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Alabama–Huntsville Chargers men's ice hockey

 

Alabama–Huntsville Chargers men's ice hockey

Alabama–Huntsville Chargers
Current season
Alabama–Huntsville Chargers athletic logo
University University of Alabama in Huntsville
Conference WCHA
Head coach Mike Corbett
3rd year, 10–61–5
Arena Von Braun Center
Capacity: 6,602
Location Huntsville, Alabama
Colors Royal Blue and White
           
NCAA Tournament Champions
1996 (DII), 1998 (DII)
NCAA Tournament Appearances
1994 (DII), 1996 (DII), 1997, (DII), 1998 (DII), 2007, 2010
National Club Champions
1982, 1983, 1984
Conference Tournament Champions
CHA: 2007, 2010
Conference Regular Season Champions
CHA: 2000–01, 2002–03

The Alabama–Huntsville Chargers ice hockey team (commonly referred to as the UAH Chargers) is the only NCAA Division I ice hockey program located in the Southern United States, fielded by the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH) in Huntsville, Alabama.[1]

The Chargers play their home games at Propst Arena at the [2]

UAH is a member of the Western Collegiate Hockey Association.

Contents

  • History 1
    • Founding and club championships 1.1
    • Varsity and Division II championships 1.2
    • Return to Division I and CHA era 1.3
    • Independence and survival 1.4
  • Season-by-season record 2
  • Players 3
    • 2014–15 team 3.1
    • Alumni who have played in the NHL 3.2
  • Varsity records 4
    • Career 4.1
    • Season 4.2
    • Game 4.3
  • All-time coaching records 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

History

Founding and club championships

The UAH ice hockey program began as a non-varsity club team in the late 1970s. Joe Ritch organized the inaugural Charger team in 1979, and served as head coach. UAH defeated Emory University 11-4 in its first game on October 26, 1979.[2] UAH dominated opposition in its first three seasons, winning three Southern Collegiate Hockey Association championships. The Chargers won its first of three National Club Hockey Championships in 1982, defeating Southern Methodist 14-2 in the title game.[2]

For the 1982-83 season, Doug Ross became head coach as the Chargers moved to the Central States Collegiate Hockey League. UAH lost the conference championship game in overtime to Marquette, but the Chargers hosted the U.S. National Collegiate Club Hockey Championships, where they defeated Auburn (16-2), Arizona (7-4), and Penn State (5-4) en route to their second consecutive national championship.[2]

UAH hosted the club national championship tournament again in 1984, and the Chargers claimed a third straight title with wins over Miami University (3-1), Indiana (13-4), and Ohio (12-1). UAH hosted the tournament a third time in 1985, but its bid for a fourth straight championship fell short with a 6-2 loss to North Dakota State.[2]

Varsity and Division II championships

UAH elevated the hockey program to varsity status for the 1985-86 season as a member of the NAIA. The school became a full NCAA Division II member in 1986. With no NCAA sponsorship of hockey at the Division II level, UAH moved its program to Division I as an independent beginning with the 1987-88 season.[2] The Chargers went 63-81-8 in their five seasons in Division I. UAH finished with a winning season twice in that span: 1988-89 (15-10-1) and the last season, 1991-92 (18-10-1).[2]

UAH returned to Division II hockey in 1992 with the NCAA resuming sponsorship of a national championship. In 1994, the Chargers hosted its first Division II national championship series, but lost to Bemidji State in overtime of a mini-game tiebreaker.[2] After narrowly missing a chance at the title in 1995, the 1995-96 UAH team went undefeated (26-0-3) in the 1995-96 season and beat Bemidji State 7-1 and 3-0 at the Von Braun Center to claim its first NCAA championship in any sport.[2] The Chargers traveled to Bemidji State for the 1997 finals, losing 4-2 and 3-2. The 1997-98 UAH team claimed its second Division II championship in 1998, beating Bemidji again 6-2 and 5-2 in Huntsville to finish 24-3-3.[2]

Return to Division I and CHA era

UAH moved ice hockey back to Division I for the 1998-99 season as an independent, and the team became a charter member of College Hockey America starting with the 1999-2000 season. The Chargers won CHA regular season championships in 2001 and 2003.[2]

The 2006-07 UAH team earned the school's first CHA tournament title and NCAA Division I tournament bid. The Chargers spotted Robert Morris a 4-0 first-period lead, but rallied to beat the Colonials 5-4 in overtime. At the Midwest Regional in Grand Rapids, Mich., UAH took No. 1 seed Notre Dame to double overtime before losing 3-2 in Doug Ross's final game as head coach before retiring.[2]

Danton Cole became UAH's third head coach in 2007.[2]

In 2009, with the CHA's demise imminent following the announced departures of Niagara, Robert Morris, and Bemidji State, UAH applied for membership to the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. The CCHA denied UAH's application on August 11.[3]

UAH won the final CHA tournament in 2010, beating Niagara 3-2 in overtime for its second berth in the Division I tournament. The Chargers lost to top-ranked Miami 2-1 at the Midwest Regional in Fort Wayne, Ind.[2]

Independence and survival

Cole left UAH in 2010 to become the head coach of the U.S. National Development Team.[4] Assistant Chris Luongo was promoted to head coach as the Chargers became the lone independent program in Division I.[2] The program struggled as an independent as scheduling and recruiting hurt without a championship to play for. UAH was a combined 6-54-3 in its first two independent seasons from 2010-2012.

Early into the 2011-12 season, interim UAH President Malcolm Portera announced that the 2011–12 season would be the school's final season competing at the NCAA Division I level, citing financial reasons. The program would be "realigned" as a club team, and the coaches' jobs would be eliminated.[5] New UAH president Dr. Robert Altenkirch reversed the decision after he and school administrators met with local supporters on December 6, 2011.[6] The school set up a campaign to raise funds for the program, with the goal of getting the Chargers into a conference.[7]

Despite the questions about its hockey future, UAH was the host institution for the 2012 Frozen Four in Tampa, Florida.[8]

A week before the start of the 2012-13 season, UAH replaced Luongo and hired Kurt Kleinendorst to become the program's fifth head coach.[9]

On January 17, 2013, after months of discussions with conference officials and league member representatives, UAH formally applied to and was accepted to join the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. The Chargers began conference play in the 2013-14 season.[10]

Kleinendorst resigned on May 29, 2013.[11] UAH named Mike Corbett as its sixth head hockey coach on July 8, 2013.[12]

Season-by-season record

Players

2014–15 team

As of Sept. 14, 2015[13]

# S/P/C Player Class Pos Height Weight DoB Hometown Previous team
7 McHugh, MaxMax McHugh Sophomore F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1993-08-20 Seattle, Washington Dubuque (USHL)
9 Anderson, HunterHunter Anderson Freshman F 6' 4" (1.93 m) 212 lb (96 kg) 1994-03-01 Savage, Minnesota Langley (BCHL)
10 Fletcher, BrentBrent Fletcher Junior F 6' 2" (1.88 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1992-05-09 New Westminster, British Columbia Merritt (BCHL)
11 Prince, JackJack Prince Senior F 6' 3" (1.91 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1991-02-14 Leicester, England Texas (NAHL)
12 Soquila, ReganRegan Soquila Junior F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1993-06-03 Maple Ridge, British Columbia Merritt (BCHL)
14 Dunn, MadisonMadison Dunn Freshman F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 165 lb (75 kg) 1995-10-04 Calgary, Alberta Brooks (AJHL)
15 Gorowsky, HansHans Gorowsky Freshman F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 174 lb (79 kg) 1994-12-20 Lino Lakes, Minnesota Fairbanks (NAHL)
16 Houcher, JetlanJetlan Houcher Freshman F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 187 lb (85 kg) 1994-02-15 Paradise Valley, Alberta Fort McMurray (AJHL)
18 Salerno, BrandonBrandon Salerno Freshman F 5' 8" (1.73 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1995-07-31 Toronto, Ontario Pickering (OJHL)
19 Brears, ChadChad Brears Senior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1991-05-08 Cold Lake, Alberta Merritt (BCHL)
21 Poulsen, TylerTyler Poulsen Freshman F 5' 7" (1.7 m) 160 lb (73 kg) 1993-04-01 Arvada, Colorado Topeka (NAHL)
22 Salhany, MattMatt Salhany Junior F 5' 10" (1.78 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1993-01-08 Warwick, Rhode Island Boston (EJHL)
23 Marooney, CodyCody Marooney Junior F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 200 lb (91 kg) 1992-07-07 Eden Prairie, Minnesota Brookings (NAHL)
24 Saulnier, BrennanBrennan Saulnier Sophomore C 6' 0" (1.83 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1993-12-29 Halifax, Nova Scotia Fort McMurray (AJHL)
25 Wilcox, AdamAdam Wilcox Freshman F 6' 1" (1.85 m) 201 lb (91 kg) 1994-04-25 Fairbanks (NAHL)
26 Kestner, JoshJosh Kestner Sophomore F 6' 0" (1.83 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1993-11-08 Huntsville, Alabama Sarnia (GOJHL)
27 Block, JamesJames Block Sophomore F 5' 11" (1.8 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1996-05-24 Wrightstown, Wisconsin Wrightstown HS (USHS–WI)
2 Knight, CamCam Knight Freshman D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1993-08-20 Seattle, Washington Dubuque (USHL)
3 White, AndersonAnderson White Senior D/F 6' 4" (1.93 m) 220 lb (100 kg) 1991-08-16 Caledon, Ontario Chilliwack (BCHL)
4 Misuraca, FrankFrank Misuraca Senior D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 180 lb (82 kg) 1991-09-06 Clinton Township, Michigan Corpus Christi (NAHL)
5 Champagne, CodyCody Champagne Sophomore D 5' 11" (1.8 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1994-08-09 Brookfield, Connecticut Topeka (NAHL)
6 Carlson, BrandonBrandon Carlson Junior D 6' 2" (1.88 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1992-06-15 Huntington Beach, California Dubuque (USHL)
8 Teets, JohnJohn Teets Freshman D 6' 3" (1.91 m) 194 lb (88 kg) 1994-08-10 Fairbanks, Alaska Fairbanks (NAHL)
20 Parker, BrandonBrandon Parker Sophomore D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1993-02-17 Faribault, Minnesota Brookings (NAHL)
28 gosselin, KurtKurt gosselin Freshman D 5' 10" (1.78 m) 190 lb (86 kg) 1994-11-30 Brighton, Michigan Alberni Valley (BCHL)
33 Buri, RichardRichard Buri Sophomore D 6' 5" (1.96 m) 215 lb (98 kg) 1994-01-12 Nitra, Slovakia Minnesota (NAHL)
30 Larose, MattMatt Larose Junior G 6' 5" (1.96 m) 210 lb (95 kg) 1992-08-15 Nanaimo, British Columbia Wellington (OJHL)
32 Uhelski, JordanJordan Uhelski Sophomore G 6' 1" (1.85 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1993-08-04 Flint, Michigan Muskegon (USHL)
35 Guerriero, CarmineCarmine Guerriero Junior G 5' 11" (1.8 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1992-02-20 Montreal, Quebec Hawkesbury (CCHL)

Alumni who have played in the NHL

Varsity records

Since the 1985-86 season through the 2014-15 season.[15]

Career

  • Most goals: 96 by Mario Mazzuca (1992–96)
  • Most assists: 118 by Tony Guzzo (1993–97)
  • Most points: 179 by Tony Guzzo (1993–97)
  • Most penalty minutes: 467 by Shane Stewart (1996–2000)
  • Most goaltending wins: 66 by Derek Puppa (1992–96)
  • Lowest goals against average: 2.36 by Cedrick Billequey (1995–98)
  • Highest save percentage: .918 by Scott Munroe (2002–06)
  • Most shutouts: 8 by Mark Byrne (1999–2003)

Season

Game

All-time coaching records

Tenure Coach Years Record
Club
1979–1982 Joe Ritch 3 79–4–1 (.946)
1982–1985 Doug Ross 3 75–17–3 (.805)
Totals 2 coaches 6 seasons 154–21–4 (.872)
Varsity (NAIA/NCAA)
1985–2007 Doug Ross 22 376–255–42 (.590)
2007–2010 Danton Cole 3 23–59–12 (.309)
2010–2012 Chris Luongo 2 6–54–3 (.119)
2012–2013 Kurt Kleinendorst 1 3–21–1 (.140)
2013–present Mike Corbett 2 10–61–5 (.164)
Totals 5 coaches 30 seasons 418–450–63 (.483)

See also

References

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  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o
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  14. ^
  15. ^

External links

  • UAH Chargers Hockey website
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