World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Superior vena cava

Article Id: WHEBN0000242140
Reproduction Date:

Title: Superior vena cava  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Azygos vein, Brachiocephalic vein, Heart, Vein, Atrial septal defect
Collection: Veins of the Torso
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Superior vena cava

Superior vena cava
Veins
Details
Latin vena cava superior, vena maxima
Precursor common cardinal veins
Source
brachiocephalic vein, azygous vein
Identifiers
MeSH A07.231.908.949.815
Anatomical terminology

The superior vena cava (also known as the cava or cva) is a large diameter (24 mm), yet short, vein that carries deoxygenated blood from the upper half of the body to the heart's right atrium. It is located in the anterior right superior mediastinum.[1]

Contents

  • Structure of Superior and Inferior Vena Cava 1
  • Clinical significance 2
  • Additional images 3
  • References 4
  • See also 5

Structure of Superior and Inferior Vena Cava

It is formed by the left and right brachiocephalic veins (also referred to as the innominate veins), which also receive blood from the upper limbs, eyes and neck, behind the lower border of the first right costal cartilage. The azygos vein joins it just before it enters the right atrium, at the upper right front portion of the heart. It is also known as the cranial vena cava in other animals.

No valve divides the superior vena cava from the right atrium. As a result, the (right) atrial and (right) ventricular contractions are conducted up into the internal jugular vein and, through the sternocleidomastoid muscle, can be seen as the jugular venous pressure.

Clinical significance

Superior vena cava obstruction refers to a partial or complete obstruction of the superior vena cava, typically in the context of cancer such as a cancer of the lung, metastatic cancer, or lymphoma. Obstruction can lead to enlarged veins in the head and neck, and may also cause breathlessness, cough, chest pain, and difficulty swallowing. Pemberton's sign may be positive. Tumours causing obstruction may be treated with chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy to reduce their effects, and corticosteroids may also be given.[2]

In tricuspid valve regurgitation, these pulsations are very strong.

Additional images

References

  1. ^ http://www.gpnotebook.co.uk/simplepage.cfm?ID=463077437&linkID=32255&cook=no
  2. ^ Britton, the editors Nicki R. Colledge, Brian R. Walker, Stuart H. Ralston ; illustated by Robert (2010). Davidson's principles and practice of medicine. (21st ed.). Edinburgh: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier. p. 268.  

See also

This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.