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Lovech Province

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Lovech Province

Lovech Province
Oбласт Ловеч
Province
Location of Lovech Province in Bulgaria
Location of Lovech Province in Bulgaria
Country Bulgaria
Capital Lovech
Municipalities 8
Government
 • Governor Vanya Sabcheva
Area
 • Total 4,128 km2 (1,594 sq mi)
Population (February 2011)
 • Total 141,422
 • Density 34/km2 (89/sq mi)
Time zone EET (UTC+2)
 • Summer (DST) EEST (UTC+3)
License plate OB
Website oblastlovech.org
Municipalities within Lovech Province with their main towns

Lovech Province (Bulgarian: Област Ловеч, transliterated Oblast Lovech, former name Lovech okrug) is one of the 28 provinces of Bulgaria, lying at the northern centre of the country. It is named after its main city - Lovech. As of December 2009, the population of the area is 151,153.[1][2][3]

Contents

  • Municipalities 1
  • Population 2
    • Ethnic groups 2.1
    • Language 2.2
    • Religion 2.3
  • References 3
  • See also 4

Municipalities

The Lovech province (област, oblast) contains eight municipalities (singular: oбщина, obshtina - plural: общини, obshtini). The following table shows the names of each municipality in English and Cyrillic, the main town or village (in bold), and the population as of December 2009.

Municipality Cyrillic Pop.[1][2][3] Town/Village Pop.[4][2][5]
Apriltsi Априлци 3,554 Apriltsi 3,207
Letnitsa Летница 5,101 Letnitsa 3,739
Lovech Ловеч 53,578 Lovech 38,579
Lukovit Луковит 19,469 Lukovit 9,630
Teteven Тетевен 22,016 Teteven 10,613
Troyan Троян 33,827 Troyan 21,997
Ugarchin Угърчин 7,181 Ugarchin 2,832
Yablanitsa Ябланица 6,427 Yablanitsa 2,896

Population

The Lovech province had a population of 169,951 according to a 2001 census, of which 49.1% were male and 50.9% were female.[6] As of the end of 2009, the population of the province, announced by the Bulgarian National Statistical Institute, numbered 151,153[1] of which 29.4% are inhabitants aged over 60 years.[7]

The following table represents the change of the population in the province after World War II:
Lovech Province
Year 1946 1956 1965 1975 1985 1992 2001 2005 2007 2009 2011
Population 217,203 214,213 217,342 216,844 202,968 190,262 169,951 160,202 156,437 151,153 141 422
Sources: National Statistical Institute,[1] „Census 2001“,[2] „Census 2011“,[3] „pop-stat.mashke.org“,??

Ethnic groups

Ethnic groups in Lovech Province (2011 census)
Ethnic group Percentage
Bulgarians
  
90.9%
Gypsies
  
4.4%
Turks
  
3.3%
others and indefinable
  
1.4%
Religions in Lovech Province (2001 census)
Religious group Percentage
Orthodox Christian
  
86.4%
Muslim
  
6.2%
Protestant Christian
  
0.5%
Roman Catholic Christian
  
0.2%
others and indefinable
  
6.7%
Lovech's ruined fortress.
The Glozhene Monastery near Teteven.

Total population (2011 census): 141 422
Ethnic groups (2011 census):[8] Identified themselves: 130 180 persons:

  • Bulgarians: 118 346 (90,91%)
  • Gypsies: 5 705 (4,38%)
  • Turks: 4 337 (3,33%)
  • Others and indefinable: 1 792 (1,38%)

A further 11,000 persons in the Province did not declare their ethnic group at the 2011 census

In the 2001 census, 167,877 people of the population of 169,951 of Lovech Province identified themselves as belonging to one of the following ethnic groups (with percentage of total population):[9]
Ethnic group Population Percentage
Bulgarian 152,194 89.552%
Turkish 8,476 4.987%
Roma (Gypsy) 6,316 3.716%
Russian 269 0.158%
Armenian 12 0.007%
Vlachs 458 0.269%
Macedonian 7 0.004%
Greek 21 0.012%
Ukrainian 29 0.017%
Jewish 1 0.001%
Romanian 3 0.002%
Other 91 0.054%

Language

In the 2001 census, 168,307 people of the population of 169,951 of Lovech Province identified one of the following as their mother tongue (with percentage of total population): 154,157 Bulgarian (90.7%), 6,994 Turkish (4.1%), 6,033 Roma (Gypsy) (3.5%), and 1,123 other (0.7%).[10]

Religion

Religious adherence in the province according to 2001 census:[11]
Census 2001
religious adherence population %
Orthodox Christians 146,778 86.36%
Muslims 10,501 6.18%
Protestants 879 0.52%
Roman Catholics 366 0.22%
Other 688 0.40%
Religion not mentioned 10,739 6.32%
total 169,951 100%

References

  1. ^ a b c d (English) Bulgarian National Statistical Institute - Bulgarian provinces and municipalities in 2009
  2. ^ a b c d (English) „WorldCityPopulation“
  3. ^ a b c „pop-stat.mashke.org“
  4. ^ (English) Bulgarian National Statistical Institute - Bulgarian towns in 2009
  5. ^ „pop-stat.mashke.org“
  6. ^ (Bulgarian) Population to 01.03.2001 by Area and Sex from : Census 2001National Statistical InstituteBulgarian
  7. ^ (English) Bulgarian National Statistical Institute - Population by age in 2009
  8. ^ Population by province, municipality, settlement and ethnic identification, by 01.02.2011; Bulgarian National Statistical Institute (Bulgarian)
  9. ^ (Bulgarian) Population to 01.03.2001 by District and Ethnic Group from : Census 2001National Statistical InstituteBulgarian
  10. ^ (Bulgarian) Population to 01.03.2001 by District and Mother Tongue from : Census 2001National Statistical InstituteBulgarian
  11. ^ (Bulgarian) Religious adherence in Bulgaria - census 2001

See also


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