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Candelabrum

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Candelabrum

This article is about candelabra. For the hydroid genus Candelabrum, see Candelabridae.

A candelabrum (plural candelabrums, candelabra, candelabras),[1] sometimes called a candle tree, is a candlestick holder with multiple arms. The word comes from Latin.[2][3]

In modern usage the plural form "candelabra" is frequently used in the singular sense, with the true singular form "candelabrum" becoming rare. Likewise, "candelabra" and "candelabras" are preferred over "candelabrums" as the plural form.[1]

Although the electrification of indoor lighting has relegated candleholders to the status of backup light sources in most homes and other buildings, interior designers continue to model light fixtures and lighting accessories after candelabra and candlesticks. Accordingly, the term "candelabra" has entered common use as a collective term for small-based incandescent light bulbs used in chandeliers and other lighting fixtures made for decoration as well as lighting.

A special kind of candelabra is the Jewish menorah.

Candelabra antennas

In the United States and Canada, the plural term candelabra is a nickname for radio masts and towers with multiple transmission antennas. Baltimore's TV stations, WMAR-TV, WBAL-TV, and WJZ-TV in 1959 built the world’s first three-antenna candelabra tower, 730 feet tall. Other examples include the Mont Royal Candelabra in Montréal, Québec, the KXTV/KOVR/KCRA Tower, KSMO Candelabra Tower, KMBC/KCWE Candelabra Tower, and Sutro Tower in San Francisco.

See also

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