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Large-cell lymphoma

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Large-cell lymphoma

Large-cell lymphoma
Classification and external resources
Micrograph of a primary mediastinal large B-cell lymphoma, a type of large-cell lymphoma. H&E stain.
ICD-9 200.7
MeSH D016403

One classification system for lymphomas divides the diseases according to the size of the white blood cells that has turned cancerous. The large-cell lymphomas have large cells. A large cell, in this context, has a diameter of 17 to 20 µm.[1] Other groups of lymphomas in this system are the small-cell lymphomas and mixed-cell lymphomas.

Types

B cell

Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is the most common of the large-cell lymphomas. MeSH now classifies the phrase "large-cell lymphoma" under "Diffuse large B cell lymphoma".[2]

Many other B-cell lymphomas feature large cells:

Activated B-Cell Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma, or ABC-DLBCL, is believed to be caused by aberrant activation of a critical intracellular pathway. This intracellular signaling pathway involved in B-cell activation and proliferation stays constantly activated, driving lymphocytes to proliferate continuously. The inhibition of this pathway can be induced by a drug known as NEMO Binding Domain, or NBD, a peptide causing increased cell death of malignant lymphocytes.

T cell

Less commonly, a large-cell lymphoma may feature T cells. Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma is an example of a large-cell lymphoma that involves T cells. Of the large-cell T-cell lymphomas, it has the best prognosis.

References

  1. ^ Turgeon, Mary Louise (2005). Clinical hematology: theory and procedures. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. p. 221.  
  2. ^ Large cell lymphoma at the US National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH)
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