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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Two

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...y confusedly, some miscellaneous letters and other papers, with one or two musical instruments and a few books. Here, however, after a long and very d... ..., even in Europe; and which has never been quoted, to my knowledge, by any American — if we except, perhaps, the author of the “Curiosities of America... ...he sea. It came toward us with inconceivable swift- ness, throwing up huge waves of foam around its breast, and illuminating all that part of the sea ... ... of Salem, Mass., presented the “Na- tional Institute” with an insect from New Zealand, with the following description: “ ‘The Hotte,a decided caterpi... ...y increasing sound, like the moan- ing of a vast herd of buffaloes upon an American prairie; and at the same moment I perceived that what seamen term ... ...tices among the Ferroe islands, “have no other cause than the collision of waves rising and falling, at flux and reflux, against a ridge of rocks and ... ...oam. The boat made a sharp half turn to larboard, and then shot off in its new direction like a thunderbolt. At the same moment the roaring noise of t... ...haps even more than to the orthodox and easily recognisable beau- ties, of musical science. I had learned, too, the very remark- able fact, that the s... ...elieved by occasional trees of gigantic height, growing singly or in small groups, both along the plateau and in the domain behind the wall, but in cl...

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Narrative and Miscellaneous Papers

By: Thomas de Quincey

...d has at the moment of restoration literally the force and liveliness of a new birth—the very same pang, and no whit feebler, as that which belonged t... ...o sudden life on our first awaking, and is to all in- tents and purposes a new and not an old affliction—one which brings with it the old original sho... ...after so long a voyage, she only, out of the total crew, was thrown on the American shore, with one hundred and five pounds in her purse of clear gain... ...foot of Kate’s little account. But unhappily for Kate’s début on this vast American stage, the case was otherwise. Mr. Urquiza had the misfortune (equ... ...to the morning air. Kate had now no time to send back her compliments in a musical halloo. The Alcalde missed break- ing his neck on this occasion ver... ... man. We have all heard of a king that, sitting on the sea-shore, bade the waves, as they began to lave his feet, upon their allegiance to retire. Tha... ...y which was to be. 3. The diffusive love, not such as rises and falls upon waves of life and mortality, not such as sinks and swells by undulations of... ...ch- ess on being hailed as Dauphiness, was a succession of the most tragic groups from the most awful section of the Gre- cian theatre. The next allia... ...ble expression of national ven- eration to the deceased, there was a grand musical service, most admirably performed, at the close of which Kant’s mor...

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Autobiography Truth and Fiction Relating to My Life

By: Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe

...g deeply in all the influences of his age, he has from the first, at every new ep- och, stood forth to elucidate the new circumstances of the time; to... ...portions widely different in character: the products of the first, once so new and original, have long either directly or through the thou- sand thous... ...ds of a master, compels a language which is as rich as Greek to be also as musical. The spring of 1773, which witnessed the publication of Götz, saw h... ...cene in Auerbach’s cellar. Egmont was also begun under the stimulus of the American Rebel- lion. A way of escaping from his embarrassments was unex- p... ... German house, which unhappily came to pass, as after his death the choice wavered only between the king of Spain (afterwards), Charles V ., and the k... ...art. Seven years he serves for his beloved, without impatience and without wavering. His father-in-law, crafty like himself, and disposed, like him, t... ...Huguenots, who settled there after the revocation of the edict of Nantes.— American Note. 235 Goethe me. Her ill health kept her constantly at home. ... ...e: and a man in a light jerkin was passing between the two above-mentioned groups, and, without troubling himself about them, directly up to the templ... ... on both the piano and the violin. The second, a true, good soul, likewise musical, enlivened the concerts which were often got up, no less than his e...

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The Brothers Karamazov

By: Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky

...ur sorrow ,” scoff- ers said to him. Many even added that he was glad of a new comic part in which to play the buffoon, and that it was simply to make... ...d always hated his first mistress, Adelaida Ivanovna, took the side of his new mistress. He championed her cause, abus- ing Fyodor Pavlovitch in a man... ... eyes. The latter turned round, and noticing that Miusov was watching him, waved him a kiss. “Well, are you coming to the Superior?” Miusov asked Ivan... ...He used to dress up in a sheet as though it were a surplice, and sang, and waved some object over the dead cat as though it were a censer. All this he... ...d of Grushenka in a sort of rapture. She held out her hand with a charming musical, nervous little laugh, watched the “sweet young lady,” and obviousl... ... turned away, wringing his hands. Grushenka ran out of the house, laughing musically. Katerina Ivanovna went into a fit of hysterics. She sobbed, ... ... the witnesses for the defence and for the prosecution were separated into groups by the President, and whether it was arranged to call them in a cert... ..., already. Even though Grusha will be with me. Just look at her; is she an American? She is Russian, Russian to the marrow of her bones; she will be h... ...s soon as we’ve learnt it—good-bye to America! We’ll run here to Russia as American citizens. Don’t be uneasy—we would not 722 THE BROTHERS KARAMAZO...

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The Clever Woman of the Family

By: Charlotte Mary Yonge

... popularity. It was the family fashion to look down from their crag at the new esplanade with pity and contempt for the ruined loneliness of the peb- ... ...her of being protected. She had a few alarms as to the results of Rachel’s new immunities of age, and though never questioning the wisdom of her cleve... ... not habitual with her, and there was about her a look as if some terrible wave of grief or suffering had swept over her ere yet the features were ful... ...ung.” “Fourteen. I was in a naughty fit at her refusing to go to the great musical meeting with us. We always used to go to stay at one of the canon’s... ...ice, and the prime labour of his life was to work up his choir; but he was musical by educa- tion rather than nature, and having begun his career with... ... always held to what she thought right, and did not conceive that it would waver. The acquiescence in his visits, and the undis- guised exultant pleas... ...ossible to read, also the neat writing and thin wavy water-marked paper of American professors and phi- lanthropists in high commendation of his abili... ... famished and weary state of expectation, the good Dean gyrating among the groups, trying to make conversation, which every one felt too fretful and t... ...hing at the freaks of the scamper- 448 The Clever Woman of the Family ing groups of children, gaily exchanging pleasant talk with one friend after an...

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Getting Married and Preface to Getting Married

By: George Bernard Shaw

...VIII. procured his divorce from Katharine of Arragon to the pleas on which American wives obtain divorces (for instance, “mental anguish” caused by th... ... is there in marriage that makes the thoughtful people so uncomfortable? A NEW ATTACK ON MARRIAGE The answer to this question is an answer which every... ...- fashioned newspapers with effort, and were just taking with avidity to a new sort of paper, costing a halfpenny, which they believed to be extraordi... ...hich they called education; and of keeping pianos in their houses, not for musical purposes, but to torment their daugh- ters with a senseless stupidi... ...he street traffic to be or to know any better than the people who obey the wave of his hand. All concerted action involves subordi- nation and the app... ...h parties as in Sweden, not to mention the experiments made by some of the American States, would have shaken society to its foundations. Yet they hav... ...e repeated here that no law, however stringent, can prevent polygamy among groups of people who choose to live loosely and be monogamous only in appea... ... out now. Mrs Collins knows. MRS GEORGE [a faint convulsion passing like a wave over her] I know more than either of you. One of you has not yet exhau...

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The Works of Edgar Allan Poe in Five Volumes Volume Four

By: Edgar Allan Poe

...he Nopolis Tea-Pot’—as nearly as I can recollect, this was the name of the new paper. The leading article, I must admit, was brilliant—not to say seve... ...alighted like a bombshell among the hitherto peaceful citizens of Nopolis. Groups of excited individuals gathered at the corners of the streets. Every... ...ent to his lately-ac- quired charger —an attachment which seemed to attain new strength from every fresh example of the animal’s ferocious and demon-l... ...- dications of refined taste, many books, drawings, pots of flow- ers, and musical instruments. A cheerful fire blazed upon the hearth. At a piano, si... ...en I say that it bore resemblance to the fervid, chanting, monotonous, yet musical sermonic manner of Coleridge), I perceived symp- toms of even more ... ...ously laid by itself “solitary and alone” (excuse me for quoting the great American poet Benton!), as a guarantee of the magnani- mous intention. We a... ...it. The truth is, I labored under the disadvantage of having no monkey—and American streets are so muddy, and a Democratic rabble is so obstrusive, an... ...former situation, assumes the next move himself. Upon beating the game, he waves his head with an air of triumph, looks round compla- cently upon the ... ...le not now with such thoughts. To-morrow we will speak of this. Y our mind wavers, and its agitation will find relief in the exercise of simple memori...

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Resurrection

By: Mrs. Louis Maude

...of the cow. The young woman was lying in the cowshed with a fine, healthy, new-born baby. The old maiden lady scolded the maids again for allowing the... ...e court, gentlemen,” said the usher, pointing to the door, with an amiable wave of his hand. All moved towards the door, pausing to let each other pas... ... the stomach, and, according to his doctor’s advice, he had begun trying a new treatment, and this had kept him at home longer than usual. Now, as he ... ...broken in and fed by others. There, with other men like himself, he had to wave a sword, shoot off guns, and teach others to do the same. He had no ot... ... Well, our guessing was no use. The Lord willed otherwise,” she went on in musical tones. “Is it possible? Have they sentenced you?” asked Theodosia, ... ...ar artists.” “Yes, that’s so,” said the watchman’s wife, and ran on in her musical strain, “they’re like flies after sugar.” “And here, too,” Maslova ... ...veral jailers. In the next room sat about twenty persons, men and women in groups and in pairs, talking in low voices. There was a writing table by th... ...nd this is a thing not only we but many have been considering. There is an American, Henry George. This is what he has thought out, and I agree with h... ...lova’s would shape if she were acquitted. He remembered the thought of the American writer, Thoreau, who at the time when slavery existed in America s...

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The Analysis of Mind

By: Bertrand Russell

...ight be secured. It was believed also that from writers mainly British and American fuller consideration of English Philosophy than it had hith- erto ... ...dley, Stout, Bertrand Russell, Baldwin, Urban, Montague, and others, and a new interest in foreign works, German, French and Italian, which had either... ...nti-materialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the “stuff” of the world is neith... ...ialistic tendency of physics is the view of William James and the American new realists, according to which the “stuff” of the world is neither mental... ...pot, my heart first stops, then palpitates, and my legs respond to the air-waves falling on my tympanum by quickening their movements. If I stumble as... ...all the “stuff” of the mind, and that everything else can be analysed into groups of sensations related in various ways, or characteristics of sensa- ... ...nsations related in various ways, or characteristics of sensa- tions or of groups of sensations. As regards belief, I shall give grounds for this view... ...say a second. Then, according to physics, what happens is that a spherical wave of light travels outward from the star through space, just as, when yo... ... learn to understand a concept as we learn to walk, dance, fence or play a musical instrument: it is a habit, i.e. an organized memory. General terms ...

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Evan Harrington

By: George Meredith

...r Jacko, and comfort him till I come back.’ Jacko was a middle-sized South American monkey, and had been a pet of her husband’s. He was supposed to be... ...g children, and wrote frequently; but of course they had to consider their new position, and their husbands, and their husbands’ families, and the wor... ...riet—’ Mr. Andrew hesitated, and branched off: ‘You ‘ve heard we ‘ve got a new baby?’ Evan congratulated him; but another inquiry was in Mr. Andrew’s ... ...rs, as he inquired: ‘What’s the trade? he don’t say.’ Andrew added, with a wave of the hand: ‘Out of a sort of feeling for his sisters—I like him for ... ...se to guarantee his sin- cerity with an offer of pledgemoney. The waggoner waved it aside. He wanted no money, he said. ‘Look heer,’ he went on; ‘if y... ...ey Court. The Countess smiled, and in the few paces that separated the two groups, whispered to her brother: ‘Miss Jocelyn, my dear.’ The eye-glasses ... ...it for any other.’ ‘What do you mean?’ said Evan, thinking more of the un- musical laugh than of the words. He received no explanation, and the irksom... ... on a hump in the middle of the mound which defied the dance. Watteau-like groups were already couched in the shade. There were ladies of all sorts: t... ...ally dragged in her wake. ‘ Another dowager and fogy!’ cried the Countess, musically. ‘Do you not dance, my child?’ ‘Not till the music strikes up,’ r...

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