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Thomas A. Steitz

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Title: Thomas A. Steitz  
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Subject: William Lipscomb, Joan A. Steitz, Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry, Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Paul D. Boyer
Collection: 1940 Births, American Biochemists, American Biophysicists, American Nobel Laureates, American People of German Descent, Crystallographers, Foreign Members of the Royal Society, Harvard University Alumni, Howard Hughes Medical Investigators, Lawrence University Alumni, Living People, Members of the United States National Academy of Sciences, Nobel Laureates in Chemistry, People from Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Yale Department of Molecular Biophysics & Biochemistry Faculty, Yale Sterling Professors, Yale University Faculty
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Thomas A. Steitz

Thomas A. Steitz
Born (1940-08-23) August 23, 1940
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
Residence USA
Nationality American
Fields Crystallography
Institutions Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University
Alma mater Wauwatosa High School, Lawrence College, Harvard University
Doctoral advisor William N. Lipscomb, Jr.
Notable students Nenad Ban, Robert Fletterick, Timothy Richmond, Poul Nissen
Known for Bio-crystallography
Notable awards Keio Medical Science Prize (2006)
Gairdner Foundation International Award (2007)
Nobel Prize in Chemistry (2009)
Spouse Joan A. Steitz

Thomas Arthur Steitz (born August 23, 1940) is the Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Yale University, New Haven.

Steitz was awarded the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Venkatraman Ramakrishnan and Ada Yonath "for studies of the structure and function of the ribosome".[1] Steitz also won the Gairdner International Award in 2007[2] "for his studies on the structure and function of the ribosome which showed that the peptidyl transferase was an RNA catalyzed reaction, and for revealing the mechanism of inhibition of this function by antibiotics".[3]

Contents

  • Career 1
  • Honors 2
  • Private life 3
  • Publications 4
  • See also 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Career

Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin,[1] Steitz studied chemistry as an undergraduate at Lawrence University, graduating in 1962. While there he was a member of the fraternity, Delta Tau Delta, the Delta Nu chapter. In June 2010, the University renamed its chemistry building Thomas A. Steitz Hall of Science.[4]

He received a Ph.D. in biochemistry and molecular biology from Harvard University in 1966 where he worked under the direction of subsequent 1976 chemistry Nobel Prize winner William N. Lipscomb, Jr. While at Harvard, after the training task of determining the structure of the small molecule methyl ethylene phosphate,[5] Steitz made these contributions to determining the atomic structures of carboxypeptidase A [6] [7] [8] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] and aspartate carbamoyltransferase, [14] each the largest atomic structure determined in its time. The structure of the large 50S ribosomal subunit, which Steitz later determined in his own lab at Yale University, and for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize is even larger.

Steitz did postdoctoral research as a Jane Coffin Childs Postdoctoral Fellow at the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology at Cambridge University during 1967–1970. He was also a Macy Fellow at the University of Göttingen during 1976–1977 and a Fairchild Scholar at the California Institute of Technology during 1984-1985.[2]

Honors

Private life

He is married to Joan A. Steitz, also a Sterling Professor of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry at Yale. In 2010, he lives in Branford, Connecticut.[16]

Publications

  • Steitz, T. A., et al. "Determination of the Atomic-Resolution Crystal Structure of the Large Subunit from the Ribosome of Haloarcula marismortui;", nsls newsletter, (November 2000).
  • Steitz, T. A., et al. "The Atomic Resolution Crystal Structure of the Large Ribosomal Subunit from Haloarcula marismortui", NSLS Activity Report (2000).

See also

References

  1. ^ a b 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Nobel Foundation.
  2. ^ a b Tom Steitz, Thomas Steitz Lab.
  3. ^ Thomas A. Steitz, The Gairdner 50 Foundation.
  4. ^ "Lawrence To Honor Nobel Prize Winner with Building Renaming Ceremony on Friday". Lawrence University. 9 June 2010. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  5. ^ Steitz, T. A. and Lipscomb, W. N., "Molecular Structure of Methyl Ethylene Phosphate," J Am. Chem. Soc. 87, 2488 (1965).
  6. ^ Hartsuck JA, Ludwig ML, Muirhead H, Steitz TA, Lipscomb WN. Carbyxypeptidase A, II, The Three-dimensional Electron Density Map at 6 A Resolution. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1965 February; 53(2): 396–403.
  7. ^ Lipscomb, W. N., Coppola, J. C., Hartsuck, J. A., Ludwig, M. L., Muirhead, H., Searl, J. and Steitz, T. A., "The Structure of Carboxypeptidase A. III. Molecular Structure at 6 A Resolution," J Mol. Biol. 19, 423-441 (1966).
  8. ^ Ludwig, M. L., Coppola, J. C., Hartsuck, J. A., Muirhead, H., Searl, J., Steitz, T. A. and Lipscomb, W. N., "Molecular Structure of Carboxypeptidase A at 6 A Resolution," Federation Proc. 25, Part I, 346 (1966).
  9. ^ Ludwig ML, Hartsuck JA, Steitz TA, Muirhead H, Coppola JC, Reeke GN, Lipscomb WN. The Structure of Carboxypeptidase A, IV. Prelimitary Results at 2.8 A Resolution, and a Substrate Complex at 6 A Resolution. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1967 March; 57(3): 511–514.
  10. ^ Reeke GN, Hartsuck JA, Ludwig ML, Quiocho FA, Steitz TA, Lipscomb WN. The structure of carboxypeptidase A. VI. Some Results at 2.0-A Resolution, and the Complex with Glycyl-Tyrosine at 2.8-A Resolution. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1967 Dec;58(6):2220–2226.
  11. ^ Lipscomb, W. N, Ludwig, M. L., Hartsuck, J. A., Steitz, T. A., Muirhead, H., Coppola, J. C., Reeke, G. N. and Quiocho, F. A., "Molecular Structure of Carboxypeptidase A at 2.8 A Resolution and an Isomorphous Enzyme-Substrate Complex at 6 A Resolution," Federation Proc. 26, 385 (1967).
  12. ^ Lipscomb WN, Hartsuck JA, Reeke GN, Jr, Quiocho FA, Bethge PH, Ludwig ML, Steitz TA, Muirhead H, Coppola JC. The structure of carboxypeptidase A. VII. The 2.0-angstrom resolution studies of the enzyme and of its complex with glycyltyrosine, and mechanistic deductions. Brookhaven Symp Biol. 1968 Jun;21(1):24–90.
  13. ^ Coppola, J. C., Hartsuck, J. A., Ludwig, M. L., Muirhead, H., Searl, J., Steitz, T. A. and Lipscomb, W. N., "The Low Resolution Structure of Carboxypeptidase A," Acta Cryst. 21, A160 (1966).
  14. ^ Steitz TA, Wiley DC, Lipscomb WN. The structure of aspartate transcarbamylase, I. A molecular twofold axis in the complex with cytidine triphosphate. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 1967 November; 58(5): 1859–1861.
  15. ^ "Foreign Members". Royal Society. Retrieved 2012-03-20. 
  16. ^ http://www.miptalk.com/thomas-steitz/

External links

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