room broke into exclamations at this extravagance, but Oliver Haddo waved his fat hand. ‘I shall start with the ice, O Marie, to cool the passi... ...turn of the Pagan world, the sins of the Borgias.’ His voice, poignant and musical, blended with the suave music of the words so that Margaret felt sh... ...f any importance,’ she laughed. Presently the diners began to go in little groups, and Mar garet suggested that they should saunter towards the Madel...

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Democracy and Education

By: John Dewey

...ion we speak of the life of a savage tribe, of the Athenian people, of the American nation. “Life” covers customs, institutions, beliefs, victories an... ...ne hand, there 7 John Dewey is the contrast between the immaturity of the new-born members of the group —its future sole representatives— and the mat... ...bers who com- pose a society lived on continuously, they might educate the new-born members, but it would be a task directed by personal interest rath... ...nd of education—that of direct tuition or schooling. In undeveloped social groups, we find very little formal teaching and training. Savage groups mai... .... What is strange or foreign (that is to say outside the activities of the groups) tends to be morally forbidden and intellectually suspect. It seems ... ...e members of any group while it is isolated. The assimilative force of the American public school is eloquent testimony to the effi- cacy of the commo... ...ean- ingless transition unless it is consciously connected with the return wave of consequences which flow from it. When an activity is continued into... ...e action of the piano directed to accomplish the purpose of the piano as a musical instrument. It is the same with “pedagogical” method. The only diff... ...ano may produce, and the variations in technique required in the different musical results secured. Method in any case is but an effective way of empl...

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The Longest Journey

By: E. M. Forster

...in it. The pictures were not attrac- tive, nor did they attract her—school groups, Watts’ “Sir Percival,” a dog running after a rabbit, a man running ... ..., so don’t be so chilly and cautious. I’ve just realized, looking at those groups, that you must have been at school together. Did you come much acros... ...s rather careful when he drove up to the fa- cade of his shop. “I like our new lettering,” he said thoughtfully. The words “Stewart Ansell” were repea... ...cker blue.” 36 The Longest Journey “Rather! He’s secretary to the college musical soci- ety.” “A. P. Carruthers?” “Yes.” Mr. Dawes seemed offended. H... ...to-date were said to be combined. The school doubled its numbers. It built new class-rooms, laboratories and a gymna- sium. It dropped the prefix “Gra... ... slanged the proprietor and ragged the pretty girls; while Rickie, as each wave of vulgarity burst over him, sunk his head lower and lower, and wished... ...man road along by the straw sacks. His impulse was to retreat, but someone waved to him. It was Agnes. She waved continually, as much as to say, “Wait... ...e of criticism is quite a thing of the past. Have you seen the illustrated American edition?” “I don’t remember.” “Might I send you a copy? I think yo...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume One

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...ting place of Edgar Allan Poe, the most interesting and original figure in American letters. And, to sig- nify that peculiar musical quality of Poe’s ... ...g and original figure in American letters. And, to sig- nify that peculiar musical quality of Poe’s genius which inthralls every reader, Mr. Lowell su... ...s unmortified sense of independence.” And this was the tribute paid by the American public to the master who had given to it such tales of conjuring c... ...other and sister, the remaining children, were cared for by others. In his new home Edgar found all the luxury and advantages money could provide. He ... ...cted with various newspapers and magazines in Richmond, Phila- delphia and New Y ork. He was faithful, punctual, industrious, thorough. N. P . Willis,... ...roper relation of parts, and to draw a correct outline, while the sec- ond groups, fills up and colors. Both of these Mr. Poe has displayed with singu... ...here they fell, but sunk slowly and steadily down, and commingled with the waves, while from the trunks of the trees other shadows were continually co... ...ip of, perhaps, four thousand tons. Although upreared upon the summit of a wave more than a hundred times her own altitude, her apparent size exceeded...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Two

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...y confusedly, some miscellaneous letters and other papers, with one or two musical instruments and a few books. Here, however, after a long and very d... ..., even in Europe; and which has never been quoted, to my knowledge, by any American — if we except, perhaps, the author of the “Curiosities of America... ...he sea. It came toward us with inconceivable swift- ness, throwing up huge waves of foam around its breast, and illuminating all that part of the sea ... ... of Salem, Mass., presented the “Na- tional Institute” with an insect from New Zealand, with the following description: “ ‘The Hotte,a decided caterpi... ...y increasing sound, like the moan- ing of a vast herd of buffaloes upon an American prairie; and at the same moment I perceived that what seamen term ... ...tices among the Ferroe islands, “have no other cause than the collision of waves rising and falling, at flux and reflux, against a ridge of rocks and ... ...oam. The boat made a sharp half turn to larboard, and then shot off in its new direction like a thunderbolt. At the same moment the roaring noise of t... ...haps even more than to the orthodox and easily recognisable beau- ties, of musical science. I had learned, too, the very remark- able fact, that the s... ...elieved by occasional trees of gigantic height, growing singly or in small groups, both along the plateau and in the domain behind the wall, but in cl...

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Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...d has at the moment of restoration literally the force and liveliness of a new birth—the very same pang, and no whit feebler, as that which belonged t... ...o sudden life on our first awaking, and is to all in- tents and purposes a new and not an old affliction—one which brings with it the old original sho... ...after so long a voyage, she only, out of the total crew, was thrown on the American shore, with one hundred and five pounds in her purse of clear gain... ...foot of Kate’s little account. But unhappily for Kate’s début on this vast American stage, the case was otherwise. Mr. Urquiza had the misfortune (equ... ...to the morning air. Kate had now no time to send back her compliments in a musical halloo. The Alcalde missed break- ing his neck on this occasion ver... ... man. We have all heard of a king that, sitting on the sea-shore, bade the waves, as they began to lave his feet, upon their allegiance to retire. Tha... ...y which was to be. 3. The diffusive love, not such as rises and falls upon waves of life and mortality, not such as sinks and swells by undulations of... ...ch- ess on being hailed as Dauphiness, was a succession of the most tragic groups from the most awful section of the Gre- cian theatre. The next allia... ...ble expression of national ven- eration to the deceased, there was a grand musical service, most admirably performed, at the close of which Kant’s mor...

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Autobiography Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life

By: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

...g deeply in all the influences of his age, he has from the first, at every new ep- och, stood forth to elucidate the new circumstances of the time; to... ...portions widely different in character: the products of the first, once so new and original, have long either directly or through the thou- sand thous... ...ds of a master, compels a language which is as rich as Greek to be also as musical. The spring of 1773, which witnessed the publication of Götz, saw h... ...cene in Auerbach’s cellar. Egmont was also begun under the stimulus of the American Rebel- lion. A way of escaping from his embarrassments was unex- p... ... German house, which unhappily came to pass, as after his death the choice wavered only between the king of Spain (afterwards), Charles V ., and the k... ...art. Seven years he serves for his beloved, without impatience and without wavering. His father-in-law, crafty like himself, and disposed, like him, t... ...Huguenots, who settled there after the revocation of the edict of Nantes.— American Note. 235 Goethe me. Her ill health kept her constantly at home. ... ...e: and a man in a light jerkin was passing between the two above-mentioned groups, and, without troubling himself about them, directly up to the templ... ... on both the piano and the violin. The second, a true, good soul, likewise musical, enlivened the concerts which were often got up, no less than his e...

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The Brothers Karamazov

By: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky

...ur sorrow ,” scoff- ers said to him. Many even added that he was glad of a new comic part in which to play the buffoon, and that it was simply to make... ...d always hated his first mistress, Adelaida Ivanovna, took the side of his new mistress. He championed her cause, abus- ing Fyodor Pavlovitch in a man... ... eyes. The latter turned round, and noticing that Miusov was watching him, waved him a kiss. “Well, are you coming to the Superior?” Miusov asked Ivan... ...He used to dress up in a sheet as though it were a surplice, and sang, and waved some object over the dead cat as though it were a censer. All this he... ...d of Grushenka in a sort of rapture. She held out her hand with a charming musical, nervous little laugh, watched the “sweet young lady,” and obviousl... ... turned away, wringing his hands. Grushenka ran out of the house, laughing musically. Katerina Ivanovna went into a fit of hysterics. She sobbed, ... ... the witnesses for the defence and for the prosecution were separated into groups by the President, and whether it was arranged to call them in a cert... ..., already. Even though Grusha will be with me. Just look at her; is she an American? She is Russian, Russian to the marrow of her bones; she will be h... ...s soon as we’ve learnt it—good-bye to America! We’ll run here to Russia as American citizens. Don’t be uneasy—we would not 722 THE BROTHERS KARAMAZO...

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The Clever Woman of the Family

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

... popularity. It was the family fashion to look down from their crag at the new esplanade with pity and contempt for the ruined loneliness of the peb- ... ...her of being protected. She had a few alarms as to the results of Rachel’s new immunities of age, and though never questioning the wisdom of her cleve... ... not habitual with her, and there was about her a look as if some terrible wave of grief or suffering had swept over her ere yet the features were ful... ...ung.” “Fourteen. I was in a naughty fit at her refusing to go to the great musical meeting with us. We always used to go to stay at one of the canon’s... ...ice, and the prime labour of his life was to work up his choir; but he was musical by educa- tion rather than nature, and having begun his career with... ... always held to what she thought right, and did not conceive that it would waver. The acquiescence in his visits, and the undis- guised exultant pleas... ...ossible to read, also the neat writing and thin wavy water-marked paper of American professors and phi- lanthropists in high commendation of his abili... ... famished and weary state of expectation, the good Dean gyrating among the groups, trying to make conversation, which every one felt too fretful and t... ...hing at the freaks of the scamper- 448 The Clever Woman of the Family ing groups of children, gaily exchanging pleasant talk with one friend after an...

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Getting Married and Preface to Getting Married

By: George Bernard Shaw

...VIII. procured his divorce from Katharine of Arragon to the pleas on which American wives obtain divorces (for instance, “mental anguish” caused by th... ... is there in marriage that makes the thoughtful people so uncomfortable? A NEW ATTACK ON MARRIAGE The answer to this question is an answer which every... ...- fashioned newspapers with effort, and were just taking with avidity to a new sort of paper, costing a halfpenny, which they believed to be extraordi... ...hich they called education; and of keeping pianos in their houses, not for musical purposes, but to torment their daugh- ters with a senseless stupidi... ...he street traffic to be or to know any better than the people who obey the wave of his hand. All concerted action involves subordi- nation and the app... ...h parties as in Sweden, not to mention the experiments made by some of the American States, would have shaken society to its foundations. Yet they hav... ...e repeated here that no law, however stringent, can prevent polygamy among groups of people who choose to live loosely and be monogamous only in appea... ... out now. Mrs Collins knows. MRS GEORGE [a faint convulsion passing like a wave over her] I know more than either of you. One of you has not yet exhau...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Four

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...he Nopolis Tea-Pot’—as nearly as I can recollect, this was the name of the new paper. The leading article, I must admit, was brilliant—not to say seve... ...alighted like a bombshell among the hitherto peaceful citizens of Nopolis. Groups of excited individuals gathered at the corners of the streets. Every... ...ent to his lately-ac- quired charger —an attachment which seemed to attain new strength from every fresh example of the animal’s ferocious and demon-l... ...- dications of refined taste, many books, drawings, pots of flow- ers, and musical instruments. A cheerful fire blazed upon the hearth. At a piano, si... ...en I say that it bore resemblance to the fervid, chanting, monotonous, yet musical sermonic manner of Coleridge), I perceived symp- toms of even more ... ...ously laid by itself “solitary and alone” (excuse me for quoting the great American poet Benton!), as a guarantee of the magnani- mous intention. We a... ...it. The truth is, I labored under the disadvantage of having no monkey—and American streets are so muddy, and a Democratic rabble is so obstrusive, an... ...former situation, assumes the next move himself. Upon beating the game, he waves his head with an air of triumph, looks round compla- cently upon the ... ...le not now with such thoughts. To-morrow we will speak of this. Y our mind wavers, and its agitation will find relief in the exercise of simple memori...

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Resurrection

By: Mrs. Louis Maude

...of the cow. The young woman was lying in the cowshed with a fine, healthy, new-born baby. The old maiden lady scolded the maids again for allowing the... ...e court, gentlemen,” said the usher, pointing to the door, with an amiable wave of his hand. All moved towards the door, pausing to let each other pas... ... the stomach, and, according to his doctor’s advice, he had begun trying a new treatment, and this had kept him at home longer than usual. Now, as he ... ...broken in and fed by others. There, with other men like himself, he had to wave a sword, shoot off guns, and teach others to do the same. He had no ot... ... Well, our guessing was no use. The Lord willed otherwise,” she went on in musical tones. “Is it possible? Have they sentenced you?” asked Theodosia, ... ...ar artists.” “Yes, that’s so,” said the watchman’s wife, and ran on in her musical strain, “they’re like flies after sugar.” “And here, too,” Maslova ... ...veral jailers. In the next room sat about twenty persons, men and women in groups and in pairs, talking in low voices. There was a writing table by th... ...nd this is a thing not only we but many have been considering. There is an American, Henry George. This is what he has thought out, and I agree with h... ...lova’s would shape if she were acquitted. He remembered the thought of the American writer, Thoreau, who at the time when slavery existed in America s...

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The Analysis of Mind

By: Bertrand Russell

...ight be secured. It was believed also that from writers mainly British and American fuller consideration of English Philosophy than it had hith- erto ... ...dley, Stout, Bertrand Russell, Baldwin, Urban, Montague, and others, and a new interest in foreign works, German, French and Italian, which had either... ...nti-materialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the “stuff” of the world is neith... ...ialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the “stuff” of the world is neither mental... ...pot, my heart first stops, then palpitates, and my legs respond to the air-waves falling on my tympanum by quickening their movements. If I stumble as... ...all the “stuff” of the mind, and that everything else can be analysed into groups of sensations related in various ways, or characteristics of sensa- ... ...nsations related in various ways, or characteristics of sensa- tions or of groups of sensations. As regards belief, I shall give grounds for this view... ...say a second. Then, according to physics, what happens is that a spherical wave of light travels outward from the star through space, just as, when yo... ... learn to understand a concept as we learn to walk, dance, fence or play a musical instrument: it is a habit, i.e. an organized memory. General terms ...

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Evan Harrington

By: George Meredith

...r Jacko, and comfort him till I come back.’ Jacko was a middle-sized South American monkey, and had been a pet of her husband’s. He was supposed to be... ...g children, and wrote frequently; but of course they had to consider their new position, and their husbands, and their husbands’ families, and the wor... ...riet—’ Mr. Andrew hesitated, and branched off: ‘You ‘ve heard we ‘ve got a new baby?’ Evan congratulated him; but another inquiry was in Mr. Andrew’s ... ...rs, as he inquired: ‘What’s the trade? he don’t say.’ Andrew added, with a wave of the hand: ‘Out of a sort of feeling for his sisters—I like him for ... ...se to guarantee his sin- cerity with an offer of pledgemoney. The waggoner waved it aside. He wanted no money, he said. ‘Look heer,’ he went on; ‘if y... ...ey Court. The Countess smiled, and in the few paces that separated the two groups, whispered to her brother: ‘Miss Jocelyn, my dear.’ The eye-glasses ... ...it for any other.’ ‘What do you mean?’ said Evan, thinking more of the un- musical laugh than of the words. He received no explanation, and the irksom... ... on a hump in the middle of the mound which defied the dance. Watteau-like groups were already couched in the shade. There were ladies of all sorts: t... ...ally dragged in her wake. ‘ Another dowager and fogy!’ cried the Countess, musically. ‘Do you not dance, my child?’ ‘Not till the music strikes up,’ r...

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