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FIFA U-17 World Cup

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Title: FIFA U-17 World Cup  
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FIFA U-17 World Cup

FIFA U-17 World Cup
Founded 1985
Region International (FIFA)
Number of teams 24
Current champions  Nigeria (4th title)
Most successful team(s)  Nigeria (4 titles)
Website U-17 World Cup
2015 FIFA U-17 World Cup

The FIFA U-17 World Cup, founded as the FIFA U-16 World Championship, later changed to the FIFA U-17 World Championship and known by its current name since 2007, is the world championship of FIFA).

The first edition was staged in 1985 in China, and tournaments have been played every two years since then. It began as a competition for players under the age of 16 with the age limit raised to 17 from the 1991 edition onwards. The most recent tournament was hosted by the UAE and won by Nigeria, with the next edition being hosted by Chile in 2015, followed by India who will host the tournament in 2017

Nigeria is the most successful nation in the tournament's history, with four titles and three runners up. Brazil is the second most successful with three titles and two runners up. Ghana and Mexico have won the tournament twice.

A corresponding tournament for female players, the FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup, began in 2008, with North Korea winning the inaugural tournament.

Contents

  • Structure 1
  • Qualification 2
  • Results 3
    • Summaries 3.1
      • FIFA U-16 World Championship 3.1.1
      • FIFA U-17 World Championship 3.1.2
      • FIFA U-17 World Cup 3.1.3
    • Performances by countries 3.2
    • Performances by continental zones 3.3
  • Awards 4
  • Records and statistics 5
  • See also 6
  • References 7
  • External links 8

Structure

Each tournament consists of a group phase, in which four teams play against one another and standings in the group table decide which teams advance, followed by a knockout phase of successive matches where the winning team advances through the competition and the losing team is eliminated. This continues until two teams remain to contest the final, which decides the tournament winner. The losing semi-finalists also contest a match to decide third place.

From 1985 to 2005 there were 16 teams in the competition, divided into four groups of four teams each in the group phase. Each team played the others in its group and the group winner and runner up qualified for the knockout phase. From 2007 the tournament was expanded to 24 teams, divided into six groups of four teams each. The top 2 places in each group plus the four best third-placed teams advanced to the knockout phase.

Competition matches are played in two 45-minute halves (i.e. 90 minutes in total). In the knockout phase, until the 2011 tournament, if tied at the end of 90 minutes an additional 30 minutes of extra time were played, followed by a penalty shoot-out if still tied. Starting with the 2011 tournament, the extra time period was eliminated to avoid player burnout, and all knockout games progress straight to penalties if tied at the end of 90 minutes.

Qualification

The host nation of each tournament qualifies automatically. The remaining teams qualify through competitions organised by the six regional confederations. For the first edition of the tournament in 1985, all of the teams from Europe plus Bolivia appeared by invitation of FIFA.

Confederation Championship
AFC (Asia) AFC U-16 Championship
CAF (Africa) African Under-17 Championship
CONCACAF (North, Central America and Caribbean) CONCACAF Under-17 Championship
CONMEBOL (South America) South American Under-17 Football Championship
OFC (Oceania) OFC U-17 Championship
UEFA (Europe) UEFA European Under-17 Football Championship

Results

Summaries

FIFA U-16 World Championship

Year Host Final Third Place Match Number of teams
Champion Score Second Place Third Place Score Fourth Place
1985
Details
 China
Nigeria
2–0
West Germany

Brazil
4–1
Guinea
16
1987
Details
 Canada
Soviet Union
1–1 a.e.t.
(4–2 PSO)

Nigeria

Ivory Coast
2–1 a.e.t.
Italy
16
1989
Details
 Scotland
Saudi Arabia
2–2 a.e.t.
(5–4 PSO)

Scotland

Portugal
3–0
Bahrain
16

FIFA U-17 World Championship

Year Host Final Third Place Match Number of teams
Champion Score Second Place Third Place Score Fourth Place
1991
Details
 Italy
Ghana
1–0
Spain

Argentina
1–1 a.e.t.
(4–1 PSO)

Qatar
16
1993
Details
 Japan
Nigeria
2–1
Ghana

Chile
1–1 a.e.t.
(4–2 PSO)

Poland
16
1995
Details
 Ecuador
Ghana
3–2
Brazil

Argentina
2–0
Oman
16
1997
Details
 Egypt
Brazil
2–1
Ghana

Spain
2–1
Germany
16
1999
Details
 New Zealand
Brazil
0–0 a.e.t.
(8–7 PSO)

Australia

Ghana
2–0
United States
16
2001
Details
 Trinidad and Tobago
France
3–0
Nigeria

Burkina Faso
2–0
Argentina
16
2003
Details
 Finland
Brazil
1–0
Spain

Argentina
1–1 a.e.t.
(5–4 PSO)

Colombia
16
2005
Details
 Peru
Mexico
3–0
Brazil

Netherlands
2–1
Turkey
16

FIFA U-17 World Cup

Year Host Final Third Place Match Number of teams
Champion Score Second Place Third Place Score Fourth Place
2007
Details
Korea Republic
Nigeria
0–0 a.e.t.
(3–0 PSO)

Spain

Germany
2–1
Ghana
24
2009
Details
 Nigeria
Switzerland
1–0
Nigeria

Spain
1–0
Colombia
24
2011
Details
 Mexico
Mexico
2–0
Uruguay

Germany
4–3
Brazil
24
2013
Details
 UAE
Nigeria
3–0
Mexico

Sweden
4–1
Argentina
24
2015
Details
 Chile 24
2017
Details
 India 24
  • Key:
    • aet - after extra time
    • PSO- match won on penalty shootout

Performances by countries

Team Titles Runners-up Third-place Fourth-place Medals
 Nigeria 4 (1985, 1993, 2007, 2013) 3 (1987, 2001, 2009) 7
 Brazil 3 (1997, 1999, 2003) 2 (1995, 2005) 1 (1985) 1 (2011) 6
 Ghana 2 (1991, 1995) 2 (1993, 1997) 1 (1999) 1 (2007) 5
 Mexico 2 (2005, 2011) 1 (2013) 3
 Soviet Union 1 (1987) 1
 Saudi Arabia 1 (1989) 1
 France 1 (2001) 1
  Switzerland 1 (2009) 1
 Spain 3 (1991, 2003, 2007) 2 (1997, 2009) 5
 Germany 1 (19851) 2 (2007, 2011) 1 (1997) 3
 Scotland 1 (1989) 1
 Australia 1 (1999) 1
 Uruguay 1 (2011) 1
 Argentina 3 (1991, 1995, 2003) 2 (2001, 2013) 3
 Ivory Coast 1 (1987) 1
 Portugal 1 (1989) 1
 Chile 1 (1993) 1
 Burkina Faso 1 (2001) 1
 Netherlands 1 (2005) 1
 Sweden 1 (2013) 1
 Colombia 2 (2003, 2009) 0
 Guinea 1 (1985) 0
 Italy 1 (1987) 0
 Bahrain 1 (1989) 0
 Qatar 1 (1991) 0
 Poland 1 (1993) 0
 Oman 1 (1995) 0
 United States 1 (1999) 0
 Turkey 1 (2005) 0
1 as West Germany

Performances by continental zones

Africa is the most successful continental zone with 6 tournament wins (4 for Nigeria, 2 for Ghana) and 5 times as runner up. Notably the 1993 final was contested by two African teams, the only occasion when the final has been contested by two teams from the same confederation.

South America has 3 tournament wins and has been runner up three times. Additionally Argentina has finished in third place on 3 occasions, Chile has done so on one occasion and Colombia has finished in fourth place twice, but neither of the latter two have ever appeared in the final.

Europe has 3 tournaments wins (1 each for France, USSR and Switzerland) and has been runner up 5 times. Spain has been runner up on 3 occasions. Additionally Portugal and Netherlands have won third-place medals in 1989 and 2005 respectively.

The CONCACAF zone has 2 tournament wins (for Mexico in 2005 and 2011), this confederation has reached the final three times(with Mexico).

Asia has 1 tournament win (for Saudi Arabia in 1989), the only time that a team from this confederation has reached the final and the only time an Asian team won a FIFA tournament in male category. (Australia was runner up in 1999 but at that time was in the Oceania Football Confederation).

Oceania has no tournament wins and 1 occasion as runner up (for Australia in 1999). Australia has since moved to the Asian confederation.

This tournament is peculiar in that the majority of titles have gone to teams from outside the strongest regional confederations (CONMEBOL and UEFA). Of the fifteen editions held so far, nine (60 percent of the total) have been won by teams from North and Central America, Africa and Asia.

Confederation (continent) Performances
Winners Runners-up Third
CAF (Africa) 6 times: Nigeria (4), Ghana (2) 5 times: Nigeria (3), Ghana (2) 3 times: Ghana (1), Côte d'Ivoire (1), Burkina Faso (1)
UEFA (Europe) 3 times: France (1), Soviet Union (1), Switzerland (1) 5 times: Spain (3), Germany (1), Scotland (1) 7 times: Germany (2), Spain (2), Netherlands (1), Portugal (1), Sweden (1)
CONMEBOL (South America) 3 times: Brazil (3) 3 times: Brazil (2), Uruguay (1) 5 times: Argentina (3), Brazil (1), Chile (1)
CONCACAF (North, Central America and Caribbean) 2 times: Mexico (2) 1 time: Mexico (1) 0 time:
AFC (Asia) 1 time: Saudi Arabia (1) 0 time: 0 time:
OFC (Oceania) 0 time: 1 time: Australia (1) 0 time:

Awards

At every tournament three awards are presented:

  • The Golden Shoe is awarded to the top goalscorer of tournament.
  • The Golden Ball is awarded to the most valuable player of the tournament.
  • The Fair Play Award is presented to the team with the best disciplinary record in the tournament.
Tournament Golden Ball Golden Shoe Award Goals Golden Glove Fair Play Award
1985 China William Marcel Witeczek 8 Not Award  West Germany
1987 Canada Philip Osundu Moussa Traoré 5  Soviet Union
1989 Scotland James Will Fode Camara 3  Bahrain
1991 Italy Nii Lamptey Adriano 4  Argentina
1993 Japan Daniel Addo Wilson Oruma 6  Nigeria
1995 Ecuador Mohamed Kathiri Daniel Allsopp 5  Brazil
1997 Egypt Sergio Santamaría David 7  Argentina
1999 New Zealand Landon Donovan Ishmael Addo 7  Mexico
2001 Trinidad and Tobago Florent Sinama Pongolle Florent Sinama Pongolle 9  Nigeria
2003 Finland Cesc Fàbregas Cesc Fàbregas 5  Costa Rica
2005 Peru Anderson Carlos Vela 5  North Korea
2007 South Korea Toni Kroos Macauley Chrisantus 7  Costa Rica
2009 Nigeria Sani Emmanuel Borja González 5 Benjamin Siegrist  Nigeria
2011 Mexico Julio Gómez Souleymane Coulibaly 9 Jonathan Cubero  Japan
2013 United Arab Emirates Kelechi Iheanacho Valmir Berisha 7 Dele Alampasu  Nigeria
2015 Chile
2017 India

Records and statistics

The United States appeared in all first 14 editions of the competition (1985–2011) until missing out in 2013, Brazil has appeared 14 times too while Argentina and Australia 11 times.

Nigeria have won the tournament 4 times followed by Brazil with 3 tournament wins. Nigeria have appeared in the final on 7 occasions while Brazil have made 5 final appearances.

Mexico is the first and only host team that won on home soil (2011).

France's Florent Sinama Pongolle in the 2001 edition and Souleymane Coulibaly from Côte d'Ivoire in the 2011 edition hold the record for the most goals scored by a player in a single tournament, scoring 9 goals.

Nigeria holds the record for most goals scored by a team in a single tournament with 26 goals in the 2013 tournament hosted by United Arab Emirates. They are closely followed by Germany with a total of 24 goals in the 2011 tournament hosted by Mexico.

Canada's Quillan Roberts holds the record as the only goalkeeper to score a goal at the tournament, and in any FIFA 11-a-side tournament, scoring the equalizer in the 87th minute against England on June 22, 2011.[1]

See also

References

  1. ^

External links

  • FIFA.com
  • RSSSF archive
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