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1980 World Championships in Athletics

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Title: 1980 World Championships in Athletics  
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1980 World Championships in Athletics

1980 World Championships in Athletics
Host city Sittard, Netherlands
Nations participating 21
Athletes participating 42
Events 2
Dates 14–16 August 1980
Main venue De Baandert
1976 Malmö 1983 Helsinki  >

The 1980 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF). Hosted from 14 to 16 August 1980 at the De Baandert in Sittard, Netherlands, it featured two events: the women's 400 metres hurdles and the women's 3000 metres run.[1] West Germany's Birgit Friedmann took the first women's world title in the 3000 m, while her East German counterpart Bärbel Broschat became the first women's 400 m hurdles world champion.[2]

Historically, the IAAF and the International Olympic Committee (IOC) agreed that the Athletics at the Summer Olympics served as the world championship event for the sport. The IAAF began to expand its programme of approved events for women and this conflicted with the Olympic athletics programme. The 400 m hurdles was recently introduced event for female athletes while the 3000 m marked the increasing popularity of long-distance running events among women. Neither event was contested at the 1980 Moscow Olympics. The boycott of those Olympics and the presence of the Liberty Bell Classic (an alternative event for the boycotting nations) gave the IAAF additional incentive to hold its own competition; although the Soviet Union withdrew, the events in Sittard attracted entries from countries on both sides of the Western and Eastern divide.[3]

A total of 42 women from 21 nations entered the competition – there were 18 participants in the 3000 m and 24 athletes in the 400 m hurdles. The hurdles format had four heats of six athletes, two semi-finals of eight athletes, then an "A" and a "B" final. The 3000 m run had two stages: two heats of nine athletes each, followed by a final of twelve athletes.[4]

The tournament followed the 1976 Summer Olympics.[2] The 1980 World Championships preceded the launch of the IAAF's independent global event, with the inaugural 1983 World Championships in Athletics taking place three years later with a programme of 41 events.[5]

One athlete, Spain's Rosa Colorado, later had her results at the championships disqualified for doping offences.[6]

Medallists

Event Gold Silver Bronze
3000 metres  Birgit Friedmann (FRG)  Karoline Nemetz (SWE)  Ingrid Kristiansen (NOR)
400 metres hurdles  Bärbel Broschat (GDR)  Ellen Neumann (GDR)  Petra Pfaff (GDR)

Schedule

Date Event
14 August 400 m hurdles heats
3000 m heats
15 August 400 m hurdles semi-finals
16 August 400 m hurdles finals
3000 m final

400 metres hurdles results

Heats

Hurdles winner Bärbel Broschat was the fastest athlete in all three rounds.
Qualifying rule: the first three athletes in each heat (Q) plus the four fastest non-qualifiers (q) progressed to the semi-finals.
Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 3 Bärbel Broschat  East Germany 56.13 Q
2 4 Ellen Neumann  East Germany 56.35 Q
3 1 Esther Mahr  United States 57.51 Q
4 1 Hilde Frederiksen  Norway 57.72 Q
5 2 Petra Pfaff  East Germany 57.92 Q
6 4 Christine Warden  Great Britain 57.84 Q
7 2 Lynette Foreman  Australia 58.07 Q
8 3 Mary Appleby  Ireland 58.54 Q
8 1 Monserrat Pujol  Spain 58.54 Q
10 3 Rosa Colorado  Spain 58.79 Q
11 1 Olga Commandeur  Netherlands 58.87 q
12 4 Helle Sichlau  Denmark 58.99 Q
13 2 Susan Dalgoutté  Great Britain 59.63 Q
14 2 Esther Kaufmann   Switzerland 59.74 q
15 2 Simone Büngener  West Germany 59.98 q
16 3 Francine Gendron  Canada 1:00.40 q
17 3 Debra Melrose  United States 1:00.46
18 1 Lai Lih-Jian  Chinese Taipei 1:01.01
19 3 Ruth Dubois  France 1:01.12
20 2 Dominique Le Disset  France 1:01.22
21 4 Kim Whitehead  United States 1:01.33
22 4 Andrea Wachter  Canada 1:02.28
23 4 Célestine N'Drin  Ivory Coast 1:04.91
1 Kirsi Ulvinen  Sweden DSQ

Semi-finals

Qualifying rule: the first four athletes in each semi-final (Q) progressed to the "A" final. The remaining non-qualifiers were entered into the "B" final.
Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 1 Bärbel Broschat  East Germany 55.89 Q
1 2 Ellen Neumann  East Germany 55.89 Q
3 2 Esther Mahr  United States 56.16 Q
4 1 Petra Pfaff  East Germany 56.78 Q
5 1 Mary Appleby  Ireland 57.06 Q
6 2 Christine Warden  Great Britain 57.26 Q
7 1 Hilde Frederiksen  Norway 57.44 Q
8 2 Lynette Foreman  Australia 57.46 Q
9 2 Rosa Colorado  Spain 57.47
10 1 Monserrat Pujol  Spain 57.72
11 2 Olga Commandeur  Netherlands 57.93
12 1 Helle Sichlau  Denmark 58.44
13 2 Simone Büngener  West Germany 59.11
14 2 Esther Kaufmann   Switzerland 59.55
15 1 Susan Dalgoutté  Great Britain 59.85
16 1 Francine Gendron  Canada 1:00.14

"A" final

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1st Bärbel Broschat  East Germany 54.55 CR, PB
2nd Ellen Neumann  East Germany 54.56
3rd Petra Pfaff  East Germany 55.84
4 Mary Appleby  Ireland 56.51
5 Esther Mahr  United States 56.81
6 Hilde Frederiksen  Norway 56.85
7 Lynette Foreman  Australia 58.24
N/A Christine Warden  Great Britain DSQ

"B" final

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1 Rosa Colorado  Spain 57.51
2 Helle Sichlau  Denmark 58.03
3 Monserrat Pujol  Spain 58.38
4 Simone Büngener  West Germany 58.77
5 Susan Dalgoutté  Great Britain 59.31
6 Esther Kaufmann   Switzerland 59.41
7 Francine Gendron  Canada 59.61
N/A Olga Commandeur  Netherlands DNS

3000 metres results

Heats

Qualifying rule: the first five athletes in each heat (Q) plus the two fastest non-qualifiers (q) progressed to the final.

Rank Heat Name Nationality Time Notes
1 1 Aurora Cunha  Portugal 9:04.7 Q
1 2 Birgit Friedmann  West Germany 9:04.7 Q
3 2 Breda Pergar  Yugoslavia 9:04.9 Q
4 2 Karoline Nemetz  Sweden 9:04.9 Q
5 2 Joelle Debrouwer  France 9:05.0 Q
6 2 Penny Werthner  Canada 9:05.8 Q
7 1 Charlotte Teske  West Germany 9:06.1 Q
8 1 Ingrid Kristiansen  Norway 9:06.4 Q
9 1 Eva Ernström  Sweden 9:06.5 Q
10 2 Wendy Smith  Great Britain 9:07.3 q
11 1 Geri Fitch  Canada 9:07.6 Q
12 1 Mary Shea  United States 9:09.4 q
13 2 Julie Shea  United States 9:11.4
14 2 Fionnuala Morrish  Ireland 9:13.8
15 1 Anat Meiri  Israel 9:26.7
16 1 Anne Audain  New Zealand 9:26.8
17 1 Brenda Webb  United States 9:27.6
18 2 Olga Caccaviello  Argentina 10:01.2

Final

Rank Name Nationality Time Notes
1st Birgit Friedmann  West Germany 8:48.05 CR, PB
2nd Karoline Nemetz  Sweden 8:50.22
3rd Ingrid Kristiansen  Norway 8:58.8
4 Joelle Debrouwer  France 8:59.0
5 Breda Pergar  Yugoslavia 8:59.7
6 Penny Werthner  Canada 9:03.5
7 Charlotte Teske  West Germany 9:04.3
8 Eva Ernström  Sweden 9:07.7
9 Aurora Cunha  Portugal 9:11.2
10 Mary Shea  United States 9:13.7
11 Geri Fitch  Canada 9:37.6
N/A Wendy Smith  Great Britain DNF

Participation

Medal table

Rank Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  East Germany 1 1 1 3
2  West Germany 1 0 0 1
3  Sweden 0 1 0 1
4  Norway 0 0 1 1

References

  1. ^ Archive of Past Events. IAAF. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  2. ^ a b IAAF World Championships in Athletics. GBR Athletics. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  3. ^ Matthews, Peter (2012). Historical Dictionary of Track and Field (pg. 217). Scarecrow Press (eBook). Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  4. ^
  5. ^ 1st IAAF World Championships in Athletics. IAAF. Retrieved on 2013-09-08.
  6. ^ IAAF Statistics Book Moscow 2013 (archived). IAAF (2013). Retrieved on 2015-07-06.
Results

External links

  • Official IAAF website
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