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Benjamin Ruggles

Benjamin Ruggles (February 21, 1783 – September 2, 1857) was a National Republican and Whig politician from Ohio. He served in the U.S. Senate.

Contents

  • Biography 1
  • Career 2
  • Family life 3
  • Death 4
  • Notes 5
  • References 6
  • External links 7

Biography

Born in Abington, Windham County, Connecticut, Ruggles studied law and was admitted to the bar. Ruggles moved to Marietta, Ohio to practice law in 1807, then moved to St. Clairsville, Ohio in 1810.

Career

After serving as a judge in the Ohio state courts from 1810 to 1815, Ruggles was elected to the Senate, serving three terms from 1815-1833. He did not run for re-election in 1832. Ohio Presidential elector in 1836 for Whig William Henry Harrison.[1]

Family life

Ruggles married in Connecticut in 1812. His first wife died in St. Clairsville in 1817, and he remarried in 1825.[2]

Death

Ruggles died on September 2, 1852 and was buried in Saint Clairsville Union Cemetery, Saint Clairsville, Belmont County, Ohio USA.[3]

Notes

  1. ^ Taylor 1899 : 193
  2. ^
  3. ^

References

External links


 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

United States Senate
Preceded by
Joseph Kerr
U.S. Senator (Class 1) from Ohio
1815–1833
Served alongside: Jeremiah Morrow, William A. Trimble, Ethan A. Brown, William H. Harrison, Jacob Burnet, Thomas Ewing
Succeeded by
Thomas Morris
Legal offices
Preceded by
Calvin Pease
President Judge of the Ohio Court of Common Pleas
3rd Judicial Circuit

1810–1815
Succeeded by
George Tod

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