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Minnesota Gophers

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Minnesota Gophers

Minnesota Golden Gophers
University University of Minnesota
Conference(s) Big Ten
NCAA Division I
Athletics director Norwood Teague
Location Minneapolis, MN
Varsity teams 23
Football stadium TCF Bank Stadium
Basketball arena Williams Arena
Ice hockey arena Mariucci Arena (men)
Ridder Arena (women)
Baseball stadium Siebert Field
Soccer stadium Elizabeth Lyle Robbie Stadium
Mascot Goldy Gopher
Nickname Golden Gophers
Fight song Minnesota Rouser
Colors Maroon and Gold

         

Homepage Gophersports.com

The Minnesota Golden Gophers (commonly shortened to Gophers) are the college sports team for the University of Minnesota. The university fields both men's and women's teams in basketball, cross country, golf, gymnastics, ice hockey, swimming, tennis, and track and field. Men's-specific sports include baseball, football, and wrestling. Women's-specific sports include rowing, soccer, softball, and volleyball.

In men's and women's ice hockey, the Gophers belong to the Western Collegiate Hockey Association. In all other sports, they belong to the Big Ten Conference. Most of the facilities that the teams use for training and competitive play are located on the East Bank of the Minneapolis campus. There are arenas for men and women basketball (Williams Arena) as well as hockey (Mariucci Arena and Ridder Arena). The Gopher football team began playing at TCF Bank Stadium in September 2009. The women's soccer team plays on the St. Paul campus in Elizabeth Lyle Robbie Stadium.

The Cheerleaders and the Dance Team are also part of the university's athletic department; they are present at events for basketball, hockey, football, and volleyball.

During the 2006–2007 academic year, the Golden Gophers wrestling team won the NCAA national championship and the Big Ten team title. The Golden Gophers also won conference championships in men's hockey, men's golf, women's rowing, men's swimming and diving, and women's indoor track and field.

Traditions

Maroon and Gold

In 1880, the University of Minnesota was preparing for spring graduation. For the previous 29 years, different graduation colors were used every ceremony. In spring 1880, President Folwell began a tradition of common school colors at the University. He asked an English instructor, Mrs. Augusta Smith, to select proper colors to use for graduation ribbons and other occasions. She chose maroon and gold, which made a favorable impression on the students and faculty in 1880. As the years passed and without any kind of formal action, maroon and gold became the official school colors.


The "Golden" Gophers

The Gopher mascot is a tradition as old as the state. Minnesota was tabbed the “Gopher State” in 1857 after a satirizing cartoon, depicting nine Gophers with the heads of local politicians pulling a locomotive, was published.[1] The story was over legislative action for a $5 million railroad proposal in western Minnesota. Later, the University picked up the nickname.

The “Golden” adjective has not always been a part of the Gopher nickname. During the 1930s, the Gophers wore gold jerseys and pants. Legendary KSTP radio announcer Halsey Hall coined the term “Golden Gophers” in reference to the team’s all-gold attire on the field. From 1932 through 1941, Minnesota compiled an impressive record, losing only 12 games and winning seven Big Ten titles and five national championships—a true “golden” decade of Gopher football.

School songs

School songs for the university include Minnesota Rouser, Minnesota March, Go Gopher Victory, Our Minnesota, Minnesota Fight, Hail! Minnesota, and the Battle Hymn of the Republic.

National championships

Notes: With the exception of football, national championships are awarded by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. The NCAA itself does not award a championship for Division I-A football. The NCAA began awarding national championships for men's basketball in 1939; previous championships were retroactively awarded by the Helms Athletic Foundation. The NCAA began awarding national championships for men's ice hockey in 1948; previous championships were awarded by the Amateur Athletic Union and by the National Intercollegiate Athletic Association. The NCAA began awarding national championships for women's ice hockey in 2001; previous championships were awarded by the American Women's College Hockey Alliance.

Baseball

1956, 1960, 1964
  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (30):
1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1985, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2009, 2010
  • Big Ten Regular Season Championships (22):
1933, 1935, 1956, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1973, 1974, 1977, 1982, 1985, 1988, 1992, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2010
1982, 1985, 1988, 1992, 1998, 2001, 2004, 2010

Men's basketball

  • Big Ten Regular Season Championships (8):
1906, 1907, 1911, 1917, 1919, 1937, 1972, 1982
  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (8):
1972, 1982, 1989, 1990, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013
  • Sweet 16 Appearances (3):
1982, 1989, 1990
  • Elite 8 Appearances (1):
1990
  • NIT Appearances (11):
1973, 1980, 1981, 1983, 1992, 1993, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2008, 2012
  • NIT Championships (1):
1993

Note: A 1997 Big Ten regular season championship, NCAA Tournament appearances in 1994, 1995, 1997 (Final Four), and 1999, as well as NIT appearances in 1996 and 1998 (Championship) were vacated due to NCAA sanctions.[2][3]

Women's basketball

  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (8):
1994, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009
  • Sweet 16 Appearances (3):
2003, 2004, 2005
  • Elite 8 Appearances (1):
2004
  • Final Four Appearances (1):
2004

Men's cross country

  • Big Ten Team Championships (4):
1909, 1914, 1964, 1969

Women's cross country

  • Big Ten Team Championships (2):
2007, 2008

Football

1904, 1934, 1935, 1936, 1940, 1941, 1960
1900, 1903, 1904, 1906, 1909, 1910, 1911, 1915, 1927, 1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1938, 1940, 1941, 1960, 1967
1892, 1893
  • Bowl Games (15):
Rose – 1961, 1962
Hall of Fame – 1977
Independence – 1985
Liberty – 1986
Sun – 1999, 2003
Meineke Car Care Bowl of Texas – 2012
MicronPC.com – 2000
Music City – 2002, 2004, 2005
Insight – 2006, 2008, 2009

Traveling trophies

  • The Little Brown Jug – Accidentally left in Minnesota back in 1903 by Michigan coach Fielding H. Yost, it is painted with the victories of the two teams.
  • Floyd of Rosedale – Since 1935 the Gophers and the Iowa Hawkeyes have fought to win this bronze pig. The Gophers won the 2010 and 2011 match up for the pig, upsetting the favored Hawkeyes at TCF Bank Stadium.
  • Paul Bunyan's Axe – Minnesota and the Wisconsin Badgers have passed this trophy back and forth since 1948, although it records the two teams' encounters since 1890.
  • Governor's Victory Bell – The newest of the four trophies, the bell was created to commemorate the 1993 entrance of Penn State's Nittany Lions into the Big Ten.

Golf

Gymnastics

Men's ice hockey

1929,[4] 1940,[5] 1974, 1976, 1979, 2002, 2003
1953, 1954, 1970, 1975, 1981, 1983, 1988, 1989, 1992, 1997, 2006, 2007, 2012, 2013
1961, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1980, 1981, 1993, 1994, 1996, 2003, 2004, 2007
  • NCAA Frozen Four Appearances (20):
1953, 1954, 1961, 1971, 1974, 1975, 1976, 1979, 1981, 1983, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1994, 1995, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2012

Women's ice hockey

  • National Championships (5):
2000 (AWCHA), 2004, 2005, 2012, 2013
  • WCHA Regular Season Championships (7):
2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2010, 2013
  • WCHA Tournament Championships (5):
2002, 2004, 2005, 2012, 2013
  • NCAA Frozen Four Appearances (9):
2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013

Women's rowing

  • Big Ten Championships (1):
2007

Women's soccer

  • Big Ten Championships (3):
1995, 1997, 2008

Softball

  • Big Ten Regular Season Championships (3):
1986, 1988, 1991
  • Big Ten Tournament Championships (1):
1999

Spirit Squads

Dance Team

  • National Championships (8):
2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

Swimming

Men's tennis

  • Big Ten Team Championships (14):
1910, 1911, 1912, 1918, 1932, 1933, 1981, 1984, 1986, 1989, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995

Men's track

Women's track

Volleyball

Main article: Minnesota Golden Gophers volleyball
  • Big Ten Championships (1):
2002
  • NCAA Tournament Appearances (18):
1989, 1993, 1996–97, 1999, 2000–12
  • Sweet 16 Appearances (10):
1989, 1993, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2006, 2009
  • Final Four Appearances (3):
2003, 2004, 2009

Wrestling

2001, 2002, 2007
  • Big Ten Team Championships (13):
1910, 1912, 1913, 1941, 1957, 1959, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2012

Notable non varsity sports

Rugby

Minnesota rugby plays Division 1 college rugby in the Big Ten Universities conference against traditional Big 10 rivals such as Wisconsin and Iowa.[6] Minnesota qualified for the national playoffs in 2011, and finished the 2011 season ranked 7th in the nation.[7] Some of Minnesota's games have been well attended by fans, with the team drawing as many as 6,000 fans to watch the team play at TCF Bank Stadium.[8]

Notable athletes and coaches

Baseball

Basketball

Men's

Women's

Football

Golf

Gymnastics

Hockey

Men's

Women's

Soccer

  • Mikki Denney Wright – Coach
  • Jennifer McElmury
  • Samuel Winter

Softball

  • Kim Niederluecke

Swimming

  • Justin Mortimer

Track and Field

Women's

  • Heather Dorniden
  • Alicia Rue

Men's

  • Steve Plasencia, Head Coach
  • Paul Thornton, Assistant Coach
  • Scott Bennett, Assistant Coach
  • Roy Griak, Administrative Assistant
  • Hassan Mead
NCAA Champions Indoor
NCAA Champions Outdoor
  • Jack DeField 1942 (Pole Vault, 14–1)
  • Bob Fitch 1942 (Discus, 164–8½)
  • Jack DeField 1943 (Pole Vault, 14–1)
  • Fortune Gordien 1946 (Discus, 153–10¾)
  • Fortune Gordien 1947 (Discus, 173–3)
  • Fortune Gordien 1948 (Discus, 164–0¼)
  • Lloyd LaMois 1948 (Triple Jump, 45–10)
  • Garry Bjorklund 1971 (Six Mile, 27:43.1)
  • Adam Steele 2003 (400m, 44.57)

Current Roster of the Minnesota Gophers Track & Field team 2009–2010

Wrestling

Athletic directors

Note: From 1974 to 2002, there were separate athletic departments for men and women's sports.
  • 1922–30 Fred Leuhring
  • 1930–32 Herbert O. (Fritz) Crisler
  • 1932–41 Frank G. McCormick
  • 1941–45 Lou Keller (acting)
  • 1945–50 Frank G. McCormick
  • 1950–63 Ike J. Armstrong
  • 1963–71 Marshall J. Ryman
  • 1971–88 Paul Giel (men's)
  • 1974–76 Belmar Gunderson (women's)
  • 1976–81 Vivian M. Barfield (women's)
  • 1981–82 M. Catherine Mathison (women's interim)
  • 1982–88 Merrily Dean Baker (women's)
  • 1988–89 Holger Christiansen (men's interim)
  • 1988–2002 Chris Voelz (women's)
  • 1989–91 Rick Bay (men's)
  • 1991–92 Dan Meinert (men's interim)
  • 1992–95 McKinley Boston (men's)
  • 1995–99 Mark Dienhart (men's)
  • 1999–2002 Tom Moe (men's)
  • 2002–2012 Joel Maturi
  • 2012–present Norwood Teague

Facilities

See also

References

External links

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