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Laddu

Laddu
Coconut and Jaggery Balls
Place of origin South Asia
Main ingredients Flour, milk, sugar
Variations Gram flour, rava
Other information Served on festive or religious occasions
Cookbook: Laddu 
Laddus packed for a wedding
Laddus

Laddu or laddoo are ball-shaped sweets popular in the Indian Subcontinent. Laddus are made of flour, minced dough and sugar with other ingredients that vary by recipe. They are often served at festive or religious occasions.[1][2]Laddoo is an omnipresent sweet, It is referred back in olden days as the Narayl Nakru in South it dates back to the time of the Chola Empire when it was a sweet that was packed for travelers and warriors as a symbol of good luck for their expeditions. [3]

Contents

  • Composition 1
    • Boondi laddu 1.1
    • Besan laddu 1.2
  • Use 2
  • Cultural references 3
  • See also 4
  • References 5
  • External links 6

Composition

Common flours used for laddu include besan (chickpea flour), rava (wheat semolina) and ground coconut. These are combined with sugar and other flavorings, cooked in ghee and molded into a ball shape. Some laddu recipes are prepared using Ayurvedic medicinal ingredients, including methi laddu, multigrain and resin laddu.

Boondi laddu

Boondi laddu is made from boondi. It is often served in occasions like marriages, or festivals such as Raksha bandhan and Diwali. Motichoor laddu is made from fine boondi where the balls are tiny and is cooked with ghee or oil. Originally this laddu was a Tamil sweet, but it is now popular throughout India.

Besan laddu

Besan laddu (Hindi: बेसन के लड्डू) is a popular Indian sweet dish made of Besan (chickpea flour or gram flour), sugar and ghee.

Besan Laddu decorated with silver foil and almond chips.

Besan is roasted in ghee till golden brown appearance with nutty fragrance. Then sugar is added to it. Pistachio pieces are also mixed in this mixture optionally. Sweet balls are then made from this mixture. It has a long shelf life.

It is often served at festivals, family events and religious occasions in India.

Use

Laddu is often prepared for festivals or family events such as weddings and births, or given as a prasad at Hindu temples, especially at Venkateswara Temple, Tirumala, Andhra Pradesh, it is famous with the name Tirupati Laddu. Laddu is considered a traditional Eid dessert in some Muslim communities.

In Maharashtrian cuisine, there are traditional recipes for laddu intended as travel provisions.

Cultural references

In the Sesame Street episode "Rakhi Road", laddus are featured prominently as a favoured Indian dessert. Elmo is shown making laddus and enjoying eating them as part of the celebrations around the Indian festival of Rakhi.[4]

A laddu weighing 6,300 kg was made for a Ganesh festival in Andhra Pradesh, India in September 2012. This was claimed to be the largest known laddu.[5]

In the movie English Vinglish, the protagonist Shashi Godbole (Sridevi) is a housewife who makes and sells laddoos as a home-run business.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Sweet shops make hay in Diwali shine". The New Indian Express. 
  2. ^ Sangeetha Devi Dundoo. "As good as home". The Hindu. 
  3. ^ "Food Story: The journey of ladoo from a medicine to the much-loved Indian sweet". The New Indian Express. 
  4. ^ "Show Guide Landing". Sesame Street. Retrieved 2011-10-13. 
  5. ^ "6,300 kg Tapeswaram laddu creates record". The New Indian Expres. Express Network Private Limited. Retrieved 27 September 2012. 

External links

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