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California Proposition 92 (2008)

 

California Proposition 92 (2008)

California Proposition 92 was Californian ballot proposition that voters rejected on February 5, 2008. It was a state initiative that would have amended Proposition 98, which set a mandate for the minimum level of funding each year for elementary and secondary schools and for the California Community Colleges.

Contents

  • Proposal 1
  • Results 2
  • References 3
  • External links 4

Proposal

Proposition 92 would have established a system of independent public community college districts and Board of Governors within the framework of the California Constitution. A minimum level of state funding for school districts and community college districts would have been calculated separately from the current K-14 education budget. Additionally, 10.46 percent of current Proposition 98 school funding maintenance would have been allocated to community colleges. Furthermore, community college fees would have froze at $15/unit per semester and limit future increase based upon a devised formula. Other associated budgetary allocations earmarked for the current K-14 system would also been divied accordingly.

Proposition was projected to amount to an increase in state spending on K–14 education from 2007–08 through 2009–10—averaging about $300 million per year, with unknown impacts annually thereafter. The loss of student fee revenues would have been potentially about $70 million annually. Currently, student fees of $20/unit, go to the general fund, not to the community college where the student is enrolled.

Results

Proposition 92[1]
Choice Votes %
Referendum failed No 4,831,445 57.21
Yes 3,613,332 42.79
Valid votes 8,444,777 93.12
Invalid or blank votes 623,638 6.88
Total votes 9,068,415 100.00

References

  1. ^

External links

  • Yes on 92
  • No on 92
  • California Voter Information Guide of Proposition 92
  • ABC7.com: Prop 92 defeated
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