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List of Roman aqueducts by date

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List of Roman aqueducts by date

This is a list of aqueducts in Rome listed in chronological order of their construction.

Ancient Rome

Porta Maggiore, the junction of Aqua Claudio and Aqua Anio Novus with Aqua Marcia and Aqua Tepula
  • Aqua Appia
    • built in 311 B.C.
    • source: springs 10 miles (16 km) to the east of Rome
    • length: 10 miles (16 km); underground from its source for 7 miles (11 km), then on arches for 3 miles (4.8 km) to its terminus in the Forum Boarium in Campus Martius
  • Aqua Anio Vetus
    • built in 272 - 269 BC
    • source: Anio (Aniene) River near Vicovaro, east of Rome
    • length: 40 miles (64 km); underground channel of stone from its source to its terminus on the Viminal Hill
  • Aqua Tepula
    • built in 125 BC
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 11 miles (18 km); underground for 5 miles (8.0 km) from its source, then on the same arches as those of the Aqua Marcia for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus on the Aventine Hill
  • Aqua Julia
    • built in 33 BC
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 14 miles (23 km); underground for 7 miles (11 km) from its source, then on the same arches as those of the Aqua Marcia and Aqua Tepula to its terminus on the Aventine Hill
  • Aqua Virgo
    • built in 19 BC
    • source: springs near Via Collatina, east of Rome
    • length: 14 miles (23 km); underground for 7 miles (11 km) from its source, then on arches for 7 miles (11 km) to its terminus at the baths of Agrippa in Campus Martius
  • Aqua Claudia
    • built in AD 52
    • source: springs in Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 43 miles (69 km); underground for 34 miles (55 km) from its source, then on arches for 9 miles (14 km) to its terminus on the Caelian Hill
    • later piped to the imperial palaces from the mid-first century on the Palatine Hill
  • Aqua Anio Novus
    • built in AD 52
    • source: Anio (Aniene) River, east of Rome
    • length: 54 miles (87 km); underground for 46 miles (74 km) from its source, then on arches for 8 miles (13 km), entering Rome at Porta Maggiore, atop the channel of Aqua Claudia to its terminus on the Caelian Hill
  • Aqua Traiana
    • built in AD 109
    • source: springs to the north of Lake Bracciano, northwest of Rome
    • length: 35 miles (56 km); underground for 29 miles (47 km) from its source, then on arches for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus on the Janiculum Hill
  • Aqua Alexandrina
    • built in AD 226
    • source: the Pantano springs near Via Prenestina, east of Rome
    • length: 14 miles (23 km); underground for 4 miles (6.4 km) from its source, then on arches for 10 miles (16 km) to its terminus at the baths of Alexander Severus in Campus Martius

Modern Rome

  • Acqua Vergine Antica
    • built in 1453
    • source: springs in Salone, east of Rome
    • length: 8 miles (13 km); underground from its source to its terminus at the fountain of Trevi on the Quirinal Hill
  • Acqua Felice
    • built in 1586
    • source: springs at Pantano Borghese, off Via Casilina
    • length: 15 miles (24 km); underground for 8 miles (13 km) from its source, in the channel of Aqua Alexandrina, then alternating on the arches of the Aqua Claudia and the Aqua Marcia for 7 miles (11 km) to its terminus at the fountain of Moses on the Quirinal Hill
  • Acqua Paola
    • built in 1611
    • source: Lake Bracciano, northwest of Rome
    • length: 20 miles (32 km); underground for 12 miles (19 km) from its source, in the channel of Aqua Trajana, then on arches for 8 miles (13 km) to its terminus at the fountain of Paul V on the Janiculum Hill,
    • later piped to Vatican Hill
  • Acqua Pia Antica Marcia
    • built in 1870
    • source: springs near Subiaco, east of Rome
    • length: 56 miles (90 km); underground for 50 miles (80 km) in the channel of Aqua Marcia, then on arches for 6 miles (9.7 km) to its terminus at the fountain of the Naiads on the Viminal Hill
  • Acqua Vergine Nuova
    • built in 1937
    • source: springs in Salone, east of Rome
    • length: 8 miles (13 km); underground from its source to its terminus at the fountains in Piazza del Popolo and the fountains on the western slope of the Pincio, overlooking Piazza del Popolo
  • Acqua Peschiera
    • built in 1949
    • source: springs in Sorgenti, northeast of Rome
    • length: 60 miles (97 km); underground from its source, splitting into two branches:
      • Peschiera Sinistra, approaching Rome from the east
      • Peschiera Destra, taking a westward route, crossing the Tiber River at Poggio Mireto Scalo, about thirty miles north of Rome to its terminus at the fountain of Piazzale degli Eroi, just north of Vatican Hill
  • Acqua Appio-Allesandrino
    • built in 1965
    • source: catchment basins along the volcano Angela at Pantano Borghese, Finocchi, Torre Angela

See also

References

  • Aquae Urbis Romae: The Waters of the City of Rome, Dr. Katherine Wentworth Rinne
  • The Waters of Rome, H.V. Morton, published by The Connoisseur and Michael Joseph, London, 1966.

External links

  • Models of Various Aqueducts of Ancient Rome
  • Routes of Various Aqueducts of Ancient Rome
  • Famous Fountains of Rome
  • The Fountains of Rome (by Region)
  • Famous Squares and Fountains of Rome
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