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Convair YB-60

YB-60
YB-60 prototype, Convair B-36F in the background
Role Strategic bomber
Manufacturer Convair
First flight 18 April 1952
Status Canceled 14 August 1952
Number built 1
Program cost US$14.3 million for program[1]
Developed from Convair B-36

The Convair YB-60 is an American experimental bomber prototype for the United States Air Force canceled on 14 August 1952.

Contents

  • Design and development 1
  • Specifications (YB-60) 2
  • See also 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Design and development

On 25 August 1950, Convair issued a formal proposal for a swept-winged version of the B-36 with all-jet propulsion. The United States Air Force was sufficiently interested that on 15 March 1951, the USAF authorized Convair to convert two B-36Fs (49-2676 and 49-2684) as B-36Gs. Since the aircraft was so radically different from the existing B-36, the designation was soon changed to YB-60.

The YB-60 had 72% parts commonality with its piston-engined predecessor. The fuselages of the two aircraft were largely identical, although the YB-60 had a longer, pointed nose with a needle-like instrument probe instead of the B-36's rounded nose; its tail surfaces were swept to match the wings and a wedge-shaped insert added at the wing root. The swept wings also used many B-36 parts.

The YB-60's unofficial competitor for an Air Force contract was Boeing's B-52 Stratofortress. Convair's proposal was substantially cheaper than Boeing's since it involved modifying an existing design rather than starting from scratch. Like the B-52, it was powered by eight Pratt & Whitney J57-P-3 turbojets mounted in pairs in four pods suspended below the wing.

Instead of the B-36's crew of 15, the YB-60's crew numbered 10. Production B-60s were to have defensive armament similar to those of the B-36.

Convair YB-60 serial number 49-2676 made its maiden flight on 18 April 1952, piloted by Beryl Erickson. The Boeing YB-52 beat the Convair aircraft into the air by three days. The YB-60 was approximately 100 mph (160 km/h) slower than the YB-52 and also had severe handling problems. It carried a heavier bomb load—72,000 lb (33,000 kg) against 43,000 lb (20,000 kg) for the YB-52—but the Air Force did not see the need for the extra capacity given the YB-60's other drawbacks. Later "big belly" modifications increased the B-52's bomb load to 60,000 pounds (27,000 kg).

The flight test programs were canceled on 20 January 1953 with 66 flying hours accumulated, and a second prototype was never completed. The airframe was built, but it was not fitted with engines or much equipment. Since Convair completed their prototype contract satisfactorily, both YB-60s were formally accepted by the Air Force in 1954. The operational aircraft never flew again, and both airframes were scrapped by July.

Specifications (YB-60)

A YB-60 in flight.

General characteristics

  • Crew: five (two pilots, navigator ,bombardier /radio operator ,radio operator/tail gunner )
  • Length: 171 ft (52.1 m)
  • Wingspan: 206 ft (62.8 m)
  • Height: 60 ft 6 in (18.4 m)
  • Wing area: 5,239 ft2 (486.7 m2)
  • Empty weight: 153,016 lb (69,407 kg)
  • Loaded weight: 160,000 lb (73,000 kg)
  • Max. takeoff weight: 300,000 lb (140,000 kg)
  • Powerplant: 8 × Pratt & Whitney J57-P-3 turbojets, 8,700 lbf (38 kN) each

Performance

Armament
  • Guns:20 mm (0.787 in) cannon in tail
  • Bombs: 72,000 lb (33,000 kg)

See also

Related development
Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era
Related lists

References

  1. ^ Knaack, Marcelle Size (1988). Post-World War II bombers, 1945-1973. Office of Air Force History.  
  • Jacobsen, Meyers K. and Wagner, Ray. B-36 in Action (Aircraft in Action No.42). Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal Publications, Inc., 1980. ISBN 0-89747-101-6.
  • Jones, L.S. U.S. Bombers, B-1 1928 to B-1 1980s. Fallbrook, CA: Aero Publishers, Inc., 1962 (second edition 1974). ISBN 0-8168-9126-5.

External links

  • Convair YB-60
  • "Heavies of the U.S. and Russian air forces", Popular Mechanics, June 1952, p. 93.
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