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Fichu

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Fichu

Elizabeth Sewall Salisbury wears an embroidered fichu pinned at the neck, 1789.

A fichu is a large, square kerchief worn by women to fill in the low neckline of a bodice. It originated in the United Kingdom in the 18th century and remained popular there and in France through the 19th with many variations,[1] as well as in the United States.[2] The fichu was generally of linen fabric and was folded diagonally into a triangle and tied, pinned, or tucked into the bodice in front.

Contents

  • See also 1
  • References 2
  • Sources 3
  • External links 4

See also

References

  1. ^ Elizabeth J. Lewandowski, The Complete Costume Dictionary (Scarecrow Press, 2011), 107, available online, accessed January 3, 2014
  2. ^ Dorothy Denneen Volo and James M. Volo, Daily Life in Civil War America, 2nd edition (Greenwood, 2009), 298, available online, accessed January 3, 2014

Sources

  • Baumgarten, Linda: What Clothes Reveal: The Language of Clothing in Colonial and Federal America, Yale University Press, 2002. ISBN 0-300-09580-5
  • Cunnington, C.Willett and Phillis Emily Cunnington: Handbook of English Costume in the Eighteenth Century. London: Faber, 1972.
  • Payne, Blanche: History of Costume from the Ancient Egyptians to the Twentieth Century, Harper & Row, 1965. No ISBN for this edition; ASIN B0006BMNFS
  • Ribeiro, Aileen: Dress in Eighteenth Century Europe 1715-1789, Yale University Prison, 2002, ISBN 0-300-09151-6

External links

  • Victorian Fashions and Costumes from Harper's Bazar, 1867-1898
  • 18th century women's kerchiefs and fichus
  • Description from Diderot's Encyclopedie
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