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Media law

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Media law

Entertainment law (or media law) is legal services to the entertainment industry. Entertainment law overlaps with intellectual property law, but the practice of entertainment law often involves questions of employment law, contract law, torts, labor law, bankruptcy law, immigration, securities law, security interests, agency, intellectual property (especially trademarks, copyright, and the so-called "Right of Publicity"), right of privacy, defamation, clearance of rights, product placement, advertising, criminal law, tax law, International law (especially Private international law), and insurance law.

Much of the work of an entertainment law practice is transaction based, i.e. drafting contracts, negotiation and mediation. Some situations may lead to litigation or arbitration.[1]

Overview

Entertainment law covers an area of law which involves media of all types (TV, film, music, publishing, advertising, Internet & news media, etc.), and stretches over various legal fields, including but not limited to corporate, finance, intellectual property, publicity and privacy, and first amendment.

For film, entertainment attorneys work with the actors agent to finalize the actor's contracts for projects. After an agent lines up work for a star the entertainment attorney negotiates with the agent and buyer of the actor's talent for compensation and profit participation. Entertainment attorneys are under strict confidentiality so the specifics of their job are kept secret. But some entertainment attorney's job descriptions have become comparable to those of a star's agent, manager or publicist. They are not limited to legal paperwork, rather assisting in building a client's career. [2]

History

As the popularity of media became widespread, the field of media law became more popular, as certain corporate professionals have wanted to participate in media. As a result, many young lawyers fledged into media law which allowed them the opportunity to increase connections in media, and the opportunity to become a media presenter or an acting role if such an opportunity arose.

Categories

Entertainment law is generally sub-divided into the following areas related to the types of activities that have their own specific trade unions, production techniques, rules, customs, case law, and negotiation strategies:

Defamation (libel and slander), personality rights and privacy rights issues also arise in entertainment law.

Media law is a legal field that refers to the following:

See also

References

  1. ^ Winter, Erica. "Entertainment Law - Glamor By Association?", LawCrossing, No date. Retrieved on 29 April 2013.
  2. ^ Wasko, Janet (2008). Hollywood Film Industry. Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishing. pp. 176–178. 

External links

  • Communications and Media Association Inc
  • National Council for the Training of Journalists book on media law
  • Media Copyrights Law
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