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Charles Giordano

Charles Giordano
Born October 13, 1954
Brooklyn, New York, USA
Genres Rock
Blues
Folk
Occupations Musician
Instruments Organ
Piano
Accordion
Years active 1983–present
Associated acts Bruce Springsteen
The E Street Band
The Sessions Band
Pat Benatar
Notable instruments
Hammond B3
Nord Electro3
Yamaha Motif xf7

Charles Giordano (born October 13, 1954 in Brooklyn, New York[1]) is an American keyboardist and accordionist.[1] Giordano is known primarily as the newest adjunct member of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, playing keyboards and organ following the serious illness and subsequent death of longtime E Street organist Danny Federici in 2008. He is also known for playing keyboards with Pat Benatar in the 1980s,[1] for playing keyboards and accordion with Springsteen's Sessions Band on the 2006 album We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions and subsequent Sessions Band Tour,.[1][2]

With Benatar he was usually billed as Charlie Giordano and played for five albums, beginning in 1983;[3] his role in the band was praised by Billboard magazine.[3] With Benatar he was identifiable by his glasses and distinctive array of berets, blazers and 1980s-style ties. Giordano also was a member of The David Johansen Group and went on to perform with Buster Poindexter and The Banshees of Blue.

As a session musician Giordano's playing has included Madeleine Peyroux's 1996 album Dreamland and Bucky Pizzarelli's 2000 album Italian Intermezzo; the latter's mix of opera, Italian folk, and swing presaged his appearance in the similarly genre-mashing Sessions Band Tour with Springsteen. Giordano also participated in a 2002 revival of garage rock band ? and the Mysterians. In 2008, he accompanied British singer Barb Jungr for a short stand in a New York City cabaret.

References

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