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Myzocytosis

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Title: Myzocytosis  
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Subject: List of feeding behaviours, Myzozoa, Alveolata, Feeding, Pfiesteria
Collection: Alveolata, Ecology, Metabolism
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Myzocytosis

Myzocytosis

(from cell pierces the cell wall and/or cell membrane of the prey cell with a feeding tube, the conoid, sucks out the cellular content and digests it.

Myzocytosis is found in Myzozoa[1] and also in some species of Ciliophora (both comprise the alveolates). A classic example of myzocytosis is the feeding method of the infamous predatory ciliate, Didinium, where it is often depicted devouring a hapless Paramecium. The suctorian ciliates were originally thought to have fed exclusively through myzocytosis, sucking out the cytoplasm of prey via superficially drinking straw-like pseudopodia. It is now understood that suctorians do not feed through myzocytosis, but actually, instead, manipulate and envenomate captured prey with their tentacle-like pseudopodia.[2]

References

  1. ^ https://www.infona.pl/resource/bwmeta1.element.elsevier-5d35e684-a832-3187-bc57-5f3d2ba06a04
  2. ^ Rudzinska, M. A. (1973). "Do Suctoria Really Feed by Suction?". BioScience 23 (2): 87–94.  
  • Eva C. M. Nowack and Michael Melkonian (2010) Endosymbiotic associations within protists Phil. Trans. R. Soc. B 12 March 2010 vol. 365 no. 1541 699-712


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