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Hull and Holderness Railway

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Hull and Holderness Railway

Hull and Holderness Ry
Withernsea
Hollym Gate
Patrington
Winestead
Ottringham
Keyingham
Burstwick
Hedon
Hedon Racecourse
after 1888
Marfleet
Hull and Barnsley Railway
after 1885
junction added 1862
Southcoates
to Victoria Dock Branch
Victoria

The Hull and Holderness Railway was a branch line railway in the East Riding of Yorkshire, England that connected the city of Kingston upon Hull with the North Sea coast at Withernsea.

History

Background

An early proposal for a railway eastwards from Hull into Holderness was made in 1845 by the York and North Midland Railway for a line from a junction on a line to the east Dock (Victoria Dock) at Drypool to Patrington via Hedon;[1] the Patrington line was not included in the resultant acts of 1846.[2][note 1]

A second attempt at a line was promoted by Hull businessman Anthony Bannister, with the intention of linking Hull with the rich agricultural area of South Holderness, and the development of a coastal village (Withernsea) into a new seaside resort, the silting up of Patrington Haven was another incentive for the construction of a line, since it could no longer be used for transportation.[2][4]

A prospectus was issued in 1852, and the "Hull and Holderness Railway Act" passed 1853.[2][4] Construction of the line in the flat and open Holderness plain was rapid and the line of about 18 miles (29 km) was opened on 24 June 1854.[5][note 2]

Description and operations

The line was originally built as a single track line, except sections at Hedon and near Ryehill. At Withernsea (which in 1851 had a population of only 109) a Hotel "Station Hotel" (later called "Queen's Hotel") was built.[6]

The line began at the York and North Midland Railway's Victoria Dock station and ran east, passing Hedon to the north, it then turned south-east passing Burstwick to the south half way between the village and Ryehill, then the line passed Keyingham to the north and then east and south to Patrington; the last village of any note before Withernsea which was to the north-east, and in which the line terminated.

Up till 1859 the Hull and Holderness Railway operated its own trains,[2] from 1860 the line was operated by the North Eastern Railway on lease rental, and in 1862 the same company acquired the line; a short connecting chord was built that allowed trains to run through onto the dock branch,[5] and, from 1864 services ran to Paragon station in the City centre via the Victoria Dock branch.[7]

Closure

Passenger service ended following the Beeching Report. The last passenger train ran on 19 October 1964. Goods traffic continued to use the whole line until 3 May 1965, after which it only operated between Hull and Hedon railway station; this service continued until 3 June 1968, the goods service to Marfleet lasted until 1972.

Line post closure

Most of the trackbed remains, and parts of have become a footpath. The Queen's Hotel in Withernsea became a convalescence home.[6] Most of the station buildings have become private residences,[8][9][10][11][12][13][14] with the exception of Withernsea station,[15] and Hollym Gate[16] which have been demolished.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ York and North Midland Railway (East Riding Branches) [No.1] Act (Victoria 9 & 10, Cap.65 ,1846); and the York and North Midland Railway (East Riding Branches) [No.2] Act (Victoria 9 & 10, Cap.66 ,1846)[3]
  2. ^ The date of opening was somewhere between 24 and 27 June depending on source.

References

  1. ^ "York and North Midland Railway. East Riding Branches", The London Gazette (20545), 29 November 1845: 6659 
  2. ^ a b c d Morfin 1991, pp. 176–177
  3. ^ "The Companion to the Almanac", The British Almanac of the Society for the diffusion of useful Knowledge, 1847: 92 
  4. ^ a b MacTurk 1970, pp. 137–140
  5. ^ a b Tomlinson 1914, pp. 522, 525, 606, 612
  6. ^ a b Gillet & MacMahon 1980, pp. 276–277
  7. ^ Goode 1981, p. 72
  8. ^ "Station Name: Marfleet". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  9. ^ "Station Name: Ryehill & Burstwick". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  10. ^ "Station Name: Hedon". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 12 July 2011. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  11. ^ "Station Name: Keyingham". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  12. ^ "Station Name: Ottringham". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  13. ^ "Station Name: Winestead". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  14. ^ "Station Name: Patrington". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  15. ^ "Station Name: Withernsea". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 
  16. ^ "Station Name: Hollym Gate". Disused Stations. Subterranea Britannica. 20 April 2010. Retrieved 25 November 2011. 

Sources

External links

  • Withernsea to Hull by Train. Youtube. 1957. , cab ride video
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