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1981 UEFA Cup Final

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Title: 1981 UEFA Cup Final  
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Subject: AZ Alkmaar, John Wark, Eredivisie, George Burley, Portman Road, Steve McCall, Alan Brazil, Arnold Mühren, Eric Gates, Paul Cooper (footballer born 1953)
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1981 UEFA Cup Final

1981 UEFA Cup Final
Event 1980–81 UEFA Cup
First leg
Date 6 May 1981
Venue Portman Road, Ipswich
Referee Adolf Prokop (East Germany)
Attendance 27,532
Second leg
Date 20 May 1981
Venue Olympic Stadium, Amsterdam
Referee Walter Eschweiler (West Germany)
Attendance 28,500

The 1981 UEFA Cup Final was the two-legged final of the 1980–81 UEFA Cup, the tenth season of the UEFA Cup, UEFA's second-tier club football tournament. The matches were contested between Ipswich Town of England and AZ '67 of the Netherlands; despite losing the second leg of the final 4–2,[1] Ipswich won 5–4 on aggregate.[2] The legs were played on 6 May 1981 at Ipswich's Portman Road stadium and on 20 May 1981 at the Olympic Stadium in Amsterdam.

Route to the final

Ipswich Town qualified for the UEFA Cup as a result of finishing third the previous season behind Liverpool and Manchester United.[3] AZ '67 finished the 1979–80 Eredivisie season in second place, three points behind champions AFC Ajax.[4]

Ipswich Town played Greek side Aris Saloniki in the first round of the competition, winning 5–1 at Portman Road and going through 6–4 on aggregate having lost the return leg in Greece 3–1. Two victories over Czechoslovakian club Bohemians in the second round, was followed by a 5–1 aggregate win against Polish team Widzew Łódź. The quarter-finals saw Ipswich face French team Saint-Étienne, who, with Michel Platini, would go on to win the French league that season. An "marvellous" 4–1 victory for the English club in France,[5] followed by a 3–1 home win, knocked out the French team with a 7–2 aggregate victory. Two 1–0 wins over West German club 1. FC Köln saw Ipswich progress to their first European cup final.[1]

AZ started their European campaign with a 10–0 aggregate victory over Luxembourgeois team Red Boys Differdange, which was followed by a 6–1 overall win against Bulgarian club Levski Spartak. The third round ended with a 7–2 aggregate win for the Dutch club over Yugoslav team Radnički Niš; this was followed with a 2–1 overall victory against Belgian club Lokeren. An away 1–1 draw followed by a 3–2 home victory against French club Sochaux, secured AZ '67's passage in the UEFA Cup final.[1]

Match details

First leg

6 May 1981 (1981-05-06)
19:30
Ipswich Town 3–0 AZ '67
pen.)
 47'
 55'
Report

Overview (archive) Overview

Portman Road, Ipswich
Attendance: 27,532
Referee: Adolf Prokop (East Germany)
Ipswich Town
AZ '67
GK 1 Paul Cooper
DF 2 Steve McCall
DF 3 Mick Mills (c)
MF 4 Frans Thijssen
DF 5 Russell Osman
DF 6 Terry Butcher
MF 7 John Wark
MF 8 Arnold Mühren
FW 9 Paul Mariner
FW 10 Alan Brazil
FW 11 Eric Gates
Manager:
Bobby Robson
GK 1 Eddy Treijtel
RB 2 Richard van der Meer
CB 3 John Metgod
CB 4 Ronald Spelbos
LB 5 Hugo Hovenkamp (c)
MF 6 Jan Peters
MF 7 Jos Jonker
MF 8 Peter Arntz
MF 9 Kristen Nygaard  57'
CF 10 Kees Kist
CF 11 Pier Tol
Substitutes:
FW 12 Kurt Welzl  57'
Manager:
Georg Keßler

Second leg

20 May 1981 (1981-05-20)
19:30
AZ '67 4–2 Ipswich Town
 7'
 25'
 40'
 73'
Report

Overview (archive) Overview

 4'
 32'
Olympic Stadium, Amsterdam
Attendance: 28,500
Referee: Walter Eschweiler (East Germany)
AZ '67
Ipswich Town
GK 1 Eddy Treijtel
RB 2 Hans Reijnders
CB 3 John Metgod
CB 4 Ronald Spelbos
LB 5 Hugo Hovenkamp (c)
MF 6 Jan Peters
MF 7 Jos Jonker
MF 8 Peter Arntz
MF 9 Kristen Nygaard
CF 10 Kurt Welzl  80'
CF 11 Pier Tol  46'
Substitutes:
FW 12 Kees Kist  46'
MF 14 Chris van den Dungen  80'
Manager:
Georg Keßler
GK 1 Paul Cooper
DF 2 Steve McCall
DF 3 Mick Mills (c)
MF 4 Frans Thijssen
DF 5 Russell Osman
DF 6 Terry Butcher
MF 7 John Wark
MF 8 Arnold Mühren
FW 9 Paul Mariner
FW 10 Alan Brazil
FW 11 Eric Gates
Manager:
Bobby Robson

Summary

Ipswich's John Wark set a competition record by scoring 14 goals,[6] equalling the long-standing scoring record in a European competition, set by José Altafini of A.C. Milan in the 1962–63 European Cup.[7][nb 1]

Post-match

Bobby Robson left the club a year later to become the England national football team manager,[9] leading England to the semi-finals of the 1990 FIFA World Cup, the best result for the nation since another former Ipswich manager, Alf Ramsey, led the country to World Cup victory in 1966.[10]

AZ '67 went on to reach the semi-final of the 2004–05 UEFA Cup;[11] Ipswich made it to the third round in the 2001–02 UEFA Cup.[12]

Notes

  1. ^ The tally was exceeded by Jürgen Klinsmann, who scored 15 in the 1995–96 UEFA Cup.[8]

References

  1. ^ a b c Stokkermans, Karel (9 January 2008). "European Competitions 1980–81". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 22 June 2011. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  2. ^ "The story of a legend: Sir Bobby's factfile". ESPN. 31 July 2009. Retrieved 16 June 2011. 
  3. ^ Jackson, Stuart. "Season 1979–80". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Archived from the original on 4 June 2011. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  4. ^ Schoenmakers, Jan (20 February 2005). "Netherlands 1979/80". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  5. ^ Paul, Ian (6 March 1981). "Bingham hands Scots a World Cup compliment". The Herald. Glasgow. p. 34. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  6. ^ "1980/81: Ipswich thankful for Thijssen". Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  7. ^ "Altafini reflects on Milan marvel". Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 18 September 2007. Archived from the original on 27 February 2008. Retrieved 30 January 2008. 
  8. ^ "Love conquers all in UEFA Cup goal race". Union of European Football Associations (UEFA). 20 May 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  9. ^ "Sir Bobby Robson: fact file". The Daily Telegraph. UK. 31 July 2009. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  10. ^ Glanville, Brian (2 August 2009). "Sir Bobby Robson 1933–2009: the bravest knight". The Times. UK. Retrieved 14 June 2011. 
  11. ^ "Garcia goal breaks Alkmaar hearts". CNN. 5 May 2005. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
  12. ^ "Vieri stuns Ipswich". BBC Sport. 6 December 2001. Retrieved 15 June 2011. 
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