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Guildhall School of Music

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Guildhall School of Music

Guildhall School of Music and Drama
120px
Established 1880
Type Public
Students 800+[1]
Location City of London, England, United Kingdom
Campus Urban
Affiliations City University, London[2]
Website

Guildhall School of Music and Drama is an independent music and dramatic arts school which was founded in 1880 in London, England. Students can pursue courses in Music, Opera, Drama and Technical Theatre Arts.

History

The first Guildhall School was housed in an old warehouse in Aldermanbury, but these premises soon proved too small. A new purpose-built building in John Carpenter Street was designed by City Architect Sir Horace Jones and opened in December 1886. It is owned by the City of London Corporation and takes its name from the Corporation's historic headquarters at the Guildhall, though it was never based there. Before 1935 it was known as the Guildhall School of Music. Since 1977 it has been situated next to the Barbican Arts Centre in the Barbican Complex.

In 2004, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama's external examinations department merged with the performing arts examinations division of Trinity College London to form Trinity Guildhall Examinations. Today, the merged examinations board offers qualifications in performing and teaching in areas such as music, speech and drama, and dance to external students. However the name Trinity Guildhall was dropped in 2012 and the board's examinations are now offered under the Trinity College London brand.

Present day

The school offers both undergraduate and graduate degree programs[3] as well as the Junior Guildhall, a Saturday school serving students from 4 to 18 years of age.[4] The school's outreach activities won the Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2005. The school was awarded a further Queen's Anniversary Prize in 2007 in recognition of the outstanding achievements and work of the Opera Programme.[5]

The school's performance facilities include a 308-seat drama and opera theatre, concert hall, lecture/recital hall and a small studio theatre. In addition, students of the school regularly perform in other London venues, including the Barbican Centre, the Bridewell Theatre (off Fleet Street), the Soho Theatre, the Swan (Stratford) and the Royal Court.

Future

In 2008 work began to redevelop the Milton Court complex, which is near to the School's main building and part of which has been used by the School for several years. The new 36-floor building, funded by the City of London and developed by Heron International, houses a 625-seat concert hall, a 225-seat theatre and a 90-seat studio theatre, as well as studios for television, radio, teaching, rehearsal, office and support services. The extension to the School is estimated to cost around £89million; the acoustic design, which received good reviews for the opening concert in September 2013, was by Arup.

Notable alumni

For a list of alumni see Category:Alumni of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama
See also the list of winners of the Gold Medal of the Guildhall School of Music and Drama

Notable staff

See also

References

External links

  • Guildhall School of Music and Drama website
  • City selects preferred Milton Court developer (June 2006)
  • Guildhall School seeks new extension (February 2006)
  • Trinity Guildhall at the Trinity College, London

Template:Performing Arts Schools in the United Kingdom Coordinates: 51°31′10″N 0°05′32″W / 51.5194°N 0.0923°W / 51.5194; -0.0923

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