World Library  
Flag as Inappropriate
Email this Article

Geneva International Jewish Film Festival

Article Id: WHEBN0043711873
Reproduction Date:

Title: Geneva International Jewish Film Festival  
Author: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Language: English
Subject: Zagreb Jewish Film Festival, List of film festivals in Europe
Collection: Annual Events in Switzerland, International Film Festivals, Jewish Film Festivals, Recurring Events Established in 2011
Publisher: World Heritage Encyclopedia
Publication
Date:
 

Geneva International Jewish Film Festival

The Geneva International Jewish Film Festival (GIJFF) is an annual film festival dedicated to world cinema that focuses on Jewish life, history and culture worldwide. It was founded in 2011 and takes place in Switzerland.[1]

The festival is organised by UK Jewish Film.

Contents

  • History 1
    • 2011 1.1
    • 2012 1.2
    • 2013 1.3
    • 2014 1.4
  • References 2
  • External links 3

History

2011

The first Festival took place from 23 to 27 March 2011, opening with the Swiss premiere of Barney’s Version.[1]

2012

The second Festival took place from 21 to 25 March 2012.[2] It opened with the Swiss premiere of Gei Oni, which was attended by the film's director, Dan Wolman, and its lead actor Zion Ashkenazi, who took part in a question and answer session after the screening.[3]

Other films shown included: the Oscar-nominated Footnote; Mahler on the Couch, revealing the extraordinary encounter between Gustav Mahler and Sigmund Freud; Remembrance; Five Brothers, a crime thriller from director Alexandre Arcady; and My Best Enemy, based in wartime Vienna.[3]

2013

The third Festival took place from 12 to 14 April 2013. It opened with The Zigzag Kid. Other films included A Bottle in the Gaza Sea, The Flat and Being Jewish in France.[4]

2014

The fourth Festival took place from 26 to 30 March 2014 in Geneva and Lausanne.[5]

References

  1. ^ a b "1st Geneva International Jewish Film Festival 23–27 March 2011". Film festivals. UK Jewish Film. 2011. Retrieved 31 August 2014. 
  2. ^ "The 2nd Geneva International Jewish Film Festival".  
  3. ^ a b "2nd Geneva International Jewish Film Festival 21–25 March 2012". Film festivals. UK Jewish Film. 2012. Retrieved 1 September 2014. 
  4. ^ "3rd Geneva International Jewish Film Festival 12–14 April 2013". Film festivals. UK Jewish Film. 2013. Retrieved 1 September 2014. 
  5. ^ "4th Geneva International Jewish Film Festival 26–30 March 2014". Film festivals. UK Jewish Film. 2014. Retrieved 1 September 2014. 

External links

  • Official website
This article was sourced from Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. World Heritage Encyclopedia content is assembled from numerous content providers, Open Access Publishing, and in compliance with The Fair Access to Science and Technology Research Act (FASTR), Wikimedia Foundation, Inc., Public Library of Science, The Encyclopedia of Life, Open Book Publishers (OBP), PubMed, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, U.S. National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health (NIH), U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, and USA.gov, which sources content from all federal, state, local, tribal, and territorial government publication portals (.gov, .mil, .edu). Funding for USA.gov and content contributors is made possible from the U.S. Congress, E-Government Act of 2002.
 
Crowd sourced content that is contributed to World Heritage Encyclopedia is peer reviewed and edited by our editorial staff to ensure quality scholarly research articles.
 
By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. World Heritage Encyclopedia™ is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.
 


Copyright © World Library Foundation. All rights reserved. eBooks from Project Gutenberg are sponsored by the World Library Foundation,
a 501c(4) Member's Support Non-Profit Organization, and is NOT affiliated with any governmental agency or department.