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Anderson Mesa Station

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Anderson Mesa Station

Lowell Observatory, Anderson Mesa Station
Organization Lowell Observatory, United States Naval Observatory
Code 688  
Location Coconino County, near Flagstaff, Arizona
Coordinates
Altitude 2,163 meters (7,096 ft)
Established 1959 (1959)
Website Lowell Observatory
Telescopes
Perkins Telescope 1.8 m Cassegrain telescope
John S. Hall Telescope 1.1 m Ritchey-Chretien telescope
NURO Telescope 0.8 m reflecting telescope
Navy Precision Optical Interferometer Optical Interferometer

Anderson Mesa Station is an astronomical observatory established in 1959 as a dark-sky observing site for Lowell Observatory. It is located at Anderson Mesa in Coconino County, Arizona (USA), about 12 miles southeast of Lowell's main campus on Mars Hill in Flagstaff, Arizona.

Contents

  • Telescopes 1
    • Current telescopes 1.1
    • Former telescopes 1.2
  • See also 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Telescopes

Current telescopes

  • The 1.83 m (72 in) Perkins Telescope is shared with [6][5] glass.low-expansion It was replaced in 1965 with the current mirror made of Duran-50 [2], was the largest single piece of glass ever cast in America when it was poured.J. W. Fecker, Inc. by figured The original 69-inch mirror, which was [4] It was moved to Anderson Mesa in 1961, and was purchased by Lowell in 1998. Lowell and BU formed a partnership to operate the telescope that year, and GSU joined later.[3][2].Delaware, Ohio (OWU) in Ohio Wesleyan University of Perkins Observatory, it was originally located at the Warner & Swasey Company Built in 1931 by [1]
  • The 1.07 m (42 in) John Hall Telescope was built by AstroMechanics and installed at Anderson Mesa in 1970.[7] It was named after former Lowell Observatory director John S. Hall in 1990.[8] In 2004, the Ritchey-Chrétien telescope was upgraded with a new mirror from Hextek, and with other parts.[9]
  • The 0.79 m (31 in) National Undergraduate Research Observatory (NURO) Telescope was built by AstroMechanics and installed in 1964 at Anderson Mesa by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for Project Apollo.[10] It was purchased by Lowell in 1972, and refurbished in 1990.[8][11] It is used by the NURO consortium for up to 60% of the time, and by Lowell scientists.
  • The Navy Precision Optical Interferometer (NPOI) is collaboration of Lowell Observatory, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Flagstaff Station (NOFS), and the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL).[12] Construction on the facility began in 1992, and engineering tests began in 1994. The first images were acquired in 1996.[13]

Former telescopes

  • The 0.6 m (24 in) Lowell Observatory Near-Earth-Object Search (LONEOS) Schmidt camera was used to search for asteroids and other near-earth objects. It was built by J. W. Fecker, Inc. in 1939, given to Perkins Observatory in the 1950s, and purchased by Lowell in 1990.[8] Starting in 1992 it was refurbished, and saw first light in the dome that previously held the Lowell Astrograph in 1997.[14] Use of the telescope ended along with the LONEOS project in 2008.
  • The 0.33 m (13 in) Abbot L. Lowell Astrograph, also known as the Pluto Discovery Telescope and informally as the Pluto Camera, is an astrograph built by Alvan Clark & Sons in 1929. In 1930 it was used by Clyde Tombaugh to discover Pluto.[15] In 1971, it was moved a new building at Anderson Mesa, and returned to Mars Hill in 1992.[16][17]

See also

References

  1. ^ "72-inch Perkins | Telescopes | Research | Lowell Observatory". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  2. ^ a b "History of Perkins Observatory". Perkins Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  3. ^ Phillips, Earl W., Jr. "A Short History of Perkins Observatory". The SETI League, Inc. Retrieved 2012-01-22. 
  4. ^ Horstman, H. S. (1999). "Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001. Report for the period 1 Jul 1997 - 30 Jun 1998". Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society 31: 179.  
  5. ^ Abrahams, Peter. "The Telescopes of Lowell Observatory". Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  6. ^ Hall, S. J. (1964). "Lowell Observatory report". Astronomical Journal 69: 684.  
  7. ^ Hall, J. S. (1971). "Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona. Report 1969-1970". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society 3: 125.  
  8. ^ a b c Horstman, H. S.; Millis, R. L. (1991). "Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001. Report for the period 1 Jul 1989 - 30 Jun 1990". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society 23: 361.  
  9. ^ "42-inch Hall Telescope | Telescopes | Research | Lowell Observatory". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  10. ^ Schaber, Gerald G. (2005). "The U.S. Geological Survey, Branch of Astrogeology—A Chronology of Activities from Conception through the End of Project Apollo (1960- 1973)" (PDF). United States Geological Survey. Retrieved 2012-01-22. 
  11. ^ "31-inch NURO Telescope | Telescopes | Research | Lowell Observatory". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  12. ^ "NOI Telescope | Telescopes | Research | Lowell Observatory". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  13. ^ Armstrong, J. T.; Mozurkewich, D.; Rickard, L. J; Hutter, D. J.; Benson, J. A.; Bowers, P. F.; Elias Ii, N. M.; Hummel, C. A.; et al. (1998). "The Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer". The Astrophysical Journal 496: 550.  
  14. ^ "Observing Site". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  15. ^ "Our History: Discovering Pluto | About Us | Lowell Observatory". Lowell Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-11. 
  16. ^ Hall, J. S. (1972). "Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona. Observatory report". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society 4: 105.  
  17. ^ Horstman, H. S. (1995). "Lowell Observatory, Flagstaff, Arizona 86001. Report for the period 1 Jul 1993 - 30 Jun 1994". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society 27: 267.  

External links

  • Lowell Observatory website
  • Anderson Mesa Station Clear sky clock Weather forecasts for observing conditions.
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