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Auntie's Bloomers

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Auntie's Bloomers

Auntie's Bloomers
Format Blooper / Comedy
Starring Terry Wogan
Country of origin United Kingdom
No. of episodes 31 (Original series)
Production
Location(s) BBC Television Centre
Running time 10–60 minutes
Production companies Celador (1991-1992)
Broadcast
Original channel BBC1
Picture format 4:3 (1991–2000)
16:9 (2001)
Original run 29 December 1991 (1991-12-29) – 29 December 2001 (2001-12-29)
Chronology
Followed by Outtake TV

Auntie's Bloomers was a blooper show hosted by Terry Wogan[1] that ran from 29 December 1991 to 29 December 2001 and aired on BBC1. Most bloopers consisted of homegrown BBC programmes including soaps, sitcoms, dramas and news. The first two episodes of the show were made by independent production company Celador. Their contract to produce the show expired after the broadcast of the second episode on 27 December 1992 and was not renewed, leaving the BBC to produce the show themselves from 1994 to 2001.

The show's carried a strong BBC theme, most notably throughout the mid-90s where the set was supposedly the BBC archive, and the opening titles consisted of a mysterious figure entering the BBC Television Centre and retrieving archive footage from a safe. The programme's title comes from the affectionate nickname "Auntie Beeb" by which the BBC is often referred. The show was replaced by Outtake TV in 2002,[2] a show similar in concept but with slightly less emphasis on BBC-only material.

Transmissions

Original series

Show Name Original airdate Ratings (Episode Viewing figures from BARB).[3]
Auntie's Bloomers 29 December 1991  ??
More Auntie's Bloomers 27 December 1992 18,450,000[4]
Auntie's New Bloomers 1 26 December 1994  ??
Auntie's New Bloomers 2 1 January 1995 17,900,000[5]
Auntie's Brand New Bloomers 25 December 1995 9,300,000[6]
Auntie's All New Christmas Bloomers 25 December 1996  ??
Auntie's All New Bloomers 31 March 1997  ??
Auntie's Natural Bloomers 14 July 1997  ??
Auntie's Big Bloomers (aka Auntie's Big Bloomers - when repeated in 1998) 25 December 1997 9,200,000
Auntie's New Winter Bloomers 29 December 1997  ??
Auntie's World Cup Bloomers 11 July 1998 5,370,000
Auntie's Bloomers Hall of Blame 31 August 1998 5,610,000
Auntie's Spanking New Christmas Bloomers 25 December 1998 9,080,000
Auntie's Unbelievable New Year Bloomers 2 January 1999 8,030,000
Auntie's Cracking New Bloomers 25 December 1999[7] 8,850,000
Auntie's Smashing New Bloomers 1 January 2000  ??
Auntie's Bloomers Best Bits 5 February 2000  ??
Auntie's EastEnders Birthday Bloomers 12 February 2000 7,200,000
Auntie's Foreign Antics 5 March 2000  ??
Auntie's Bloomers Hall of Blame 29 April 2000  ??
Auntie's Golden Bloomers 6 May 2000  ??
Auntie's Soccer Showdown Bloomers 10 June 2000  ??
Auntie's Shocking Soccer Bloomers 18 June 2000  ??
Auntie's Sizzling New Summer Bloomers 20 August 2000  ??
Auntie's Olympic Bloomers (Part 1) 16 September 2000 7,990,000
Auntie's Olympic Bloomers (Part 2) 30 September 2000 6,360,000
Auntie's Sparkling Bloomers 24 December 2000[8] 7,360,000
Auntie's Thermal Bloomers 26 December 2000 7,630,000
Auntie's Hall of Blame 7 April 2001 5,860,000
Auntie's Bloomers Hall of Blame 2 May 2001 6,740,000
Auntie's Bursting Bloomers 18 August 2001 7,980,000
Auntie's Christmas Bloomers 25 December 2001 2,016,000
Auntie's Glittering Bloomers 29 December 2001 6,450,000

Sporting Bloomers series

Series Start date End date Episodes
1 11 July 1995 15 August 1995 ?
2 20 June 1996 22 August 1996 ?
3 6 June 1997 11 July 1997 ?
4 10 June 1999 22 July 1999 ?

References

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