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George Neville, 5th Baron Bergavenny

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Title: George Neville, 5th Baron Bergavenny  
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Subject: Thomas Digges, William Brooke, 10th Baron Cobham, Henry Neville (died 1593), Thomas FitzAlan, 17th Earl of Arundel, Thomas Scott (died 1594), Thomas Nevill, John St. Leger
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George Neville, 5th Baron Bergavenny

Template:Infobox nobility


George Neville or Nevill, 5th and de jure 3rd Baron Bergavenny KG, PC (c.1469 – 1535/6) was an English courtier. He held the office of Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports.

Family

George Neville was born in Abergavenny, Monmouthshire, the son of George Neville, 4th Baron Bergavenny, by his first wife, Margaret Fenne (d. 28 September 1485), daughter of Hugh Fenne, sub-treasurer of England.[2] Margaret was born about 1444 at Scoulton Burdeleys in Norfolk.

He was an elder brother of Sir Thomas Neville, a trusted councillor of King Henry VIII and Speaker of the House of Commons, and the courtier Sir Edward Neville who was executed in 1540 on order of King Henry VIII, charged with devising to maintain, promote, and advance King Henry's cousin, Cardinal Reginald Pole, late Dean of Exeter, enemy of the King, beyond the sea, and to deprive the King.

Career

Neville fought against the Cornish rebels on 17 June 1497 at the Battle of Blackheath.[3] At the coronation of King Henry VIII in 1509, he held the office of Chief Larderer.[4] On 18 December 1512, King Henry VIII granted him the castle and lands of Abergavenny.[5] From 1521 to 1522 he was imprisoned on suspicion of conspiring with his father-in-law, the Duke of Buckingham. At the coronation of Anne Boleyn in 1533, Nevill once again held the honour of Chief Larderer and was allowed to officiate.[3]

Neville was buried before 24 January 1536 at Birling, Kent.[6] His heart was buried at Mereworth.[6]

Marriages and issue

Neville married firstly Joan FitzAlan (d. 14 November 1508), the daughter of Thomas FitzAlan, 17th Earl of Arundel, and Margaret Woodville (d. before 4 August 1492), second daughter of Richard Woodville, 1st Earl Rivers. She was a younger sister of Elizabeth Woodville, wife of Edward IV. According to Hawkyard, the marriage was childless; however according to Cokayne and Richardson, there were two daughters of the marriage:[7][6][8][9]

He married secondly, before 5 September 1513, Margaret Brent, the daughter of John Brent of Charing, Kent,[11] and Anne Rosmoderes, by whom he had no issue.[12]

He married thirdly, about June 1519, Lady Mary Stafford, youngest daughter of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham, by Lady Eleanor Percy, by whom he had three sons and five daughters:[13]

He married fourthly his former servant, Mary Brooke alias Cobham, by whom he had a daughter whose name is unknown.[11]

Footnotes

References

External links

  • thepeerage.com page (name and number details are different)

Ancestry

Honorary titles
Preceded by
Sir Edward Poyning
Lord Warden of the Cinque Ports
1534
Succeeded by
Sir Edward Guilford
Peerage of England
Preceded by
George Nevill
Baron Bergavenny
1492–1535
Succeeded by
Henry Nevill

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