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George Mathews (actor)

George Mathews
Born (1911-10-10)October 10, 1911
New York City
Died November 8, 1984(1984-11-08) (aged 73)
Caesars Head, South Carolina
Cause of death Heart Disease
Occupation Actor
Years active 1933-1972
Spouse(s) Mary Hayneworth

George Mathews (10 October 1911 – 7 November 1984) was an American actor whose career stretched from an uncredited appearance in Stage Door Canteen in 1943 to Going Home in 1971.[1] Burly, heavy-featured, and tall (6' 5") he had an extensive career on stage which began in the early 1930s, when he failed to get a job with the U.S. Mail. He joined the W.P.A. Theatre, and landed a key role in the play Processional (1937) as Dynamite Jim.

With his broad face, strong eyebrows, pug nose, and jutting lower lip, Mathews was often cast as heavies or hardened military types. He appeared in both the stage (1942–43) and film version (1944) of The Eve of St. Mark, as Sergeant Ruby. He also succeeded in effectively portraying comic thugs, which he did in Pat and Mike (1952), starring Katharine Hepburn, and in the Garson Kanin-directed musical comedy Do Re Mi (1960–62), as Fatso O'Rear, starring Phil Silvers. He also demonstrated his comedic talent in the short-lived television comedy series Glynis (1963), playing ex-cop Chick Rogers, who assists a mystery writer and amateur sleuth, played by Glynis Johns, in solving "whodunnits", He was also in the Broadway play Catch Me If You Can in 1965. Perhaps his most memorable role was as Harvey in The Bensonhurst Bomber episode of The Honeymooners.

Mathews retired from the screen in 1972 and died from heart disease in Caesars Head, South Carolina in November 1984. He was married to Mary (Hayneworth) Mathews (? - 1984) until his death.

References

External links

  • Internet Movie Database


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