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J (psychedelic)

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J (psychedelic)

1,3-Benzodioxolylbutanamine, 3,4-Methylenedioxybutanphenamine, MDB, (BDB; J; 3,4-methylenedioxy-α-ethylphenethylamine) is an entactogenic drug of the phenethylamine chemical class.[1][2] It is the α-ethyl analogue of methylenedioxyphenethylamine (MDPEA) and MDA.

BDB was first synthesized by Alexander Shulgin. In his book PiHKAL (Phenethylamines i Have Known And Loved), the dosage range is listed as 150–230 mg, and the duration is listed as 4–8 hours. BDB produces entactogenic, MDMA-like effects. While pleasant and euphoric, BDB is also fairly sedating and some users feel that the lack of stimulant effect makes it less enjoyable than other similar drugs. Additional side effects associated with BDB include nystagmus and dizziness. Very little data exists about the pharmacological properties, metabolism, and toxicity of BDB.

Animal studies and anecdotal reports show that BDB is a slightly more potent serotonin releasing agent than its methylated sister compound methylbenzodioxylbutanamine (MBDB; "Eden", "Methyl-J").[3] However, it is more commonly known as a metabolite of the N-alkylated analogues MBDB and ethylbenzodioxylbutanamine (EBDB; "Ethyl-J") which have appeared in so-called methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; "Ecstasy", "Adam", "Empathy", "Molly", "E", "X", "XTC") tablets.[4][5] While BDB itself has not been reported as being sold as "Ecstasy", urine analysis of "Ecstasy" users suggest that this drug may have appeared as a street drug, although it is unclear whether the positive urine test for BDB resulted from consumption of BDB itself or merely as a metabolite of MBDB.[6]

See also

References

External links

  • J entry in PiHKAL • info


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