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Irish diaspora

 

Irish diaspora

  • ^ Bunbury, Turtie. "Now African Americans are trying to trace THEIR Irish roots after being inspired by Barack Obama". Retrieved 20 June 2014. 
  • ^ Wiethoff, William E. (2006). Crafting the Overseer's Image. University of South Carolina press. p. 71.  
  • ^ Encyclopedia of New Zealand: “Gold and Gold mining” (updated July 13, 2012) pp 3,9
  • ^ Fraser, Lyndon. “Structure and agency: Comparative perspectives on Catholic Irish experiences in New Zealand and the U.S” (December 1995) Vol 14 No 2. pp 93. Kenny, Kevin. “A global Irish Case Study” (June 2003) vol.90 No 1.pp. 153.
  • ^ Carthy, Angela. “Personal letters and the Organization of Irish Migrants to and from New Zealand 1848-1925”(May 2003) Vol. 33 no .131 pp. 303
  • ^ Nolan, Melanie “Kith, Kirk and the Working class of Ulster Scots: A transfer of Ulster Scots culture to New Zealand” vol 209 (2004) pp 21.
  • ^ "United States - Selected Social Characteristics in the United States: 2008". 
  • ^ James Webb, Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America (New York: Broadway Books, 2004), front flap: 'More than 27 million Americans today can trace their lineage to the Scots, whose bloodline was stained by centuries of continuous warfare along the border between England and Scotland, and later in the bitter settlements of England's Ulster Plantation in Northern Ireland.' ISBN 0-7679-1688-3
  • ^ James Webb, Secret GOP Weapon: The Scots Irish Vote, Wall Street Journal (23 October 2004). Accessed 7 September 2008.
  • ^ "U.S. Census Bureau, 2008". Factfinder.census.gov. Retrieved 2012-08-25. 
  • ^ "National Household Survey (NHS) Profile, Canada, 2011". www12.statcan.gc.ca. National Household Survey. April 2, 2014. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved April 2, 2014. 
  • ^ http://www.securitycornermexico.com/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=578
  • ^ Marshall, Tom (2010-06-17). "World Cup 2010: France are the common enemy for Mexico and Ireland". The Guardian (London). 
  • ^ Coogan page 609
  • ^ Rhodes, Stephen A. (1 May 1998). Where the nations meet: the church in a multicultural world. InterVarsity Press. p. 201.  
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  • ^ http://www.irishabroad.com/news/irishpost/featurearticles/anirisheasterrising.asp
  • ^ Census home: Office for National Statistics
  • ^ "Statistical Classification and Delineation of Settlements". Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. February 2005. 
  • ^ Scotland's Census Results Online – Ethnicity and Religion tables
  • ^ dfa.ie
  • ^ Record number of Irish immigrants to celebrate St. Patrick's Day in Australia
  • ^ Ireland country profile
  • ^ "Mexico". The World Factbook. CIA. 
  • ^ "CSO 2011 Census – Volume 5 – Ethnic or Cultural Background (including the Irish Traveller Community)" (PDF). 2011. Retrieved 9 July 2009. 
  • ^ Colin Barr, "'Imperium in Imperio': Irish Episcopal Imperialism in the Nineteenth Century", English Historical Review 2008 123(502): 611–650
  • ^ Laurence Cox, "The politics of Buddhist revival: U Dhammaloka as social movement organiser". Contemporary Buddhism 11/2: 173–227
  • ^ Catherine Maignant, "Irish base, global religion: the Fellowship of Isis". 262–280 in Olivia Cosgrove et al. (eds), Ireland's new religious movements. Cambridge Scholars 2011, ISBN 978-1-4438-2588-7.
  • ^ Carole Cusack, "'Celticity' in Australian alternative spiritualities". 281–299 in Olivia Cosgrove et al. (eds), Ireland's new religious movements. Cambridge Scholars 2011, ISBN 978-1-4438-2588-7
  • ^ Hume, John et al (2008). Britain & Ireland: Lives Entwined III. British Council. p. 127.  
  • ^ Glazier, Michael (ed.) (1999) The Encyclopedia of the Irish in America. Notre Dame IN: University of Notre Dame Press ISBN 0-268-02755-2
  • ^ a b The Encyclopedia of the Irish in America (1999) ISBN 0-268-02755-2
  • ^ The Encyclopedia of the Irish in America (1999)
  • ^ "http://www.thehindu.com/news/international/article13786.ece"
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