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Prosper Ménière

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Title: Prosper Ménière  
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Subject: Ménière's disease, 1861 in science, 1862 in science, 1799 in science, 1799
Collection: 1799 Births, 1862 Deaths, 19Th-Century French Physicians, French Scientists, People from Angers
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Prosper Ménière

Prosper Ménière
Born (1799-06-18)June 18, 1799
Angers, France
Died February 7, 1862(1862-02-07) (aged 62)
Paris, France
Residence Georgia
Nationality France
Fields Medicine
Known for Ménière's disease

Prosper Ménière (18 June 1799 – 7 February 1862) was born in Angers, France. He was lycée- and university-educated and he excelled at humanities and classics. He completed his gold medal in medical studies at Hôtel-Dieu de Paris in 1826, and his M.D. in 1828. He then assisted Guillaume Dupuytren.

Ménière was originally set to be an assistant professor in faculty, but political tensions disturbed his professorship and he was sent to control the spread of cholera. He received a legion of honor for his work, but never gained professorship. After securing the position of physician-in-chief at the Institute for deaf-mutes, he focused on the diseases of the ear.[1][2]

Ménière's studies at the deaf-mute institute helped formulate his paper, On a particular kind of hearing loss resulting from lesions of the inner ear which ultimately led to the recognition of Ménière's disease.[3]

There is debate as to how Ménière's name is spelled. Prosper himself was known to write his name as "Menière" while his son used the spelling "Ménière." Many people omit the accent marks.[4]

Notes

  1. ^ Birch, A (1974). "Ménière's disease". The Practitioner 213 (1275): 391–392.  
  2. ^ "Editorial". Journal of the American Medical Association 207 (9): 1708. 1969.  
  3. ^ Haybach, P. J. (1998). Meniere's Disease: What You Need to Know. Portland, OR: Vestibular Disorders Association. p. 7.  
  4. ^ Haybach, P. J. (1998). Meniere's Disease: What You Need to Know. Portland, OR: Vestibular Disorders Association. p. 9.  

References

  1. Beasley; Jones (December 1996). "Meniere's disease: Evolution of a definition". The Journal of Laryngology and Otology 110 (12): 1108.  

External links

  • Prosper Ménière Society Official website
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