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Pegaeae

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Pegaeae

In Greek mythology, the Pegaeae (; Πηγαῖαι) were a type of naiad that lived in springs. They were often considered great uncles of the river gods (Potamoi), thus establishing a mythological relationship between a river itself and its springs.

The number of Pegaeae included but was not limited to:[1]

  1. Albunea (Roman mythology)
  2. Alexirhoe, daughter of the river god Grenikos[2][3]
  3. The Anigrides (daughters of the river god Anigros, were believed to cure skin diseases)[4][5][6]
  4. Archidemia[7]
  5. Arethusa[8][9][10][11]
  6. Castalia, or Cassotis[12][13]
  7. Comaetho, daughter or wife of the river god Cydnus[14]
  8. The Corycian Nymphs (Coryceia, Cleodora, Daphnis, Melaina)
  9. Cyane
  10. The Cyrtonian nymphs (local springs in the town of Cyrtones, Boeotia)[15][16]
  11. The Deliades (daughters of Inopus, god of the river Inopus on the island of Delos)[17][18]
  12. Dirce, transformed into a spring (presumably into a nymph personifying it) after her death
  13. Gargaphie, or Plataia (one of the daughters of the river god Asopus)[19]
  14. Hagno, one of the nurses of infant Zeus
  15. The Himerian Naiads[20][21]
  16. The Inachides (daughters of the river god Inachus, namely Io, Amymone,[22] Philodice,[23] Messeis and Hyperia)[24][25][26]
  17. The Ionides (Calliphaea, Iasis, Pegaea and Synallaxis)[27]
  18. Ismene[28][29]
  19. The Ithacian nymphs (dwelled in sacred caves on Ithaca)[30]
  20. Langia[31]
  21. The Leibethrides (individual names include Libethrias and Petra)[32][33]
  22. Magea[7]
  23. Milichie[7]
  24. Metope (wife of Asopus)
  25. The Mysian Naiads (Euneica, Malis and Nycheia[34]), who dwelled in the spring of Pegae near the lake Askanios in Bithynia and were responsible for the kidnapping of Hylas[35][36]
  26. The Ortygian nymphs (local springs of Syracuse, Sicily)[37][38]
  27. Pegasis, daughter of the river god Grenikos[39]
  28. Peirene
  29. Pharmaceia, nymph of a poisonous spring in Attika and Orithyia's playmate[40][41]
  30. Psanis (a local spring in Arcadia)
  31. The Rhyndacides (daughters of the river god Rhyndacus)[42]
  32. Salmacis
  33. The Spercheides (daughters of the river god Spercheus)
  34. Strophia (a spring on Mount Cithaeron near Thebes; barely personified)[43][44]
  35. Telphousa
  36. Temenitis[7]

References

  1. ^ Theoi Project - List of Nymphs and types of Nymphs
  2. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses 11. 762 ff
  3. ^ Theoi Project - Alexirhoe
  4. ^ Strabo, Geography 8.3.19
  5. ^ Pausanias, Guide to Greece 5.5.11
  6. ^ Theoi Project - Anigrides
  7. ^ a b c d Pliny the Elder, Natural History 3. 89, in a list of Sicilan springs, of which only Arethousa and Cyane are known to have been personified
  8. ^ Strabo, Geography 6. 2. 4
  9. ^ Ovid, Metamorphoses 5. 407 & 487 ff
  10. ^ Virgil, Aeneid 3. 694 ff
  11. ^ Theoi Project - Arethousa
  12. ^ Pausanias, Guide to Greece 10.8.9; 10.24.7
  13. ^ Theoi Project - Castalia
  14. ^ Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 2. 143-144 & 40 141-143
  15. ^ Pausanias, Guide to Greece 9.24.4
  16. ^ Theoi Project - Nymphai Kyrtoniai
  17. ^ Callimachus, Hymn IV to Delos, 252
  18. ^ Theoi Project - Deliades
  19. ^ Theoi Project - Plataia
  20. ^ Pindar, Odes Olympian, 12
  21. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History, 5. 5. 1
  22. ^ Theoi Project - Amymone
  23. ^ Tzetzes on Lycophron, 511
  24. ^ Callimachus, Aitia Fragment 66
  25. ^ Gaius Valerius Flaccus, Argonautica 4. 374 ff
  26. ^ Theoi Project - Inachides
  27. ^ Pausanias, Guide to Greece 6.22.7
  28. ^ Bibliotheca 2.6
  29. ^ Theoi Project - Ismene
  30. ^ Homer, Odyssey 13.96 ff
  31. ^ Statius, Thebaid 4.716
  32. ^ Strabo, Geography 9.2.25; 10.3.17
  33. ^ Pausanias, Guide to Greece 9.34.4
  34. ^ Theocritus, Idylls, 13. 44
  35. ^ Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica 1. 1225 ff.
  36. ^ Hyginus, Fabulae 14
  37. ^ Diodorus Siculus, Library of History 5.5.1
  38. ^ Theoi Project - Naiades Ortygiai
  39. ^ Quintus Smyrnaeus, Fall of Troy 3.300
  40. ^ Plato, Phaedrus 229
  41. ^ Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology, v. 3, page 238
  42. ^ Theoi Project - Rhyndacides
  43. ^ Callimachus, Hymn 4 to Delos 75 ff
  44. ^ Theoi Project - Strophia

Sources

  • Theoi Project - Naiades
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