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Eugenia Washington

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Eugenia Washington

Eugenia Scholay Washington
Born Eugenia Scholay Washington
(1838-06-27)June 27, 1838
"Megwillie," near Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia), United States
Died November 30, 1900(1900-11-30) (aged 62)
Washington, D.C., United States
Resting place "Glencairne," Falmouth, Virginia, United States
Residence 813 13th Street, Northwest
Washington, D.C.
5706 Berwyn Road
Berwyn Heights, Maryland
Nationality American
Ethnicity European American
Citizenship United States of America
Confederate States of America
Occupation American historian and civil servant
Employer United States Post Office Department
Known for co-founding the Daughters of the American Revolution and founding the Daughters of the Founders and Patriots of America
Home town Charles Town, Virginia (now West Virginia)
Falmouth, Virginia
Religion Roman Catholicism
Parent(s) William Temple Washington (father)
Margaret Calhoun Fletcher (mother)
Relatives Samuel Washington (great-grandfather)
George Washington (great-great-uncle)
George Steptoe Washington (grandfather)
Lucy Payne Washington Todd (grandmother)
Dolley Payne Todd Madison (great-aunt)
John C. Calhoun (great-great-uncle)
Thomas Fletcher (grandfather)

Eugenia Scholay Washington (June 27, 1838 – November 30, 1900) was an American historian, civil servant, and a founder of the lineage societies, Daughters of the American Revolution and Daughters of the Founders and Patriots of America.

Washington was born in 1838 near President of the United States, and a grandniece of Dolley Payne Todd Madison. Following her family's relocation to Stafford County, she and her family witnessed the Battle of Fredericksburg first hand during the American Civil War.

Due to her family's limited financial resources after the war and her father's illness, Washington accepted a position as a American colonial era.

While visiting a relative in Louisiana around 1870, Washington attended a Roman Catholic mission. She later converted to Roman Catholicism from her Episcopal faith, after which she became a prominent lecturer of the Catholic faith. Washington never married, and she died in 1900. Washington was interred beside her mother at the Moncure family burial ground of her sister's estate, "Glencairne," in Falmouth, Virginia.

Contents

  • Early life, family, and ancestry 1
  • American Civil War 2
  • United States Post Office Department 3
  • Daughters of the American Revolution 4
  • Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America 5
  • Catholic faith 6
  • Later life and death 7
  • Legacy 8
  • References 9
  • Bibliography 10
  • External links 11

Early life, family, and ancestry

Eugenia Scholay Washington was born on June 27, 1838, at "Megwillie" plantation near Charles Town in Jefferson County, Virginia (now West Virginia), to William Temple Washington (1800–1877) and his wife, Margaret Calhoun Fletcher (1805–1865).[1][2][3] The name of the plantation on which she was born, "Megwillie," was a portmanteau of both her mother and father's nicknames.[4]

Through her father, Washington was the granddaughter of

  • Media related to Eugenia Washington at Wikimedia Commons

External links

Bibliography

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1901, p. 3.
  2. ^ a b Brogan & Mosley 1993, p. 74.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k
  4. ^ Wallace & Reed 2006, p. 9.
  5. ^ a b c d e f du Bellet, Jaquelin & Jaquelin 1907, p. 55.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Davidson 2008, p. 19.
  7. ^ a b c National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1908, p. 598.
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h
  9. ^ National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1901, p. 2.
  10. ^ a b Marling 1988, p. 94.
  11. ^ a b c d e f
  12. ^ a b c d e Morgan 2005, p. 44.
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l
  14. ^ a b c King 2008, p. 3.
  15. ^ a b c Somerville 1985, p. 9.
  16. ^ a b c d
  17. ^ a b c James 1971, p. 432.
  18. ^ a b
  19. ^ a b National Society of the Sons of the American Revolution 1991, p. 22.
  20. ^ James 1971, p. 433.
  21. ^ a b c d e National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1901, p. 4.
  22. ^
  23. ^ O'Neill 1916, p. 66.
  24. ^ a b
  25. ^ a b
  26. ^ a b c
  27. ^ a b Norbertine Fathers & Archconfraternity of St. Joseph 1922, p. 490.
  28. ^ a b Hetzel 1903, p. 220.
  29. ^ National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1925, p. 198.
  30. ^ a b
  31. ^ National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1901, p. 220.
  32. ^ National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1901, p. 224.
  33. ^ National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution 1901, pp. 328–329.
  34. ^ King 2008, p. 115.
  35. ^ King 2008, p. 116.
  36. ^
  37. ^

References

[13] On October 13, 1999, a year after their own centennial, 21 members of the Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America met at the gravesite to unveil a larger memorial plaque honoring her.[37] On April 17, 1929, under the leadership of President General Grace L. H. Brosseau, the Daughters of the American Revolution dedicated a memorial to its four founders, including Washington; it was sculpted by

[7] She was also mentioned at the [21] Many chapters of the society expressed their appreciation and respect.[21] By Washington's death in 1900, membership in the National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution numbered around 35,000.

The Founders of the Daughters of the American Revolution, a 1929 marble sculpture by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney honoring the society's four co-founders, including Washington. It is located alongside DAR Constitution Hall in Washington, D.C.

Legacy

[27] Following Washington's death, her sister Jean was the last surviving patrilineal descendant of William Temple Washington.[33][32][31][24] in Washington, D.C., on December 31, 1900.St. Patrick's Catholic Church for Washington were held at requiem mass and memorial service A [30] Washington's sister, Jean Washington Moncure, also a resident of Washington and married to Thomas Gascoigne Moncure, arranged for Washington's funeral at her own house and

Washington never married.[6][13][14] In 1892, Washington purchased a second residence at 5706 Berwyn Road in Berwyn Heights, Maryland, from James E. Waugh; she owned it until her death.[6] While in Washington, D.C., she resided with her cousin Fanny Washington Finch at 813 13th Street, Northwest.[28] Washington died at the age of 62 on Thanksgiving Day, November 30, 1900, at her home on 13th Street.[8][11][21] Washington's housemate and cousin Fanny Washington Finch predeceased her in March of that year.[28] Only "a few acquaintances" among Washington's colleagues and employees in her Post Office bureau knew she was ill, and she worked until a week before her death.[8][11]

Later life and death

While visiting a family member in Paulists at a neighboring parish.[23][24][25] After "careful study", Washington was received into the Roman Catholic Church.[25][26][27] Prior to her conversion, Washington consulted with a clergyman at her Episcopal church, and in response to his concern, she replied: "Oh no, I must act up to my convictions and I shall pray hard that you may be given the same grace."[26] Washington became a prominent lecturer of the Catholic faith and attended the Cathedral of St. Matthew the Apostle in Washington, D.C.[8][26]

Catholic faith

[13] Washington founded another lineage society, the

Daughters of Founders and Patriots of America

Washington was the DAR's first Registrar General, and her name appears as member "number one" on the "grand roll" of membership.[2][16][21] Washington also served as secretary general, vice president general, and in 1895 she became honorary vice president general, an office which she held until her death.[5][21] Under Washington's leadership, the society raised funds for a national monument to [15]

Washington and Desha consulted regularly with Sons of the American Revolution members for advice, particularly Registrar General Dr. [12][18][20]

Washington was one of the four co-founders of the Sons of the American Revolution, founded in New York City on April 30, 1889, which excluded women.[3][17] According to society tradition, Washington's experiences during the American Civil War "inspired in her a will to assist women from both the North and the South in the worthy cause of preserving their shared heritage".[3]

Jeweled badge awarded to Washington by the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution

Daughters of the American Revolution

After her mother's death, Washington accepted a position as a [13] Washington and her father relocated from Falmouth to Washington in 1867, and she lived there until her death in 1900.[1][5][11] During her tenure with the Post Office, Washington was known as "Miss Eugie" and "considered quite attractive and always received a great deal of attention wherever she went".[3][15] During her last decade, Washington served as a clerk in the Dead Letter Office.[10]

United States Post Office Department

By the end of the American Civil War, Washington and her family were "deprived of all worldly goods".[1] Washington's mother, Margaret, died shortly after the war's conclusion in 1865, and her father, William Temple, died twelve years later in 1877.[1][13]

Following her family's relocation to Falmouth, Washington continued to live a "tranquil life" caring for her father until the [12]

American Civil War

Washington's father, William Temple Washington, was educated at the [12][13][14]

Through her mother, Washington was great-grandniece of John C. Calhoun (1782–1850).[1][3] Also through her mother, Washington was descended from Charles Francois Joseph, Count de Flechir (born in France in 1755), who served in the American Revolutionary War and was "a friend and kinsman" of Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette.[1][5][11] Flechir's grandson and Washington's grandfather, Thomas Fletcher, served on the staff of General William Henry Harrison in the War of 1812.[1][5][8]

[6].Harewood at Washington's grandparents' residence, James Madison The widowed Dolley Payne Todd married [7][6] (1768–1849).Dolley Payne Todd Madison First Lady of the United States Washington's grandmother, Lucy Payne Washington Todd, was a sister of [6]

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