World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Operation Olympic Games

Article Id: WHEBN0036003078
Reproduction Date:

Title: Operation Olympic Games  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Stuxnet
Collection:
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Operation Olympic Games

Operation Olympic Games was a covert and still President Obama, who heeded Bush’s advice to continue cyber attacks on Iranian nuclear facility at Natanz.[1] Bush believed that the strategy was the only way to prevent an Israeli conventional strike on Iranian nuclear facilities.[1]

History

During Bush's second term, General James Cartwright along with other intelligence officials presented Bush with a sophisticated code that would act as an offensive cyber weapon. "The goal was to gain access to the Natanz plant's industrial computer controls ... the computer code would invade the specialized computers that command the centrifuges."[1] Collaboration happened with Israel's SIGINT intelligence service, Unit 8200. Israel's involvement was important to the Americans because the former had "deep intelligence about operations at Natanz that would be vital to making the cyber attack a success."[1] Additionally, American officials wanted to "dissuade the Israelis from carrying out their own preemptive strike against Iranian nuclear facilities."[1] To prevent a conventional strike, Israel had to be deeply involved in Operation Olympic Games. The computer virus created by the two countries became known as "the bug," and Stuxnet by the IT community once it became public. The malicious software temporarily halted approximately 1,000 of the 5,000 centrifuges from spinning at Natanz.

A programming error in "the bug" caused it to spread to computers outside of Natanz. When an engineer "left Natanz and connected [his] computer to the Internet, the American- and Israeli-made bug failed to recognize that its environment had changed."[1] The code replicated on the Internet and was subsequently exposed for public dissemination. IT security firms Symantec and Kaspersky Lab have since examined Stuxnet. It is unclear whether the Americans or Israelis introduced the programming error.

Significance

According to the Atlantic Monthly, Operation Olympic Games is "probably the most significant covert manipulation of the electromagnetic spectrum since World War II, when Polish cryptanalysts[2] broke the Enigma cipher that allowed access to Nazi codes."[3] The New Yorker claims Operation Olympic Games is "the first formal offensive act of pure cyber sabotage by the United States against another country, if you do not count electronic penetrations that have preceded conventional military attacks, such as that of Iraq's military computers before the invasion of 2003."[4] Therefore, "American and Israeli official action can stand as justification for others."[4]

The Washington Post reported that Flame malware was also part of Olympic Games.[5]

Leak investigation

In June 2013, it was reported that Cartwright was the target of a year-long investigation by the US Department of Justice into the leak of classified information about the operation to the US media.[6]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g President Barack Obama “secretly ordered increasingly sophisticated attacks on the computer systems that run Iran’s main nuclear enrichment facilities, significantly expanding America’s first sustained use of cyber weapons”
  2. ^ Rejewski, Marian. “How Polish Mathematicians Broke the Enigma Cipher.” Annals of the History of Computing 3, no. 3 (July 1981): 213–34. doi:10.1109/MAHC.1981.10033.
  3. ^
  4. ^ a b
  5. ^
  6. ^

Further reading

  • David E. Sanger, Confront and Conceal: Obama’s Secret Wars and Surprising Use of American Power, Crown, June 2012, ISBN 978-0307718020
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.