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Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham

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Title: Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham  
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Subject: John Sankey, 1st Viscount Sankey, Quintin Hogg, Baron Hailsham of St Marylebone, Claud Schuster, 1st Baron Schuster, Edward Frederick Lindley Wood, 1st Earl of Halifax, Fourth National ministry
Collection: 1872 Births, 1950 Deaths, Attorneys General for England and Wales, Attorneys-General of the Duchy of Cornwall, British Secretaries of State, Conservative Party (Uk) Mps, Leaders of the House of Lords, Lord Chancellors of Great Britain, Lord Presidents of the Council, Members of Lincoln's Inn, Members of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for English Constituencies, Members of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, People Educated at Eton College, Presidents of the Marylebone Cricket Club, Uk Mps 1922–23, Uk Mps 1923–24, Uk Mps 1924–29, Viscounts in the Peerage of the United Kingdom
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Douglas Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham

The Right Honourable
The Viscount Hailsham
PC
Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain
In office
28 March 1928 – 4 June 1929
Monarch George V
Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin
Preceded by The Viscount Cave
Succeeded by The Viscount Sankey
In office
7 June 1935 – 9 March 1938
Monarch George V
Edward VIII
George VI
Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin
Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by The Viscount Sankey
Succeeded by The Lord Maugham
Leader of the House of Lords
In office
5 November 1931 – 7 June 1935
Prime Minister Ramsay MacDonald
Preceded by The Marquess of Reading
Succeeded by The Marquess of Londonderry
Secretary of State for War
In office
5 November 1931 – 7 June 1935
Preceded by The Marquess of Crewe
Succeeded by The Viscount Halifax
Lord President of the Council
In office
9 March 1938 – 31 October 1938
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by The Viscount Halifax
Succeeded by The Viscount Runciman of Doxford
Personal details
Born 28 February 1872 (1872-02-28)
Died Did not recognize date. Try slightly modifying the date in the first parameter. (Age 78)
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s) Elizabeth Marjoribanks

Douglas McGarel Hogg, 1st Viscount Hailsham PC (28 February 1872–16 August 1950) was a British lawyer and Conservative politician.

Contents

  • Background 1
  • Political career 2
  • Marriage & children 3
  • References 4
  • External links 5

Background

Hogg was the son of the merchant and philanthropist Quintin Hogg, seventh son of Sir James Hogg, 1st Baronet (see Hogg Baronets). He was educated at Eton College and then studied sugar growing in the West Indies. After serving in the Boer War he was called to the Bar in 1902.

Political career

He was one of the foremost advocates of his age and as Attorney-General guided the Trade Disputes Act of 1927 through the House of Commons after the general strike of 1926 which had ended with large-scale unemployment while those still employed were forced to accept longer hours, lower wages, and district wage agreements. The Trade Disputes and Trade Union Act made mass picketing and all sympathetic strikes illegal and directed that union members had to contract into any political levy. It also forbade civil service unions from affiliating with the Trades Union Congress.

Hogg was a bencher (barrister) who participated in the running of one of the four Inns of Court, Lincoln's Inn. He presided as Lord Chancellor (equivalent to head of the Supreme Court with governmental roles also) during the Conservative governments of 1928–29 and 1935–1938. Accordingly and in view of his handling as to legislation shaping major issues facing the economy in the 1920s, in line with the government's agenda, the government nominated his creation into the most common form of peerage, Baron, in 1928, and in one of the last such creations of senior titles outside of the Royal Family, Viscount Hailsham, of the town of the same name in Sussex, the following year.[1] During his second term he was the last Lord High Steward to preside over the trial of a peer (Lord de Clifford) in the House of Lords.

Marriage & children

Lord Hailsham married Elizabeth Marjoribanks (nee Brown), widow of Hon Archibald Marjoribanks, and daughter of James Trimble Brown of Tennessee, in 1905. They had two sons:[2]

References

  1. ^  
  2. ^ The Peerage, entry for 1st Viscount Hailsham

External links

  • Hansard 1803–2005: contributions in Parliament by the Viscount Hailsham
Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Sir Samuel Edward Scott
Member of Parliament for St Marylebone
19221928
Succeeded by
Sir James Rennell Rodd
Legal offices
Preceded by
Ernest Pollock
Attorney General
1922–1924
Succeeded by
Patrick Hastings
Preceded by
Patrick Hastings
Attorney General
1924–1928
Succeeded by
Thomas Inskip
Political offices
Preceded by
The Viscount Cave
Lord Chancellor
1928–1929
Succeeded by
The Viscount Sankey
Preceded by
The Marquess of Crewe
Secretary of State for War
1931–1935
Succeeded by
The Viscount Halifax
Preceded by
The Marquess of Reading
Leader of the House of Lords
1931–1935
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Londonderry
Preceded by
The Viscount Sankey
Lord Chancellor
1935–1938
Succeeded by
The Lord Maugham
Preceded by
The Viscount Halifax
Lord President of the Council
1938
Succeeded by
The Viscount Runciman of Doxford
Party political offices
Preceded by
The Marquess of Salisbury
Leader of the Conservative Party in the House of Lords
1931–1935
Succeeded by
The Marquess of Londonderry
Peerage of the United Kingdom
New creation Viscount Hailsham
1929–1950
Succeeded by
Quintin Hogg
Baron Hailsham
1928–1950
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