World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Freddie Fitzsimmons

Article Id: WHEBN0001857834
Reproduction Date:

Title: Freddie Fitzsimmons  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: List of World Series starting pitchers, Ben Chapman (baseball), List of Philadelphia Phillies managers, Larry Jansen, Sal Maglie
Collection: 1901 Births, 1979 Deaths, American People of Irish Descent, Baseball Players from Indiana, Boston Braves Coaches, Brooklyn Dodgers Coaches, Brooklyn Dodgers Players, Chicago Cubs Coaches, Deaths from Myocardial Infarction, Indianapolis Indians Players, Kansas City Athletics Coaches, Major League Baseball Pitchers, Major League Baseball Pitching Coaches, Minneapolis Millers (Baseball) Managers, Minor League Baseball Managers, Muskegon Muskies Players, New York Giants (Nl) Coaches, New York Giants (Nl) Players, People from Mishawaka, Indiana, Philadelphia Phillies Managers
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Freddie Fitzsimmons

Freddie Fitzsimmons
Pitcher
Born: (1901-07-28)July 28, 1901
Mishawaka, Indiana
Died: November 18, 1979(1979-11-18) (aged 78)
Yucca Valley, California
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 12, 1925, for the New York Giants
Last MLB appearance
July 16, 1943, for the Brooklyn Dodgers
MLB statistics
Record 217-146
Earned run average 3.51
Strikeouts 870
Teams

as Player

as Manager

Career highlights and awards

Frederick Landis Fitzsimmons (July 28, 1901 – November 18, 1979), nicknamed "Fat Freddie," was an American right-handed pitcher, manager and coach in Major League Baseball who played from 1925 to 1943 with the New York Giants and Brooklyn Dodgers. Known for his mastery of the knuckle curve, his 217 wins were the third most by a National League right-hander in the period from 1920 to 1955, trailing only Burleigh Grimes and Paul Derringer. In 1940 he set an NL record, which stood until 1959, with a single-season winning percentage of .889 (16–2). He was an agile fielder in spite of his heavy build, holding the major league record for career double plays (79) from 1938 to 1964, and tying another record by leading the league in putouts four times; he ranked eighth in NL history in putouts (237) and ninth in fielding percentage (.977) when his career ended.

Born in Mishawaka, Indiana, Fitzsimmons broke in with the Giants in August 1925, posting a 6–3 record over the rest of the year. After seasons of 14 and 17 wins, he earned a career-high 20 victories in 1928, a year which saw the arrival of teammate Carl Hubbell; until Fitzsimmons' departure in 1937, the two would form a formidable left-right combination at the heart of the Giants' staff. In 1930 he led the NL in winning percentage for the first time with a 19–7 record (.731), and an 18–11 season followed in 1931. In 1933, the first full season after Bill Terry took over from John McGraw as manager, he won 16 games with a 2.90 earned run average as the Giants won the NL pennant; in the 1933 World Series against the Washington Senators, he suffered a 4–0 defeat in Game 3, though it was New York's only loss as they captured their first title since 1922.

He had another 18-win season in 1934, and led the NL in putouts for the fourth time, tying Grover Cleveland Alexander's major league mark. However, his career then began to struggle. He had years of 4–8 and 10–7 in 1935 and 1936, with the Giants winning the NL pennant again the latter year; he led the NL in shutouts in 1935, blanking opponents in all 4 of his victories. His troubles returned in the 1936 World Series against the New York Yankees; he lost Game 3 by a 2–1 score, and was bombarded in the final Game 6 loss, leaving in the fourth inning while trailing 5–2. After a 6–10 start in 1937, he was traded to the Dodgers in June for reliever Tom Baker, who made only 15 appearances for the Giants. Brooklyn shortstop Leo Durocher praised his new teammate's competitiveness, saying, "I wish we had nine guys like Fitz. We'd never lose." Though his record in 1938-39 totaled only 18–17, in 1938 he tied Grimes' mark of 74 career double plays, passing him the following year; Warren Spahn broke his record in 1964. He came back in 1940 with a 16–2 campaign, finishing fifth in the MVP voting. His .889 winning percentage broke the NL record of .842 (16–3) shared by Tom L. Hughes (1916 Boston Braves) and Emil Yde (1924 Pittsburgh Pirates), and stood until Roy Face posted an 18–1 mark (.947) with the 1959 Pirates.

Fitzsimmons made only 12 starts in 1941, going 6–1 as the Dodgers won their first pennant since 1920. He almost earned his long-elusive World Series victory against the Yankees, holding them to four hits through seven innings in Game 3. But he was forced to leave with a 0–0 score after being struck in the kneecap by a line drive hit by Marius Russo, though he was alert enough to throw a runner out at second to end the inning. His replacement surrendered two runs in the eighth, and New York triumphed 2–1.

Following his knee injury, he made only one start in 1942, and the Dodgers traded him to the tailending Philadelphia Phillies in the middle of the 1943 season; he was immediately tabbed as the Phils' manager, ending his playing career. He compiled a 217–146 (.598) record with an ERA of 3.51 and 870 strikeouts in 513 games and 3223-2/3 innings pitched. He ran the Phillies through the middle of the 1945 season, compiling only 105 wins against 181 losses (.367). In 1943 and 1944 he also served as general manager of the Brooklyn Dodgers in the All-America Football Conference. Fitzsimmons then became a coach with the Boston Braves (1948), Giants (1949–55), Chicago Cubs (1957–59; 1966) and Kansas City Athletics (1960). On the Giants staff of Durocher, his teammate and manager in Brooklyn, he finally earned a championship as the pitching coach for the 1954 World Series team.

Bob Lemon broke the major league mark shared by Fitzsimmons by leading the American League in putouts five times between 1948 and 1954; Greg Maddux eventually broke the NL record.

Fitzsimmons died of a heart attack at age 78 in Yucca Valley, California.[1] He was buried at Montecito Memorial Park, in Colton, California.[2]

See also

References

  1. ^ Fitzsimmons dies of heart attack
  2. ^ Frederick Landis "Freddie" Fitzsimmons at Find a Grave

External links

  • Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Baseball-Reference (Minors)
  • BaseballLibrary - career highlights
  • The Baseball Page - biography
  • The Deadball Era - New York Times obituary
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.