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Ellis Clarke

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Ellis Clarke

His Excellency
Sir Ellis Emmanuel Innocent Clarke
GCMG KStJ
1st President of Trinidad and Tobago
In office
1 August 1976 – 13 March 1987
Prime Minister Eric Williams
George Chambers
A.N.R. Robinson
Preceded by Elizabeth II
as Queen of Trinidad and Tobago
Succeeded by Noor Hassanali
Governor General of Trinidad and Tobago
In office
15 September 1972 – 1 August 1976
Prime Minister Eric Williams
Preceded by Solomon Hochoy
Personal details
Born (1917-12-28)28 December 1917
Belmont, Trinidad and Tobago
Died 30 December 2010(2010-12-30) (aged 93)
Maraval, Trinidad and Tobago
Nationality Trinidad and Tobago
Spouse(s) Ermyntrude Hagley
Alma mater University College LondonUniversity of London
Religion Roman Catholic

Sir Ellis Emmanuel Innocent Clarke, GCMG (28 December 1917 – 30 December 2010)[1] was the second and last Governor-General of Trinidad and Tobago and the first President of Trinidad and Tobago. He was one of the main architects of Trinidad and Tobago's 1962 Independence constitution.

Biography

Clarke attended Saint Mary's College, winning an Island Scholarship in Mathematics in 1938. Ellis Clarke attended University College London of the University of London, where he received a Bachelor of Law degree and was called to the bar at Gray's Inn. He returned to Port of Spain in 1941, taking up private practice there.

He served as Solicitor-General from 1954 to 1956, Deputy Colonial Secretary 1956–57, and Attorney General 1957–62. After Independence in 1962 he served as Ambassador to the United States, Canada and Mexico, and Permanent Representative to the United Nations.

In 1972 he succeeded Sir Solomon Hochoy as Governor General. When Trinidad and Tobago became a Republic in 1976, Clarke was unanimously elected the country's first President by the presidential electoral college, which comprised the elected members of both Houses of Parliament. He was re-elected by the PNM-controlled electoral college and completed his second term in 1987. Disagreements with the new National Alliance for Reconstruction government resulted in Clarke's decision not to seek a third term. He was succeeded by Noor Hassanali.

Ellis Clarke was invested as a Queen Elizabeth II in 1960 and was awarded a knighthood as a Knight Grand Cross of that Order in 1972. Although he ceased to use the title Sir after the country became a republic, after retirement from the presidency he re-adopted his title and was generally referred to as "Former President, Sir Ellis Clarke" or Sir Ellis.

He was married to Lady Ermyntrude Clarke (1921–2002) for almost fifty years.[2] They had three children: Peter Ellis Clarke (married to Suzanne Traboulay, a former beauty queen), Margaret-Ann (married to Gordon Fisken of Edinburgh, Scotland) and Richard (who died as a young child). Sir Ellis also has four grandsons: John, Michael, Alexander and David, and one granddaughter, Katrina. John, Michael and David all carry Ellis as their middle name(s).

Ellis Clarke was one of six experts worldwide asked to submit reports to Australia's Republic Advisory Committee in 1993 detailing his country's experience in moving from a constitutional monarchy to a republic.

On 24 November 2010, Clarke suffered a massive stroke.[3] He died on 30 December 2010, two days after his 93rd birthday.[4] Sir Ellis was laid to rest on 7 January 2011. A private funeral was held at the Church of the Assumption on Maraval Road in Port of Spain. Both his living children as well as his four grandsons gave tributes. Following the private funeral, a State Funeral was held at the National Academy for the Performing Arts Building situated at the Queens Park Savannah. It was an Inter-Religious Celebration at which the President, Prime Minister and Chief Justice paid fitting tributes. In attendance were Members of Parliament, Senators, members of the Diplomatic Corp., and Foreign Heads of State and Dignatories. A procession through Port of Spain followed the service. Sir Ellis' coffin, draped in a Trinidad and Tobago flag, was set atop a cannon and pulled by a military vehicle. The procession concluded at Laperouse Cemetery, where he was buried at the Clarke Family Plot, which was attended by all his family and friends.

Political offices
Preceded by
Sir Solomon Hochoy
Governor-General of Trinidad and Tobago
1973–1976
Succeeded by
Preceded by
President of Trinidad and Tobago
1976–1986
Succeeded by
Noor Hassanali

References

  1. ^ "T&T's first President Sir Ellis Clarke is dead". CTNT World. Retrieved 31 December 2010. 
  2. ^ Paul Donovan, "Obituary: Sir Ellis Clarke", Independent Catholic News, 1 February 2011.
  3. ^ Julian Neaves, "Sir Ellis Is Dead", Trinidad Express Newspapers, 31 December 2010.
  4. ^ Lord, Richard (31 December 2010). "Sir Ellis passes at 93". Trinidad Guardian. Retrieved 31 December 2010. 

External links

  • Biography
  • Biography of Sir Ellis Clarke", Trinidad and Tobago Newsday, 31 December 2010.
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